12

You do not purposefully give your back. You do not "give" anything. Applied correctly, your back is safe. There are some misconceptions here. You do not simply "give your back". Throwing is something you should only do when you are in control of your own and your opponent's balance. It is fast, it is powerful, and it may well break your opponent's hip when ...


11

Today we focused on some details of escaping mount. This involves controlling the opponent's hips with your arms. Good luck doing that in a MMA fight when your head is being caved in with ground and pound. Being under mount is bad. There's no rule that says that you can escape without exposing yourself to strikes or submissions. Saying "I want to escape ...


7

Allowing slams (and hence teaching DEFENSE against slams) seems to be a crucial part of BJJ. But [they] don't they train that. Every BJJ gym I've trained at for more than a couple months has taught me how to prevent and defend against slams. Techniques to prevent being slammed were in three of the first BJJ instructional videos I watched. Most BJJ purple ...


6

While my background is Karate, rather than BJJ, hopefully this answers at least part of your question. The first thing to remember is that this is a specialised technique. As I tell my students: 90% of the time, you'll be using the first 10% of the syllabus. That is, after all, why we teach those techniques first - they are relatively simple to learn and ...


6

BJJ inherits this treatment of striking in rolling from judo. Strikes were removed from judo randori (free play) because Kano could not figure out a way to train them safely. Only relatively safe techniques were used in randori to allow full-force practice. Striking and defending against striking were relegated to kata (prearranged exercises). The basic ...


6

Is this guy older than you? I roll this way because I am a solid 10-15 years older than most people in my gym. Rolling hard tends to injure people more quickly, and I suspect this person may have had enough of that. I also started working with a defensive mindset years ago. I let people pass my guard and attempt submissions, because I find the experience ...


6

I agree about slowing down. Also, pay attention to what you are doing. If you do any move that would not work on somebody twice your size and strength, then let it go. When with a tiny partner, never crush them with more than a similar body weight to their own. It takes practice, but it makes it more fun. I have never been prouder than when some smaller ...


6

Instead of doing a 'simple' belt knot, I use a variant where you put the ends of the belt between the two layers of the belt while doing the knot. This picture: shows how to do it starting with the upper end, I prefer starting with the one coming from below, but it does not make much of a difference. I've been introduced to this method as 'kata-knot' in ...


6

DO NOT GIVE UP YOUR BACK. Not only is this bad habit in competition, but this can become a bad habit in the case of a real altercation, which could cause serious harm. In competition, as the other answers illustrate, you are very susceptible to a rear-naked choke, and if you would ever develop a habit of that in a real fight situation, you could be hit ...


6

There is a judo version of this question about the difference between a sensei (mentor) and coach (cornerman). The United States Judo Federation has a long answer to this question that considers the cultural history and etymology of these words, what functions they perform, and how the roles may overlap, but basically comes to the conclusion that the ...


6

Usefulness of "dangerous" moves why haven't we seen more people landing badly (or purposefully) on legs and breaking them? Because it's actually really hard to cause damage with these moves, and a lot of that is just luck. They're banned because a small but significant percentage of attempts will, due to a the opponent's split-section reaction ...


6

The orthodox BJJ response to someone on your back with hooks is to first strip the hooks then shuck them off, while protecting the neck. One can do this by standing upright and pushing the hooks down, but the more orthodox method is to bend forward to touch the ground, keeping the hips high, in order to make them slip forward over your shoulders once they ...


5

You absolutely should NOT give up your back in attempt to bait someone into getting in position for a shoulder throw (seoi nage, in judo terms). A competent opponent will break your balance while they are behind you, put you on the ground, and then apply a rear-naked choke (hadaka jime). If your balance is broken, you will not be able to throw. If you want ...


5

It is much easier to learn a proper technique to get out of mount in the first place and adapting it to MMA environment afterwards. One shouldn't learn things doing it in half-measures. It seems you have not yet understood the main premises of BJJ, which hold in MMA as well: 1. Position before submission When you are in a weak position - like being mounted - ...


5

The question asks why some martial arts exist when others are more complete. The answer is: The rule set. It always goes back to the rules. Why something looks the way it does depends on the rule set. Change the rules even a little, and the way a martial art looks can change quite a lot. Do the rules require a gi? Big difference between that style and one ...


