10

That quotation is from the "Dedication" on the inside cover of Lee's "Tao of Jeet Kune Do" It reads, "This book is dedicated to the free, creative martial artist: 'Research your own experience; absorb what is useful, reject what is useless and add what is essentially your own.' " That may also appear elsewhere in the book, but I could not find it while ...


8

Bruce Lee's training partner, Dan Inosanto, gives some insight in an interview for the book The Masters Speak in regards to forms (emphasis mine): Q: What do you think about forms? A: I have to say that Bruce was not anti-form and neither am I. Forms or katas are a way to learning proper body mechanics. Forms can be a part of your training, but your ...


6

Source of quote Bruce read widely and took aphorisms from many different sources, incorporating them into his writings on his own martial arts and philosophy. The idea behind this quote is ancient,1 but this specific wording appears to come from Mao Zedong: All military laws and military theories which are in the nature of principles are the experience ...


5

According to the wikiquote page for this, the origin of the quote is given for the book Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee's Wisdom for Daily Living, published in 2000 and edited by John Little, Part III Part II. (Thanks to @ukemi for the correct section reference) Part III : On Matters of Existence Part Two - On Being Human - Concepts (Abstracting) Balance your ...


4

According to the Bruce Lee Family website (run by his daughter, Shannon Lee), Emotional Content: What did Bruce Lee mean by “Emotional Content?” He was describing the feeling of being totally present in your body and connected to your own life force. A spiritual life force that is the energy of creation. This force helps you become a human being from moment ...


4

This quote can be found in Part Two - On Being Human - Concepts (Abstracting) of Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee's Wisdom for Daily Living (p43): Balance your thoughts with action. — If you spend too much time thinking about a thing, you'll never get it done. In the introduction, A Book For Free Spirits, John Little writes this of the sources of the quotes: ...


3

While Steve and Mattm's answer are excellent and do a great job of putting the quote into the context of Bruce Lee's life, I would like to add my take on it. Bruce Lee's quote is not aimed at beginners (aka 2/3 years of training) but at those that already learned the basics of an art (whatever that art is, shodan or 3/4 years of training) and are now ...


3

I think what Bruce Lee and those who have said similar things both before and after him are getting at is that it's a process, not a set product. Through this process, you take what seems to work "better" at the time you're testing it, and you discard the "worse" which came before. At any point in that journey, you can never say you've found the ultimate ...


3

Fighting Specialization: Everyone cannot excel at everything Ultimately, you do not need many techniques to win a fight. What is the point of studying all of the kicks if you only need a handful, and learning all of them distracts from becoming good at a few? You are better off specializing in the handful of techniques and becoming proficient in them. ...


3

I'm cantonese It's pronounced: Tai 'cake' kuen Taichi chuen is mandarin


2

The site mdbg has audio of native Mandarin and Cantonese speakers. See the entry for taijiquan. You need to click on the characters for taijiquan as below in the screenshot to access the audio, which is circled for Cantonese in red. Unfortunately, the middle word is missing Cantonese audio.


2

On the mental side, I always interpreted the quote as empty your cup metaphor. In effect, it suggests one should abandon one's preconceptions and "just" train what is shown. Many times, whoever teaches shows something that seems to be pointless, unnecessary, and even a hindrance. However, generally there is a set of reasons why a student should do this. ...


2

To be fair, you would have to catalog every technique from every movie (3, I think) and assign them to a "style" (but what's the point?). My immediate response, though, is that Lee's predominant techniques came from Wing Chun (trapping, straight blast) and boxing (obviously NOT Wing Chun, refer to Muhammad Ali). His kicking is harder to place, ...


1

It depends on whether you go by the spirit of Bruce Lee's philosophy or the letter of this quote. If you read commentaries on what exactly he meant by this quote, such as this one as an example, this will probably yield better understanding, because unfortunately, the wording is ambiguous taken in isolation. It could be read as follows: using no [X as X] - ...


1

Fundamentally, Bruce Lee was discussing being flexible in one's training and practice of the martial arts. It's not a specific technique, but rather always being willing to consider the situation, to choose the right approach for every situation rather than to decide on a best approach and then apply it everywhere. Specifically within martial arts, this ...


1

Hanzi: 太極拳 Cantonese: taai3 gik6 kyun4 (Jyutping) IPA: /tʰāːi. kìk̚. kʰy̭ːn/ IPA: /tʰaːi. kik̚. kʰyːn/ (without tone diacritics)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible