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10

Not really. Bowing is mostly a Japanese phenomenon. Even then in Shorinji Kempo (a japanese style) we don't bow but rather put our palms together in a traditional Buddhist greeting. In Chinese arts they tend to make a rough yin/yan with the hands. In boxing you touch fist with your opponent. As for when to bow this also varies. Generally it's some ...


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1. Seiza gender differences The prescribed gender differences in seiza one sometimes hears stem from traditional Japanese seating etiquette, analogous to sitting sidesaddle/astride in equestrianism, or with legs crossed/spread on a chair. These differences are echoed in texts on other traditional Japanese practices which involve seiza e.g. buddhism, chado, ...


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The traditional way to sit for men is indeed with 2 fists in between. Women can choose to close their legs but should definitely not be forced to. The placing of the hands is with your hands facing each other, placed on the end of your Judogi. You put your elbows outward. When you bow you simply place your hands in front of you the same way they are placed ...


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I feel that this question can be split in two sub-questions: Is shaking hands bad etiquette in Japan? Does this apply to (Japanese) Judo? While I have trained in Judo for a few years, my best insight for this question comes from my current training at a Kyokushin dojo. As such, I feel like I can readily answer (1), but probably not (2). In Kyokushin ...


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Some info from the IJF regarding what they consider appropriate bowing etiquette during matches: RESPECT FOR THE FIGHT CEREMONY The ceremony of the bow was formalized by the IJF Education Commission. It must be scrupulously observed. The bows and particularly the bow to the opponent at the beginning of the fight must be respected rigorously and it is ...


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It seems a lot of myths are being perpetuated here. Many answers are correct - but in martial context can only apply to a greeting as might be done when entering or exiting the kwoon, or greeting Sifu. But as to Japanese kata, the context of the question, and also Korean poomsae/hyung, the covered fist has absolutely nothing to do with greetings, war and ...


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This hand posture is also found associated with the sho chiku bai (pine, bamboo, plum) formations as seen at this link: http://www.skski.net/sho-chiku-bai-mon.html. More details about that can be found there, as well. In Morihei Ueshiba's book on aikido talks about the sho chiku bai throughout its pages, but doesn't discuss the hand postures: http://www....


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