4

Rather than engage in mind reading, I suggest you simply talk with this person and ask them to give more resistance. Mutually negotiate some level of resistance and intensity that is beneficial to both.


4

The premise of the question is either incomprehensible or flat wrong. BJJ purple+ belts can pin and immobilize just about any untrained person. In the other direction, it's been shown time and again that you can show any accomplished wrestler a guillotine and rear naked choke and a month later they're submission machines. Grappling arts are not so distinct ...


4

The answer is that it does take a lot longer for BJJ to reach black belt. Typically you can get a black belt in under 4 years for karate, taekwondo, and kung-fu styles. To get a black belt in BJJ, it takes about 10 years. It depends on how often you go, too, and how good of a teacher your instructor is. Time on the mat is one criteria for BJJ rank ...


4

In my BJJ school, we said, "Oss!" with a bow to the teacher and moved our elbows backwards with fists clenched to signify readiness to move on to practice the move after instruction. It's a cool way to have everyone speak in unison and to signify a shift in the action. I never thought about the origin of the word. Outside of class, I've said "oss!" to ...


4

I'm Brazilian and a purple belt in BJJ. What I would say it that it's about experience and some reading. "Oss" or "Ossu" its a Japanese word meaning understood or agreed. The history of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is quite interesting because of it's being an improvement of a Japanese martial art and it has a lot in common with judo and other Japanese martial arts. ...


4

Not a knot style answer, but once you've tied the knot, rather than just pulling the loose ends, grasp the ENDS of the belt firmly, bring your hands together, then pull apart as hard as you can. This creates a tighter and more secure knot. Source - retying belts for kids just about every class.


4

There are two common ways of tying a belt. The simpler is by wrapping one side under in a loop and then tying a simple knot with both ends: However in my experience this style is prone to coming loose, especially in BJJ and ne-waza. The second technique is more stable during rolling/randori: The following video illustrates both versions: How to Tie Your ...


4

Yes. From triangle (sankaku) positions, there is the standard choke with the legs as well as the option to apply armbars. For example, from this side triangle position, if the choke fails, you can either cross body armbar (juji gatame) the near arm, or Kimura (ude garami) the far arm.


4

There are a few positions where you can finish multiple submissions simultaneously or nearly so. Triangle If you look at the triangle as a position, then a lot of other submissions present themselves as co-attacks. The triangle-armbar is the classic; it's often unclear which one does the most work in any given case. The triangle-Kimura is also great fun. ...


3

Why couldn't it be? The question you cite has a long list of characteristics of a McDojo, only one of which is abnormally fast progression. At that, neither "Brazilian Jiu Jitsu" nor even "Gracie Jiu Jitsu" (due to a legal suit within the family) are trademarked terms, so I could run a "BJJ" school with whatever testing requirements I want. In actuality, I'...


3

"However, does this mean that they shouldn't be used for self defense or MMA until you've mastered them?" There are many techniques that involve putting yourself in a "weak" position to execute it. You have interest in BJJ; if you try to do a triangle choke to defend yourself but you're not 100% comfortable with it, you'll probably get some punches to the ...


3

As suggested by an answer that was flagged as spam for excessive promotion and a comment, Jiu Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro is a solid choice. The book is organized around a progression of techniques: survival escapes guard guard passing submissions This viewpoint emphasizes, for example, that the first thing you should learn from the position where ...


3

"Israeli Jiu-Jitsu" seems to appear in two contexts: Describing BJJ and/or Japanese Jujutsu techniques as adapted and incorporated into some styles of Krav Maga (which has its origins in incorporating techniques from a variety of older martial arts: boxing, wrestling, judo etc), e.g. as taught by Roy Elghanayan. Describing Jiu-Jitsu organisations/schools/...


3

I went to a Judo seminar 6 years ago where one of the instructors encouraged me to give up turning 180° when doing hip/shoulder throws. I now do them turning 90°. This is the entry I use for Seoi Nage. On shorter people, I turn that into O Soto Gari. I'll teach people the classic entries for hip/shoulder throws, but I will have them drill these alternate ...


3

Judo throws are HARD to do! You cannot dabble in them. It takes a lot time and patience to develop functional throwing technique. Wrestling is easier to pick up in a shorter amount of time. It's also not good for aging players. Judo is a lifetime sport where your throws can get better with age. I've seen 60 year old folks with amazing throws. If you want ...


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