17

I am an amateur boxer competing so perhaps I can share some insight. Basically breathing technique is a major aspect one needs to learn. You can very quickly gas out (lose your breath, which also leads to a lack of oxygen for your essential muscles). Therefore, we learn to breathe through our noses when you're not tense - i.e. when you jump-rope and such. ...


10

This sort of product will fail to achieve any short term or long term benefits over regular training. In fact, some results show that it can hinder performance. People believe these sorts of products can increase their red blood cell count by reducing oxygen levels, similar to the way training at altitude can increase red blood cell count. The problem is ...


9

Exhaling on a strike is common in many martial arts as well as boxing (most forms of Karate and Tae Kwon Do for example). The purpose of a short sharp exhalation at the end of the technique is to grip the core and "connect" the punch to the body. This helps with both timing and power. For sparring (and thus boxing as well) this has the benefit of ensuring ...


8

No, qigong is not just deep breathing. There are MANY different qigong exercises, so it's impossible to say what the goal of your particular exercise is. Here is a sampling of non-breathing qigong elements: Why move slow When performing the same basic motion slowly versus quickly, there are different muscles involved and different balance considerations. ...


8

Ki (気) does mean "energy" or "mood", but the A (合) is just a shout of enthusiasm (Korean does use the energy+join setup with K'ihap), so no, there's nothing mystical about it any more than a sports team breaking their huddle by shouting something like, "go team!"


7

I do not think it is necessary to seek out and translate primary sources for breathing. My understanding is that taiji, bagua, and xing yi share Daoist qi gong breathing; guidance from any of these sources should be in agreement. The Root of Chinese Qigong by Yang Jwing-Ming uses alternate words (p124) to describe breathing: In the first stage of ...


6

In general, you should be inhaling when raising the arms and exhaling when lowering them. This is taken from the 18 Lohan set which is where the 8 Pieces of Brocade was taken from. When inhaling when raising the arms, you are gathering the chi, when exhaling while lowering, you are sinking the chi to the build the root in the stance, then you have a solid ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


6

There are few reasons for this: remembering to breathe correctly. tightening your core muscles adding additional explosiveness to your punch relieving unnecessary tension in your muscles


6

You are mixing world religions and confusing Chinese chi with Japanese ki. This is problematic. They are different interpretations of mystical force. Since you used the term "kiai" I will speak from the Japanese interpretation since kiai is a Japanese word. The usage and meaning of kiai varies depending on context and origin. The Japanese have many ...


6

As per the provided link, there's a number of factors going on. First of all, a kiai is as much about a forceful exhalation and a focus of purpose as it is actually yelling. Many of the fighters do just that, grunting or exhaling on a heavy strike without actually yelling. One of the other purposes of a kiai is to startle the opponent. In the Octagon, most ...


5

You should not try to match your instructor's breathing rate. This would be like trying to lift the same weight as your weightlifting instructor; it does not make sense to do this because your instructor's body is different from yours. The general advice for basic breathing exercises is to make your breathing relaxed, continuous, deep, and even. Pay ...


5

Don't. Train your skills in class normally, without the mask. Train your conditioning outside of class, by running and sprinting or whatever. Train your strength in the gym by progressively lifting heavier weights using compound movements. The mask is an unproven fad that, even if it does work, would seem to have an effect that is better achieved through ...


5

Controlling breath is important in martial arts, and all exercise in general. Holding your breath is the opposite of that. The short answer is; holding your breath would result in erratic breath to recover. This sounds ridiculous. No fighter would do this. The yoga website explanation is nonsense. It's not a coincidence that they didn't post any ...


5

The kiai, kihap, or "shout" serves many different purposes. It can help provide focus by association (you shout when you strike in practice, so shouting in combat helps you land that prototype strike). It can help provide power (I don't know the mechanism exactly, but shouting or grunting often helps people exert more effort, something to do with ...


4

Besides the inner and outer manifestations of power and focus which are mentioned in the other answers, the yell also has other uses which haven't been mentioned. In two styles, the kiai (japanese) or kihap (korean) have context in sport rules: In Kendo, the attacker must yell the target: men (head), kote (wrist), do (side, waist, body), and tsuki (throat) ...


