22

I don't think the science is settled to a degree where we can give a solid answer, or make too many specific conclusions. Disclaimer: I'm not a kickboxer, and I haven't studied the subject deeply. Dementia pugilistica Getting hit in the head is not good for your brain. Getting hit a lot in the head is very bad for your brain. That's true regardless of ...


11

Heavyweight fighters are more susceptible to knock-outs. It's why heavyweight fights sell better than lightweight fights. Fans want to see a knock-out. Heavyweights generally hit harder than lightweights, because they have more muscle and more mass behind their punches than lightweight fighters do. When they're being punched at, heavyweights are slower to ...


11

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


9

Yes, playing judo introduces the risk of brain injury. Judo is a contact sport. Competitive judo is a very contact sport. If you play rough and don't take ukemi properly, you risk concussion. The risk is not as great as in boxing or striking arts. The risk is manageable for nearly all trainees, especially people who don't compete at the elite levels or who ...


9

Yes, there is scientific evidence that boxing is harmful to the head - Amateur/Olympic boxers show cerebrospinal fluid changes indicative of neural injury Neurochemical aftermath of boxing (Note - Some same authors) Seminar on boxing damage, recognition and intervention Abstract only - K-D test for head trauma in boxers/mma Given the spotlight shined ...


8

Head injuries in Judo and possible differences between Judo and BJJ The studies1 quoted in this answer about head and neck injuries in judo come to the conclusion that: severe injuries in judo are rare, but when they do occur they are mostly to the brain and spine, mostly occur during throws (as opposed to chokes), and mostly occur due to 'bad falling' ...


8

My first piece of advice is to see a doctor. If you are suffering something other than a concussion, that's important to know. However, if you are suffering concussions, you are risking your health in a serious way, and that's even more important to know. Concussions ARE brain damage All the current science points to the fact that concussions produce ...


8

An analysis of the literature in 2006 presented data for a number of team and individual contact sports. Concussions in boxing were identified at a rate of 0.8/10 rounds (for pros) or 7.9/1000 man-minutes (amateur). So in a pro bout you can expect one guy or the other to be concussed on average, and one guy or the other to be concussed per hour on average ...


8

The biggest risk with concussions is getting a second one shortly after the first. For competetive boxers and kickboxers, this means the 10 count and standing 8 count are sentencing them to long term brain damage. If you're training casually, wearing very good headgear (Winning FG-2900 if you can afford it, Rival d3o would seem to be a good second choice) ...


7

I think that style is less relevant than Sensei. I don't practice either TKD or karate, but I believe that the most important factor in determining whether you'll take the kind of blows you want to avoid is the instructor (and the senior students). Watch a few classes. In particular watch juniors sparring and look for evidence that they're being observed ...


7

Based on this NYTimes article: The frequency of judo deaths in Japan gives 108 deaths since 1983. I will not paraphrase the article but other nationality report no deaths in the last decade or so. I am going to assume that those deaths were directly resulting from judo and not just happened while judo was going on. Thus your risk of dying are increased if ...


5

Yes, there's a danger of concussion. My answer to another question on concusssions. Do you know what sports end up getting a surprising amount of concussions? Soccer and volleyball. It's not because these folks are getting hit in the head all the time - it's just that when they do get hit, they have had little conditioning to help deal with the blow. Any ...


5

I'm curious as to how you didn't manage to find studies. I did a standard Google search and came up with reputable organizations dedicated to the study and treatment of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Dementia Pugilistica. Traumatic Brain Injury Dementia Pugilistica Revisited Dementia Pugilistica Frequently Asked Questions about CTE What Is CTE? ...


5

According to the following paper, Injuries in judo: a systematic literature review including suggestions for prevention: severe injuries in judo are rare, but when they do occur they are mostly to the brain and spine, mostly occur during throws (as opposed to chokes), and mostly occur due to 'bad falling' repeatedly being thrown (as a competitive judoka) ...


5

Several sports aside boxing and martial arts (such as soccer, rugby, ice hockey) have the potential to cause damage. So, the risks are real and clear (for example: Kickboxing sport as a new cause of traumatic brain injury-mediated hypopituitarism), as they are for any sports that allows contact. That said, how severe the risk is? This is a difficult ...


