8

I don't believe there is a "traditional taekwondo black belt bo form". The Kukkiwon (at the Foreign Taekwondo Master Training Course in 2013) says there are no weapons in Taekwondo, but some schools add them to boost their curriculum. I had a quick look in General Choi's encyclopaedias (the 1965 one and the multi-volume set) and can't find any references ...


7

According to the wikipedia: Some were inlaid or banded with strips of iron or other metals for extra strength.[11] And the link they give for reference #11 is from Jo: Art of the Japanese Short Staff, Dave Lowry, Black Belt Communications, 1987 p.22. They link to an Amazon preview which says: Occasionally too, the length of the bo was inlaid or ...


4

Most certainly not. This article on Jogo do Pau specifically tells a story of how stick fighting naturally evolved in rural areas as it is both a useful thing to have in general in the wilderness as well as a weapon simple enough to be available for everyone while not being perceived as an expression of possible aggression. And this extends back into the ...


3

For most staff work, grips change constantly to change range and direction of attacks or parries. You have a tight grip when you expect impact, and naturally, you have to let go/slide/keep simple contact when you are moving your hands to change grip position. If you are working from a form or in a class, this is something that should be shown to you. ...


2

Honestly, this more or less comes down to an iron-shod staff. In most cultures with staff weapons, someone has had the bright idea to add metal to the ends to increase the inertia with which one strikes, and to reduce the damage to the wood on impact. There are a few specialized ones such as the arribo, an octagonal cane weapon made wholly out of metal, or ...


2

Century Martial Arts advertises their smallest bamboo toothpick starting at 12 oz. That would be the 50" (4' 2") variety. The lightest fiberglass I could find in a non-exhaustive search was still 1 lb. 5 oz. If that's too heavy, the student should train so it is not too heavy. Lifting weights with proper form and properly trained supervision can be a safe ...


2

I have had more experience than most with wood. I was foreman at a yacht woodworking mill, although that was not the only thing we did to be sure. Some of the previous answers take things a bit too far. 1st and foremost is the quality of the stave. This means the integrity, any cracks, large knots, rotting, insect damage, etc. Second would be the drying of ...


1

Traditional TKD had no "Bo" form. The traditional Korean systems had very few weapons in them at all. They later began to adopt the weapons systems of surrounding nations like Japan and China. They did adopt the 6' staff, but it is called a "joong bong". In fact the Japanese Kata that were adopted and transformed into "TKD" forms were generally never given ...


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