14

From my own experience, a match between judo/aikido starts at a distance doing Aikido and as soon as the distance closes, switching to judo. I have no link to videos as I never bothered filming any. However, this is what Tomiki found when he started to introduce Judo randori style play into Aikido: his students (who all knew some Judo) would automatically ...


14

Nearly all forms of aikido are predicated on avoiding any possibility of pressure-testing their skills against resisting opponents in free-sparring or competitive environments. Nearly all practitioners stick to demonstration and practice with cooperative partners. From this it naturally follows that few aikidoka will be caught on camera trying to apply their ...


11

There can be too much training, but everything you've described here sounds fine. If a student is overtraining they'll notice decreased performance on the mat, sluggishness all day, difficulty sleeping, persistent hunger, and other signs. Frequent training is fine as long as the student builds up training frequency slowly and remains on point with their ...


10

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


10

Adrenaline is a game changer. The football analogy can be good. You're playing a friendly game, or a training. You won't feel the need to win. For sure, you practice, it's important to feel the stress a little, but in a competitive case, the stress brings a lot of adrenaline which makes you much more reactive to what's happening. The fact that you feel hits ...


10

There are several reasons, but in my opinion, they are somewhat of a cop-out - and yet a relief. Keep in mind, getting into the Olympics is a herculean task: there needs to be a federation representing 75 countries on 4 continents (for men) and 40 countries on 3 continents (for women), anti-doping policies, "modern appeal", media interest, promote gender ...


9

Yes, doing proper breakfalls in judo competition means you increase the likelihood that your opponent will score and achieve higher scores for a given throw. Non-ukemi ukemi Noted judo coach Gerald Lafon has made a lot of noise about how this presents the competitive judoka with contradictory goals: Certainly, the most costly exercise in Judo in terms of ...


9

First, Krav Maga doesn't refer to itself as a martial arts. It's more appropriately called "Self defense tactics system." This might seem like marketing fluff, but the idea is that there is no art to it, and it want's to separate itself from traditional martial arts. Second, there is no sports (also known as competitive) aspect to Krav Maga. Krav Maga ...


9

1) Safety BJJ clubs often don't work takedowns because they regard stand-up work as more dangerous. This is not unreasonable. Even many judo schools will have prepubescent students practice more groundwork than throws. In particular, takedowns require students to pay attention to when they might get thrown, and execute a safe breakfall when they do. Being ...


8

First off, the Chen village invented push hands, so what you see there is the way it is supposed to be played. I've pushed with some guys from Chen village, and real push hands is a lot closer to a combination of judo and sumo. Why do people have such a hard time accepting this? I suspect because its actually hard, and its a lot easier to spend your life ...


8

I've always considered non contact tournaments to be a lottery, but even in full contact matches you will get calls that go against you that you don't agree with - that is the nature of the sport. I would (politely!!) question the organisers and determine whether they have a review process for decisions. If they do then the referees/judges will have to ...


8

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're trying to ...


8

Grappling is not predominant in modern MMA, and hasn't been for a decade or two, so the "matches seem to pivot on one competitor being forced against the cage...moving to the ground, and decided by definitive locks or holds" premise of the question is invalid. MMA matches are overwhelmingly striking contests. Professional competitors in the modern ...


6

First some background on Taekwondo. There are several organizations that certify ranking in Taekwondo. They all kind of look like each other, because they share the same exact roots. They branched off for different reasons, sometimes political, sometimes having to do with the emphasis of various techniques over other techniques, and other reasons. But they ...


6

Judo rules and scoring have changed over the years, so I am providing an update for 2016. Differences from older answers are in pin times and treatment of penalties. Scores There are three positive scores: ippon - a match ends immediately if when an ippon is scored. Referee signals with arm pointing to ceiling. wazari - if a player scores two wazari, ...


