14

I don't have medical studies, but I can at least point you in the right direction of what to look up, based on kinesiology and adult biology. Tendon Plasticity "Tendon Plasticity" (Viscoelastic tissue) - Tendons work somewhat like rubber bands - they have some stretch to them, but if you over-stretch them, just like a rubber band, it ends up loose and ...


13

Most Brazilian Jiujitsu schools do have children's ranks which automatically get turned into adult ranks when they turn 16. So a children's orange belt will become an adult's blue belt automatically at age 16. A children's green belt will automatically become an adult's purple belt at age 16. This is usually how it's done, but a teacher might decide to award ...


12

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


10

There is no official method since every school has different rules. However, it is quite standard to convert all the belts from the yellow up to a blue belt. This is because there is normally no sense in letting these former under-16 people fight against white belts. On the other side, if they are much better than a blue belt they will prove it quickly ...


10

Sounds fine to me. The kid was told exactly what would happen if he disobeyed his instructor one more time. In fact, had the instructor not followed through on his threat to take away his belt, the kid would have learned that his instructor makes hollow threats, and that would invite even more insubordination. There's a reason for this harshness. At 12 ...


9

It's a delicate balancing act; if you don't push and encourage your son, he might not achieve his full potential. If you do push and encourage him, you may end up putting him off martial arts altogether (which is obviously a bad thing, but perhaps even more so for you and your son!) Could your son attend both lessons? That way he would have one class where ...


8

Teaching children in Judo for 13 years now and having made an instructor's license, I will try to pin it down to some principles (as concrete lessons may be established, but are dependent on the group). General principles (all techniques/ages) These principles do not only apply to children (or ukemi), but are more essential to be held in mind and used in ...


7

I talk about this in more detail in my answer here: What Brazilian Jiu Jitsu belt ranking at age 16 after 11 yrs experience? The answer is that most BJJ schools will automatically convert (without need for a test) your children's rank into an adult rank when you reach 16 years old. But as my answer in the link above suggests, the adult rank you actually ...


6

Good question. Children are harder to discipline than adults, because they are more likely to push the boundaries, they are less likely to take responsibility for their actions, and they'll frequently have a parent who thinks the sun shines from their wazoo and their little angel could do no wrong. As their new instructor you have to let them know in no ...


6

I've been in your instructor's position a few times, and I've threatened to demote. But I recognize that taking away a belt can be detrimental in several ways (call me a snowflake if you want). First, a kid works hard for the belt. Then you take it away (or prevent him from wearing it). That's embarrassing. And what have you done? You've let a single ...


5

In addition to Mike P's answer, I would expand the talking to the coach and your son about it. The coach should be able to give you advice and tailor his teaching of your son so that he feels better. It's his role after all. I would do this before the session so he has time to prepare and it does not come as a shock. Forewarned is best! Your son should ...


5

Limbo Haven't gotten really deep into ukemi, but it seems like if you made it a game like limbo, that would be pretty fun for kids. Hold a broom-stick pretty high at first, have them forward roll underneath it. Then lower it as they progress. Then start with it low and have them roll over it. Raise the bar as they progress. This could probably be done ...


5

I'll answer this question from the perspective of a dad and a former martial arts instructor. Your kid is like a lot of other kids it sounds like. It's normal at this age (3 years old) for kids to not be able to concentrate and do what they're told for extended periods of time. A good teacher has to be able to get the kids interested in what he/she is doing....


4

At my taijutsu dojo, the instructors teach basic ukemi to kids as young as seven. The way they approach it is to start by showing it in action with an advanced technique -- like, they'll do a rear sweep on a guy, then point out how that would have hurt if he didn't fall on his back properly, then teach the rear hard fall. So, just like teaching anything: ...


4

I think BJJ is the best because it generally doesn't involve striking, which probably isn't good for kids. Wrestling is another great sport for kids.


4

Suggest you review Patrick Parker's blog (I've linked to a post that is specific to teaching children; it references exercises & games to teach kids). Specifically he mentions How to get kids to slap when they fall and Children's falling exercises, but there is a lot there, and Parker-Shihan is probably the best aikido blogger out there.


4

I'm a 5th Dan in Karate and have been teaching for about 20 years. My advice would be to let him work at his own pace. Martial Arts are a journey, they take a lifetime to master. He has plenty of time to learn and shouldn't be pressured or forced to learn at a pace that is not his own. If you want him to stick with it, then it has to be something he enjoys. ...


4

I will give a bit of a different opinion here even though this already has an accepted answer pointing in the other direction. I think this is wrong. Not so much in the legal sense as Sean Duggan already covered that part. However I think the child's reaction to quit is very much understandable and at the age of 12 I might have done the same. It is common ...


4

I think there are times when demotion of belt is valid as a form of punishment. It would seem in this story that the pupil had been warned this would be the consequences, he chose to ignore it, and paid the price, then got crabby because the punishment threatened was actioned. Suggesting his parents may not usually follow up with the consequences the ...


4

From a strict discipline situation, this makes sense, as Steve states, as it's following up on a previously promised punishment and the kid should be learning proper discipline at that rank. However, from a legal and business perspective, it has issues. First, who owns the belt? The way that most promotion ceremonies are performed, the belt is given to the ...


3

I am a 3rd Dan black belt in Taekwondo. I've taught classes, as well as fought (and medaled) at an international level. When I was in second grade, I was asked to try out for our elite team. I came out of the session in tears about 5 minutes before it ended, and my giving up disqualified me from the team, so I definitely feel a kindred spirit here. My coach "...


3

I'd like to preface anything that I say with the caveat that we are not present in your school, and we don't know the policy of the head instructor/school owner when it comes to things like taking away belts and other disciplinary actions. I am also speaking as a high ranking black belt, and a father of two boys (5 1/2 and 4 years old) that are in classes as ...


3

Please see this other question which asks something similar, but with a 3 year old: Is my 3 year's old reprimand experience in karate today par for the course? Now as for your 9 year old grandson not remembering kata as a brown belt... Brown belt in most karate systems is right before black belt or nearly before black belt. This is considered an ...


3

Judo also has a different system for kids. I think it's because kids lose interest if they aren't getting promotions frequently.


2

Respect must be earned, not simply demanded. I have always had a problem dealing with mental illness. Sometimes people with mental illness tend to push your boundaries quite a lot (ex: OCD), where they have an obsessive compulsion to test you. I have never figured that one out. Other than that, boundaries are pretty easy to set and reinforce, and I ...


2

My kids have been doing Tae Kwon Do for 2 years and just wondering if there was a better system for them for now. At this age your kids should be having fun and developing gross motor skills. Taekwon-do might be great for them depending on the instructor. The instructor needs to instill discipline in the children, and at the same time teach them basic ...


2

not have mastered everything due to their age Age has nothing to do with mastery - mastery is a combination of physical refinement and academic knowledge. So you can do a kick perfectly, but that doesn't mean in itself that you've mastered it - you also have to know how and when to deliver that physically perfect kick. I feel they will become black belts ...


2

I'll give an answer from a completely different point of view. A child who undergoes the stresses of joint locks are subject to the manifestations of injury as described in Bankuei's answer, I have no doubt. But the injury to a child is not relegated to the child, and for different reasons: Children who engage in joint locks should be considered from both ...


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