4

From a purely mechanical perspective, the purpose of a kiai in a punch is to force the abdominal muscles to engage, allowing for the transfer of effort (kinetic energy) from the legs and hips to the chest and arms in event of a punch (providing a backstop in accordance with Newton's Third Law of Motion), allowing more of this power to be delivered to the ...


4

Breathing slowly is trained in Daoist-influenced martial arts Martial arts with a Daoist influence (bagua, xing yi, taiji) train breathing to be relaxed, continuous, deep, and even. Training for these elements has the effect of slowing your breathing rate. Note that you cannot hold your breath while keeping it continuous and even. This training results in ...


4

For the sake of answering, I'm going to assume you're asking "When is the best time to kiai in order to maximize effect?" Leaving aside any psychological benefit, the physiological effect of kiaiing is to tense the diaphragm and firm up the connection between the upper and lower body. Simply put, if there's "wiggle" in your core, a punch ...


4

This is similar to the effect when forcefully exhaling during weightlifting - the forceful exhalation (different to the Valsalva manoeuvre, which is also employed in some situations) creates not only a rigidity in the abdomen which allows for more efficient force transfer, but also increases muscle tension globally. This is useful for the martial arts ...


3

The huff is a quick exhale that brings all the contributing muscles in your body to support that punch you throw. At the same time it prepares your conditioned body to absorb any shock from a counter-punch that could strike your body. This is part of a breathing technique that also ensures a steady supply of oxygen/blood pumped to those strained muscles and ...


3

Huffing while punching is sort of a golden rule which they teach in boxing. The effect of punching without exhaling is much lesser than that of while exhaling. If the boxing classes have very advanced instruments, they show you with the help of a device which calculates the power of your strength. In that it is amazing to find that such a simple thing can ...


3

It all depends in what your intention is. Like the classic text says inhaling gathers chi and exhaling projects chi. Now if you' re practising you want to gather chi to yourself, so you breathe out when pushing down. In healing or in combat however you want to project your chi into something or someone else outside of your body. That's when your breathing ...


3

Try doing this: Every time your arms/body extend/expand, exhale. and every time your arms/body contracts, inhale. Then try this: Every time your arms/body extend/expand, inhale. and Every time your arms/body contracts, exhale. Both work but for different reasons. Think about your intention. Hope this helps. Now go train.


3

Kiai means merging your energy. (Ki = energy, Ai = merge/join/blend/combine.) The short story is that what you're attempting to do is, in the moment that you shout, you merge the ki throughout the body. In kiko (chi-kung) practice, this means circulating the energy from the dantien through the governing and conception vessels and out through to your limbs ...


3

The exhalation is not linked to any particular sports, but a rather profane mechanism: Tensioning of the abdominal muscles reduces the volume of your lower abdomen and thus pushes your diaphragm upwards, which in turn reduces the volume of your lungs so that the air has to go somewhere, voluntarily or not. Any kind of lifting, crunching, or torsion movement ...


2

From an exercise science standpoint, we're looking at a few factors: muscle contraction, breathing efficiency, and metabolic function. The body works better when only contracting or only stretching, not a mix. (The name of this principle escapes me.) So, when you are striking, you are contracting muscles to provide the force of impact, so you want to make ...


2

Getsugatensho? But in all seriousness, a long, controlled expelling of air from the lungs is better than a sudden puff. The reason is that you need relaxed muscles that snap like a whip on impact, rather than tensed muscles, and a sound that constricts your air passage and makes the air move faster promotes that. Which is why a "Kiai" or "Hei" is better than ...


2

Which kind of breath provides the most striking power? Peppermint. The crucial thing for striking is coordinating a transfer of energy between the legs/hips and shoulders/arms (even when kicking, as you're trying to use the inertia/momentum of the upper body to help the hips/legs accelerate). That transfer always involves the "gut" muscles. Whether they'...


2

It's often hard to get a good sense of what to do, in a practical sense, from classical tai chi texts. Their flowery language, extensive use of metaphor, references to connotations we aren't familiar with, and use of the obfuscatory term "chi" all contribute to this. The rule of thumb for fighting is to usually exhale when striking or making an explosive ...


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