6

You can't reliably get good at things you don't practice. In a fight, we don't rise to the level of our expectations. Rather, we fall to the level of our training. Whether it's an eye-poke, strike to the carotid sinus, a chin-push osotogari, or some other dangerous technique, if you never train it against a resisting opponent (that is, in sparring), you won'...


6

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit. There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (One overbearing organization, the IBJJF, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal ...


6

If you are sparring hard and you get hit, you don't have the time to pause and call your family doctor. I want to know how experts (i.e., those who have serious sparring experience) deal with this. I'm an advocate for training hard, sometimes really hard. But in doing so you shouldn't lose perspective - there is no point continuing the hard training if it ...


6

I think Sylvie conveys the right feeling in this article: I’ve fought over 100 times in Thailand and honestly I have never had a completely clear picture of what is and is not a legal throw in Muay Thai. There are some very obvious fouls, but others seem a gray area. I’ve had a vague sense that you cannot lift an opponent, or that you can’t “back break”, ...


5

There are no "secrets" in martial arts. Do you really think that when you reach black belt, some weird man will come at you, hidden in shadows, and teach you a more powerful secret technique that will allow you to beat the best of the world? We aren't in a bad 60s kung-fu movie ... There are techniques that aren't shown to a white belt because they are ...


5

Asking for a strategy upfront is not going to be beneficial, especially on the internet - we have never met this opponent so all we know is he's bigger and stronger than you (and we have no idea how big you are). Train hard. Be confident in your knowledge and capabilities. You should start learning to read your opponents - it's an important skill to have, ...


5

My advice whenever you're facing either someone who's more advanced or bigger is to concentrate on your basic, "high percentage" techniques and be as precise and as quick as you can. Stick to things you know well, and avoid any temptation to do something "cool" or something you've just recently learned. In another answer, I discussed what "high percentage" ...


5

In the WKF 2018 competition rules document, the following are considered valid reasons for disqualification during a kata competition : Not presenting yourself when called Performing the wrong kata or announcing the wrong kata Failing to bow at the beginning and completion of the kata performance A distinct pause or stop in the performance Interference with ...


5

Grabbing neck to throw This is illegal. Judo kata has many techniques that are forbidden in sport judo because it is only safe to practice them in controlled situations. As a referee I would call hansoku-make for IJF SOR: Article 18.5 (hansoku-make) - Prohibited Acts and Penalties To make any action this may endanger or injure the opponent ...


5

For a contrary opinion on "real world fight situations", those often aren't one-on-one. They often devolve into one person grappling the other, and then his friends joining in to beat on their opponent whilst he's held down. Historically that's the purpose of grappling as an unarmed battlefield technique too. If you've lost your weapon (and ...


4

I don't BJJ; however, I do karate and Judo and I agree with reasons previously provided. When I teach Judo, we know the break falls and have good quality mats so throws are executed. Even then, we don't always perform full competition strength throws so that everyone can remain safe and we can continue to train. When I do my karate class, I am even more ...


4

I have a very traditional view on this issue: it's best to take your falls with good ukemi, even in shiai. By all means, try to prevent being thrown, or turn to your stomach and fall with good front ukemi. But using poor falling technique in competition to avoid scores by your opponent is a path to injury, not long-term success. Competitors are better off ...


4

Krav Maga is a relatively new martial art which was developed by Israeli military for military applications, as such it does not have a competitive/sports aspect as with Taekwondo or Seido.


4

In Aikido, the referees will award an ippon based on a good technique from tori's part, however much noise uke makes. If, uke falls over and the technique is rubbish, then all that is awarded is a wazari. There are three judges so even if one cannot see what happens, the other two should be able to. Of course, judges are human and can err but a compliant ...


4

MMA events, unlike the rest you mentioned, are generally not tournament-based, but rather based on planned-well-in-advance ring (cage) fights between pairs of specific fighters. Maybe an MMA promoter near you can schedule you a fight. Before entering a full scheduled ring fight, it would be a good idea to go to an MMA school and ask to have an MMA-rules ...


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