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2

Some of the claimed differences between horizontal and vertical punches do not exist. There are many competing claims about the utility of each, but you can test these claims and arrive at your own conclusions by analysing each claim at home right now or when you're next at the gym. (The claims I make here are based on honest appraisal of my own biomechanics....


4

There are lots of different ways to punch: There's perfectly vertical like kung-fu / wing-chun does it, also known as a "half-twisting" punch. There's the 3/4 twisting punch like your krav-maga and Okinawan karate tends to do. There's perfectly horizontal like Japanese karate and Taekwondo does it, also known as the "full twisting" punch. ...


1

I see two benefits to rotating the fist to a horizontal position: You get a little more range, and The shoulder is raised automatically as the wrist rotates, providing valuable cover for your chin and, to some extent, the temple. As for the knuckles hitting the wall, and bending the wrist, and all that: forget it. In reality, you are not trying to knock ...


2

It may have less to do with the wrist, and more to do with the elbow and shoulder. The rotation involved in a horizontal fist tends to stack the elbow and shoulder into the punch more than a vertical fist, making it easier to use your torso musculature to add power to the punch, and providing more of a stiff frame to deal with recoil. The horizontal fist ...


2

Further to Macaco's answer... This is yet another example of where both techniques have merit. Near-full extension and partial extension both replicate different combat circumstances. To practice only one of these exclusively is to prepare well for one set of circumstances whilst neglecting the other. Despite the fact that many top fighters seem to ...


5

I was taught to not strike at full extension because of the risk of hyperextending the limbs due to a lack of resistance. To avoid this sort of injury, never fully extend (or hyperextend) your elbow joints during shadow boxing (especially if you are punching hard and fast). Your jab gets its speed and power from the rotation of your shoulder joint, not from ...


2

A great question. One of the most effective ways to control a fight is by maintaining the element of surprise; by confusing, frustrating and by doing so, greatly incapacitating your opponent. By being unpredictable, you take the initiative, and a fighter who is constantly being forced to respond to his or her opponent will always find it a lot more difficult ...


-1

Sure you can, but it will most likely not help you achieve your goal of saving money. This is because your gloves will wear way faster if used on a bag, which would in turn make you have to buy new gloves more frequently. I suggest you use bag gloves or just bandages, which you need anyways. A little less padding/wrist support while working the bag can be a ...


0

Just my opinions from my experience: Lighter MMA-style gloves still let me punch hard and get a fun and satisfying "thwock" sensation back thru my knuckles. I'll never get in a real fight, but I don't wrap my wrists since it's important to learn how to keep straight wrists when hitting hard and when tired. And open-fingered or lighter gloves will ...


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