3

I think in what you have written there are fundamental errors and/or misconceptions. We cannot tell whether this is because of what you understood from what you have been told or what you actually have been told, but that is that. Closed guard The key to control and breaking the posture in a way you can profit from in closed/half guard is not necessarily ...


2

I'm similar. What I do is try to break down their posture as quick as possible, this means holding with your feet is less of a problem. Once broken down I try working off to a side with a arm, and am playing with a Sean Williams guard. If they posture up while I'm trying to break them down. I get aggressive about hunting for a hip bump, if they defend, ...


1

This answer addresses strategy for side control only. Resist the first move with structure When your opponent makes their first move (for example, bridging or shrimping), your control needs to be both strong enough that you can resist without having to reposition your limbs. For example, if your opponent bridges away from you, you need to be able to ...


1

Taking a step back, the main issue you're facing is that your skill level is probably the same as everyone else who you started out with, but they're heavier and stronger than you are, so you're struggling to do things that they can do. This makes you understandably frustrated. So you need to start realizing something important right now. Those guys in your ...


1

The most basic principle of keeping someone within your closed guard is to always keep your hips up. If your hips are on the ground, it is far easier for you opponent to open your guard. Having your hips up also allows you to drop your hips down and pull your knees toward your chest to break your opponent's posture (often combined with opening your opponent'...


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