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13

It's hard to tell without examining or testing the actual item, but I'm skeptical that they would be the same. It's marketed as a "novelty", which is often used as shorthand for "not intended for regular use", and which suggests that the straps and sides of the bag probably aren't engineered to actually hold the weight of a properly ...


6

There is a judo version of this question about the difference between a sensei (mentor) and coach (cornerman). The United States Judo Federation has a long answer to this question that considers the cultural history and etymology of these words, what functions they perform, and how the roles may overlap, but basically comes to the conclusion that the ...


6

If you are sparring hard and you get hit, you don't have the time to pause and call your family doctor. I want to know how experts (i.e., those who have serious sparring experience) deal with this. I'm an advocate for training hard, sometimes really hard. But in doing so you shouldn't lose perspective - there is no point continuing the hard training if it ...


5

It's definitely not the same. But that doesn't mean it's bad. Many punching bags are much too soft or hard for certain types of training. Similarly, many are too light or heavy. If you are training to box, you need to match your bag to the weight class of your opponents. During training, you can use bags of different weights, densities, and styles to help ...


5

I think it depends on what you expect to train. If you want to train impact, you need something firm and heavy. If you just need a surface with a little resistance and some heft to practice learning what it feels like to make impact, it doesn't matter. What matters about any tool, in any craft or discipline, is what results you expect it to produce.


5

Apologies for the late answer. While I am shadow boxing, I always wonder if it's necessary to ... Yes. It is absolutely necessary that you do everything in your shadowboxing that you would do in your sparring sessions or fights. If you like throwing the spinning side kick when you are sparring, you must throw hundreds of them when you are shadowboxing. The ...


5

Not "spinning around", but "Rolling with the Punches" I think the term you are looking for is "rolling with the punches" (widely known as the "shoulder roll"). When you roll with the punches, you effectively reduce the impact of those punches by a decent amount. But note that you cannot just stand there and roll (or ...


4

Don't use bands: Whatever you do, I suggest you don't use any bands. If your body mechanics work a certain way, you need to consciously work on it if you want to change it. Artificially restricting your legs to move a certain way is likely to cause injuries and unnecessary strain on the joints. When you shadowbox, go hard and fast so you get tired, and then ...


2

I took boxing classes at Peter Welch's gym in South Boston. Seemed like in every class, he said, "smart feet, smart fighter". Actually, it sounded like "smarht feet, smarht fighter". Footwork He drilled into us that foot placement was critical for getting the most power out of a punch with the correct amount of effort. To change having a wide stance all ...


2

Touching back on earlier questions about conditioning, there really is no need to do extensive hand conditioning in preparation for fighting. The fact of the matter is that you're not likely to ever be in a fight, the fight will likely last less than a minute, and if you do have to fight, you'll have bigger concerns than split knuckles. That said, the key is ...


2

Dizziness is usually associated with spinning the body, and this is caused by upsetting the balance detectors inside the ears. This can be relieved to some extent by spinning the other way. The effect of being punched in the jaw is not the same although it may feel similar. It is called Concussion and is caused by the brain hitting the side of the skull. ...


2

The questions asks which martial art to start with if the focus is on self-defense: Boxing, Taekwondo, or Judo. Well first, I'd like you to read what I wrote in my answer at the following link: why a perfect expert and trained taekwondo player or martial artist fear fights? Read that answer and read the links that it also listed. You might also want to look ...


2

Does bicep development affect punching power? Yes, it does. I can't give you an explanation based on physics or biology; I will try to explain this in simple terms. Here is how bicep development can affect punching power Where do you punch from? Are your hands inside your jacket pockets before you take them out and punch? No. Your hands are up high! They ...


2

Been training MMA, boxing, Muay Thai for a couple years. I feel like leaning is an extension of hip flexibility, power and (for lack of a better word) snappiness. Great dodge is a combination of: head movement, footwork and the hip lean that you seem to be describing. I think that it all comes together. Moving your head out of the way seems like a head ...


2

First of all to answer this we need to think about what a knockout is. A Knockout is not a medical term. It is a competition term. The term's use varies between competition styles, but basically it amounts to this: A Knockout is when your opponent can no longer continue to fight you. So while your opponent may be unconscious they don't have to be. For ...


1

No Boxing rules require striking with the knuckles, which will render illegal both hammerfists and backfists. More specifically, from the USA Boxing National Rule Book, and their list of boxing fouls (emphasis mine): Hitting with open glove, the inside of the glove, wrist or side of the hand Of course, if you go back far enough, I'm sure there have been ...


1

As always, it depends. Some points on the body may cause knock out if you hit them. The more precise you hit, the less power you need. Knock out is often a matter of nerve strikes. So your highschool guy had some experience hitting them. If you hit someone away from these points, it hurts, it may break bones or rip tissue. So the pain makes them more or less ...


1

I was experimenting on that for some time, and, from my opinion - NO, biceps generally does not affect punching power. What biceps decreases - your punching speed (if you do not do stretching exercises for your arms! As Philip mentioned in comments, that can give you both strength and speed) - just because with increased biceps it's harder(and so, consuming ...


1

Muscles operate by contractings, so... it's hard to imagine. I can't visualize a punch that changes the lower-to-upper arm angle from a larger to a smaller angle unless it's an awkward sucker-punch haymaker from down at your side to head height. For me, at least, a twisty hook/uppercut to the abdomen leaves the angle about the same. There are lots of other ...


1

On the off chance that the question is not about training to deal with a knockout punch by practicing spinning to get used to the feeling of a knockout blow, spinning with the blow is something you will sometimes see people when struck on the jaw because moving with the blow helps to reduce the force. If you’ve ever sparred a pro before, you’ll find that it’...


1

Mentors talk about the question. Cornermen answer the question and solve the problem. Thank you for making that so clear. I prefer a cornerman.


1

Indeed he is a unique fighter. Roy Jones Jr is the closest fighter to Prince Naz in terms of boxing style. IMO, Roy and Naz are undefeated in their prime but got carried away with their success.


1

I will suggest you to have gloves that have a lot of wrist support and does not break upon impact. For that you may read other answers, but Hayabusa pro gloves could be the best fit for your needs.


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