8

This is a tricky, and somewhat subjective question to answer, and unfortunately, I don't have much more than anecdotal data. Is fight effectiveness or personal defense an important goal for modern Capoeira? Generally, no. Much like most modern martial arts from Tae Kwan Do to Kung Fu to Kickboxing, people primarily study Capoeira for the purpose of ...


8

Virtually all of the martial arts use the hands in some way. Even Taekwondo, which uses mostly kicks during sparring, will use the hands to block and punch. Whereas, grappling arts use the hands to grab onto the gi or wrists or whatever. It's not uncommon in Brazilian Jiujitsu or Judo to sprain your pinky and ring fingers due to the fact that your grip ...


5

Not sure what you mean by crab walk, but I guess I could kinda see why you would call it that. Here's a shoulder flexibility exercise for the range of motion the two movements you mention involve: stand straight, feet together prepatory stretching: interlock your fingers, arms straight above head, palm out facing sky lean back as far as you can go, ...


5

Let me preface by saying that without seeing your movement, it's hard to say what you're doing wrong. So, assuming that you're doing the movements with a close approximation of "the right way", it probably boils down to flexibility. I would just work on Ginga and maybe Esquiva for a while, throwing in some dynamic stretching kicks (try to kick your ...


5

In summary, you're attempting to regain some kicking ability that you once had but have lost due to inactivity and lack of practice. Your goals are to improve range of motion and flexibility, speed, and control even when holding your kick in place without moving at all. And you'd like to even surpass your abilities when you were once in regular practice. Yet,...


4

Step back away from the kick, or step closer to the attacker's body. If that kick always starts from a crouching position, it would be fairly obvious that your opponent is moving to that position, giving you time to move in or away. If you do step closer, the only thing supporting him appears to be one hand; take out his support and you're in a winning ...


4

I practice traditional japanese karate. I broke my middle finger and had to have surgery. I still practice. I practice with another karateka who is missing his entire left arm and another karateka who is missing a hand. In traditional Okinawa karate-do, having a missing or non working limb makes no difference to the practitioner. PS. My friend who is ...


4

Esquiva part of Queixada is called "Finta de Queixada". Queixada is a two stages capoeira kick : - First we do a "esquiva de lado" - Then we do the kick But if you're only doing the "esquiva de lado" part of the Queixada, you are not trying to do an esquiva but a finta (making one thinking you're about to do the kick, but transform and do something else). ...


3

Like any activity where you want to make those kinds of improvements; Visualisation is your friend. See yourself in your mind making those sequence links and keeping low. Do this over and over to get comfortable in your mind that you will be able to do the moves you want. The other thing is flexibility and strength. Both can be worked on separately, holding ...


3

In our academia berimbaus are hanging on a wall unstrung. Generally, we do not remove the string from the "tuning" end, we just let it loose but it's still wrapped around the upper part. In other words, it looks almost like tuned berimbau except that string is not tightened.


3

From what I read in your post, you might be talking about the Axe Kick. It's a kick where you swing your leg up as far as possible and then kick the opponents head or chest from above with your heel. It is technically possible to turn a roundhouse kick into an axe kick to surprise your opponent, although a lot of the initial energy of the kick will be lost. ...


3

Everyone is talking about strength… good but unnecessary. It is good to have strong arms—and I am pretty sure you already do—to hold you up upside-down. But if you have the wrong technique, strength will always fail. If not, how does water continually seep into rocks when rocks have spent all their evolution perfecting the art of hardness? The key/idea ...


3

Heh. Interestingly enough, where I was taught, the primary difference between negativa and resistência was the foot positioning with resistência being the flatfooted one. Just goes to show that the terminology varies a lot between schools. I'm not familiar with passa de frente, but I assume it is something like a queda de quatro as seen in this video. In ...


3

Possible reasons: As mentioned by kioopi, momentum and effort. Moving the upper leg requires displacing it further upwards and increases the shear load on the supporting arm. Leading with the lower leg predisposes your front torso to be facing your opponent. Leading with the top leg predisposes you to wind up with your back towards the opponent. While it is ...


