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29

I suspect that the primary answer lies between that they genuinely deemphasize pitched fighting, and that it's guided by rulesets. Not every martial art is about fighting, or defending yourself For most modern countries today, the odds of actually getting into a fight are pretty low. Even if you do get into a fight, it generally comes down to two people ...


11

The military doesn't care very much about your hand to hand skills, a few months isn't a lot of time to learn, and picking a gym is mostly about which specific gyms are available to you. Your best preparation is probably focusing on running and lifting weights.


10

I suspect there's a lot of instructors that are more concerned about the techniques of their art, rather than flooding their students with ever increasing amount of styles. This makes sense that they don't want to overwhelm their student as well as not wanting to water down their art with other techniques. Macaco Branco goes into that nicely, so I'll try not ...


8

What is shown is a vambrace, or possibly a bracer repurposed to be more armor. A vambrace is a tube of armor, anything from metal to leather, used to protect the forearm. A bracer is intended only to protect the inside of the arm of an archer. What is shown in the image looks more like a bracer, but seems to be intended for use as armor, much like the ...


5

This is a bit like asking whether a physicist wouldn't only be able to become a better scientist and understand more of the bigger picture if they would do chemistry, biology, geology, etc. as well. The truth is: even if possible, they wouldn't necessarily. And it certainly would take an insane amount of effort. Why there is some truth to what you are saying ...


4

As others have mentioned, hand-to-hand combat doesn't play a significant role in modern militaries. If you want to learn a fighting art in the build up to your term of service, I would suggest something like boxing and/or judo. A lot of the training for boxing involves general athleticism and endurance, and if you want to go far in the military you need to ...


4

Taolu (forms) are for a different purpose than Sanda. Sanda and other forms of "free sparring" are centered on the notion that both opponents are free to move around and fight each other using kicking, punching, and blocks, and occasionally also sweeps, throws, and some standing holds. Forms are encapsulations of self-defense techniques, or they ...


3

In addition to the great answers given, I want to provide another angle: It's About Philosophy! Philosophy behind the martial arts include ideas about how fighting "works" and what the main goals of "fighting" are. If a move runs counter to the founding philosophy, it does not get incorporated. "Ignore basic principles of our ...


3

Your claims in the question are quite correct, and none of the contents below intend to refute your statements. There are a few aspects that should be considered when answering this question: What is your primary target? If your target is below chest-level, it would be virtually impossible to use an palm strike without hurting the wrist. I used to be a big ...


3

As far as I am aware, all martial arts systems that teach about the eyes use this practice. This practice corresponds to the use of peripheral vision, as opposed to foveal vision. Foveal vision is more sensitive and allows discernment or color and fine detail in a small area for tasks such as reading, while peripheral vision covers a wide area and ...


3

The question asks for a detailed analysis of Taiji as it compares and contrasts with other martial arts. Looking beyond the specifics, there's an underlying question here about how Taiji is different from other martial arts. If we understand that, maybe it will help answer the specific questions. The first thing to realize about Taiji is that it's an "...


3

Overall Sinking of the joints is one of the core techniques, and a method of directing/re-directing force. It allows directing force even in unexpected directions. Sinking of the joints (wrists, elbows, knees, hips) makes it difficult for an opponent to lock you. "Emptying" is another pillar, and is used both to mitigate impact of strikes, and ...


2

Should Soldiers Learn Hand to Hand Fighting? To say unarmed combat has no place in the military is a misleading and dangerous thing to say. It is still very possible to end up in CQB with enemies, and soldiers do still end up using bayonets for that reason. The tactical axe, often used for breaching doors, has also gained a lot of popularity for its use as ...


2

That depends on the country, but if it's a NATO country, even if you want to enlist as a specops (commando) you will mainly be evaluated on a single criteria : endurance. So running and crossfit could be the the best return on investment to prepare your brand new life. Once you complete the 6 or 9 weeks of basic training to deserve to become a commando (...


2

I've been interested in strategy since early childhood, which led to game theory, which led to AI theory. AI theory is useful in general, and taught me that the best way to think about dimensionality is "degrees of freedom". (Algorithms can think in n-dimensions, 800 dimensions as a example.) One of the lovely things about the "sweet science&...


2

Q: How does competition fighting differ from self-defense? A: The other answers here round out this answer as well. Competition fighting is usually done in a well-controlled environment. The opponents are commonly "fairly" matched by experience and weight, and they are aware that of the intentions of the opposing party. Self-defense relies strongly ...


2

Modern wushu forms and sanda are basically different styles entirely. In my now dated experience with wushu competitions, they have many separate events where the overlap between athletes may be close to zero, especially between forms and fighting. This is true in other ways as well; for example, traditional and modern forms events, and almost everyone ...


2

Considering the viability of short-range grappling techniques, the loss of three inches of range should not be a major concern. The basic grappling strategy is to quickly close distance when entering striking distance, and this strategy works for striking as well. You already have to do this to hit someone in the head because you must move through kicking ...


2

I'm going to rebut some things that you mention. This rebuttal might seem subtle or pedantic, but that subtlety is hugely important. most people using closed fists during a fight run significant risk of hand/knuckle damage It depends on what you mean by most people. If you include untrained people in that group then yes, they do run a risk of injury - but ...


2

It's the hardest thing to do. My teacher was celebrated, but said their technique was the product of 3 generations. That chain seems to be a rare thing, because I don't think anyone in my generation will exceed that generation just prior, BUT, I do think we have the knowledge, expertise, and experience as a community to maintain the arts for another ...


1

Looking at this from a logical perspective, rather than a martial arts perspective: they cannot. If someone wants to blend (picking things out of thin air that don't necessarily make sense) karate and judo to make a more effective fighting style, that style will no longer be karate, or judo. The people who don't join his or her dojo to learn judate will ...


1

Know your enemy and know yourself Understanding how an opponent thinks and their available weapons can determine the best strategy to engage them using your own strengths. For example, fighting a boxer at close range where you can grapple but they cannot punch you effectively may be a better alternative than engaging at punching distance. Psychology Modern ...


1

I feel there's more fairness, safety, yet conflict in competition than self-defense. In competition, it's a consensual, bare-handed, one-on-one fight in a limited space managed by a referee whose job is to prevent serious injuries and deaths. Fighting skills are still useful in self-defense, but since you can't assume many of those conditions, fighting is ...


1

Whether it's sport or "real", fighting is different from self-defense. Self-defense is about dealing with common, everyday scenarios that you might find yourself in. It is "do this if he does that". For example, he puts you in a side head-lock, so you need to hammer strike to his groin, then reach down to his ankle and lift his leg up. ...


1

I can't answer this is in the realm of dueling and fencing, but the experience of the US military fighting Moro rebels in the Philippines is relevant. In the Moro Rebellion, Moro Muslim Juramentados in suicide attacks continued to charge against American soldiers even after being shot. Soldiers would shoot the Moros and mortally wound them, but this ...


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