7

Fair warning, this is largely anecdotal, but I think that dancing is useful for most martial artists. Frankly, I think it's useful for most athletes. Dancing teaches you to move in a very precise measured manner, so it definitely improves your smoothness and precision of movement. I also think dancing is good because, frankly, martial artists are often bad ...


5

Sure, learning to dance can be beneficial to martial artists. Anything where you learn to use your body better is beneficial. I had a judo instructor who thought dancing was an easy way to improve footwork. He especially encouraged those with uncoordinated feet to learn to dance. Judo, however, does not spend a lot of time on footwork. On another level, ...


3

Yes, it is possible to become an expert in different martial arts. The first thing to realize is that all martial arts are, are different ways of moving your body. Some martial arts have overlap in their methodologies - and where that happens, it's easy to learn these arts and become good at them without too much extra effort - the baseline skills and ...


3

I've done ballroom dancing and many martial arts. While I did find some things that I could take from one to apply to the other, generally I concluded that they're fundamentally different. Let me explain. In ballroom dancing, a male lead needs to be able to signal to his partner what he's about to do. The signal comes from a solid frame that provides ...


2

Very thought-provoking question. I would say yes, dancing can help. But truly, some forms of dance are out of place in any martial context, and in other cases, dance's benefit is brief or superficial. Other times, it's hugely beneficial. First off, the intention of dance is not at all relevant. Dance is done to convey emotion, while in martial arts, the ...


2

I only have anecdotal evidence to support this, but I have trained with students with experience of dance and/or gymnastics; they are frequently stronger and more flexible than students without experience. They seem to pick up the techniques a lot quicker!. They also seem to have a better idea of how the body works, so their techniques are generally sharper ...


2

Athleticism is athleticism There is no difference between physical preparation for combat arts and physical preparation for sport. One must develop physical attributes. The list of attributes one must develop varies slightly by source, but the basics are fairly consistent. You could use the list of physical training goals from Kurz' Science of Sports ...


1

Tendon remodeling for impact absorbtion One of my best kinesiology and sports medicine instructors also does a lot of instruction at the local circus school - and he noted that folks who do lots of trampoline training end up with stronger tendons and are capable of taking impacts (including on hard surfaces) far better than the average person. So far ...


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