2

We have one berimbau in academia which got broken in the middle. People put some glue there and wrapped it with a thick cord pretty tightly (the kind which is used for atabaque). So far it's holding up but it has to be tuned carefully. So, in the long term, you can't avoid replacing the verga.


2

1) Ginga a lot. 2) Do variations: Slow Fast Very low Very stiff Let your chest nearly touch your knees while doing the Ginga Switch directions Stop and reverse in mid-movement Do esquivas/cocorinhas while doing the Ginga 3) Strength training: Kettle-bell swings Squats Kneeling Squat Jumps


2

I'm starting to suspect that this may be a matter of a combination of appeal to tradition and changes in lacquer / paint technologies. I purchased the berimbau mentioned above and I can't tell any difference in the sound from the lacquered-only berimbau I've played in class.


2

Bryan Garrett proposed doing Benguela games. This might actually something you want to do. As Benguela was designed to help students of Capoeira Contemporânea to develop a low game that then can lead to the game played with toce de angola. ( https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benguela_(capoeira) ). Sequences always change and depend mostly on your teacher (and ...


2

As long as I understood for 20+ years in Capoeira, it primarily is a socializing art. The apt playing in the roda (circle) is the utmost goal of training the art. The most wonderful aspect of Capoeira is: you can throw kicks full speed in quick succession with minimal risk to harm your (trained) opponent or yourself. You couldn't find this in any other ...


2

I asked this question on Reddit and got an answer that this is actually several Cordão de Ouro sequences. There is no written version. The app just broke it down into the individual sequences. It looks like it's now available for Android, but as per the Reddit thread, there's no textual description and, honestly, the low framerate for the sections is mildly ...


2

The name is "Esquiva de lado" ("Sideways esquiva"). It can be used as part of the entrada. Personally I'd call the steps after the esquiva the entrada (picture 3 in your sequence) because there are other ways to get to the steps if you enter after a finta. For a reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuBW3Qp9YHQ


2

I felt kind of down when I first fractured a metacarpal - was worried how well it would heal, but several guys at the dojo reacted along the lines of "oh yeah you too", and in the end it was a bit of a non-event - few weeks' rest and eased back into it. Six months later it was an irrelevancy. Of course, some injuries are worse than others, but my real ...


2

Even if the answer is late: You don't have a beat to coordinate your steps to in capoeira. The rhythm gives you an indication on how fast or how slow to go. BUT: With all the breaks, feints and kicks your timing will never match up to the beat. It's actually a big part of the game to disturb the rhythm of your partner.


1

I learned from my Capoeira's Master when you try apply technique to Capoeira you will lose your ability to improvise and creation. Capoeira is little different from other Martial arts. In this case Capoeira look likes much more with a dance. Your Ginga should flow the songs from the Berimbau. If you are playing Capoeira de Angola you should be fluid like ...


1

I was unable to get ahold of my instructor from Philadelphia, but I did get an answer from one of his senior assistants who said that they always just taught that pivot as the wind-up for the queixada and that there was no distinct name for it. Yes, it's queixada. It's strange to read the technical description. [The] esquiva is part of the queixada. The ...


1

In general, there are four primary ways to counter a kick. Dodge - This can be tricky, since a kick can strike on different levels, but the nature of Capoeira is such that this sort of kick generally defaults to landing somewhere between the waist and head. Leaning the torso back and away from the kick is likely to take the target zone out of consideration, ...


1

I know you said you're training Angola,.. but have you considered trying CDO Miudinho sequences? From my experience, its a great way to rep ground movements.


1

Do the ginga for one hour straight non-stop and your body will adapt to it and you will develop your style. That is an old trick passed down to me by my master and also been advised by students who have visited brazil for capoeira training.


1

I think it's just easier to generate hip momentum with the lower leg. If you can do it with the upper leg first, that might be a nice variation.


1

I advocate balance to strength. As a matter of fact, strength in the shoulders tend to make them rigid. Strong rigid shoulders may cause stress on the deltoids when in such a position (which I know as the "Ponte"). In executing the Queda de Quatro as an "esquiva" you need not stop at the "crab walk" stance ("Ponte"); since capoeira is free-flowing. ...


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