5

Specific advice Between karate and Tae Kwon Do, it very much matters what style of karate, and how each school trains. You'll want to avoid a competitive school. Go to the schools nearby and ask them how they spar. If they train knock-down or full-contact sparring, you'll want to go somewhere else. The risk for concussion and brain damage is slight, but ...


5

What is a concussion? In the last few years we've gotten a lot more info on them, and literally, they are brain damage. What makes them especially dangerous is that concussions can be extremely unpredictable in terms of cause to effect - sure, getting hit harder in the head is worse, but sometimes lighter hits can cause severe concussions or heavier hits ...


4

I also think it's worth mentioning that if you are a beginner then you should either, not be sparring until you learn proper technique, tactics, and defense, or spar with someone of your same level. Frankly, as a kickboxer, if you are sparring with someone who rings your bell two or three times each session, then you are sparring with someone who is too ...


4

The All Japan Judo Federation basic instructor course is 2 days of lectures followed by essay questions (at least when I took it last year). There is an extensive section on head injuries, as almost all the deaths mentioned above were as a ressult of head trauma. Primarily multiple blows to the back of the head by unsupervised children, but also, rarely by ...


4

Currently there's no diagnostic assay for CTE. There's no treatment, nor is there any cure, either. According to Alzheimer's Association, the symptoms of CTE include: Memory loss. Confusion. Personality changes (including depression and suicidal thoughts). Erratic behavior (including aggression). Problems paying attention and organizing thoughts. ...


3

Since you don't compete, and you're sparring once a week, you probably aren't taking enough damage to cause noticeable long term affects. One issue is the shots don't always have to hurt to cause brain damage. Any "bouncing" of the head causes damage. Jet ski riders and slalom skiers have been shown to have some of the worst brain damage of all athletes, ...


3

Deliberately avoiding CTE issue - I will let someone else find/do the studies Looking at your own sparring - learn your distance! If you are sparring light/touch contact then yes you need to control techniques (not just to the head). This does not mean attacking slower - you want to still move at full speed - just retract the hand/foot at the point of ...


3

Getting hit in the head is definitely bad Most people are worried about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which can bring terrible things including loss of coordination, memory loss, depression, and dementia. CTE was described as dementia pugilistica in boxers in 1928, well after gloves were introduced. Boxing in the UK from 1929-1955 had a reported ...


2

Possible explanations: Your source did not do a study Your source did not cite a study Your source's studies were not peer reviewed Your sources compared different styles and rules Your sources referenced studies done in different time periods, between which the understanding of head injury had changed You misinterpreted the source(s) Your source ...


2

Headgear prevents cuts, not concussions The study of AIBA headgear in tournaments is useful to you. The story according to this paper is that headgear increases referee stoppages (paper's proxy for concussion) but is useful for preventing cuts. Headgear was apparently designed for preventing cuts. From the introduction: These head guards were never ...


2

Here is Scientific evidence that punches to the head are harmful in boxing: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3296090 Guterman, A. and Robert W. Smith. "Neurological Sequalae of Boxing." Sports Medicine, Sports Med. 1987 May-Jun;4(3):194-210. "Blunt trauma to the head results in acceleration of the brain within the skull. This takes 2 forms: linear or ...


2

In short, yes. There's always that danger. When you're training with experienced partners, this danger is near to none, as they know how to measure hit strength. However, if you train with beginners, even if it's light hits, they don't know how to measure hit strength yet, and may actually hit quite hard without intending to. When training with only ...


2

You should stop training IMMEDIATELY I mean, is it something that always occurs, or is it incidental? Sometimes when I'm hit well (about 2 - 3 times every training), I see stars and feel a little lightheaded. You are getting hit too hard too frequently. This is not normal or acceptable, neither for casual nor professional athletes. Also it is not ...


2

What you are talking about sounds like a disruption to the vestibular system of the inner ear. Some people are particularly sensitive to disequilibrium from abrupt motion. If this is the case for you, I would recommend seeing an ENT physician. They should be able to run some test and perhaps prescribe medication to mitigate the vertigo. If you want to try ...


1

The highlighted concerns is head first landings may potentially cause long term brain injury Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) Wikipedia give a general idea of CTE. It is a progressive degenerative disease found in people who have had a severe blow or repeated blows to the head. CTE has been most commonly found in professional athletes ...


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