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13 votes

Why do people use the horse stance? Won't it expose you to groin shots?

The question asks why horse stances exist in martial arts in general. The horse stance gets a lot of bad press. Lots of people just make fun of it, saying that it leaves people vulnerable to kicks to ...
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11 votes
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Defence in martial arts in general

One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards ...
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10 votes
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How to defend yourself when you are outclassed?

This is a tricky one to answer without knowing more about your specific situation. If I have misconstrued your question then please add more detail so others don't also get the same impression. Are ...
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10 votes

How to recover from (or defend against) pressure point strikes?

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program initially included an element called Body Hardening. It involved hitting the location of primary nerves. The Radial and Ulna nerves, Femoral and Sciatic nerves, ...
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9 votes

Why do people use the horse stance? Won't it expose you to groin shots?

If you are doing the horse stance, doesn't it just expose you to groin kicks? Yes. So why do people use the horse stance if it is just going to leave them exposed for groin shots? The purpose of ...
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8 votes
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How to recover from (or defend against) pressure point strikes?

It sounds like you're talking about the scientific form of pressure points (as opposed to pseudoscience involving "chi meridians"), namely spots on the body which allow for direct stimulation of ...
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8 votes

How to defend yourself when you are outclassed?

If someone is more willing to fight than you, more athletic than you, and better at fighting than you, you will usually lose. Try not to be in that situation.
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8 votes

The name of a throw where the tori starts from a headlock

This looks like a kouchi-makikomi. In this video's variation, tori is first entering for a sode-tsurikomi-goshi, and tori's head ends up in a similar position to a front headlock. There is no ...
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8 votes
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Defend with leg and knee

The topic pertains to an obscure rule in World Taekwondo rules regarding checking kicks with the knee. The rules state: http://worldtaekwondo.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/WT-Competition-Rules-...
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7 votes
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What techniques exist for blocking knees in a clinch?

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may ...
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  • 1,023
7 votes

Sometimes while fighting, people stand still and let their enemy attack. Why?

It's basically for dramatic effect. In any fight be it competition or self defence or anything else you never stand still. This is to showing to the audience that they can block without moving and ...
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  • 2,840
6 votes
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What is the best way to avoid armlocks?

I would turn this question around and ask: How do people get standing arm-bars and joint locks on the arms of their opponents? Understanding how they do that will give you a good idea about how to ...
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5 votes
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How can I improve my defense speed?

Defense is harder than offense because reaction is slower than action. You have to see and recognize the movement, your brain has to process a response, and then you have to respond. So, there is a ...
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  • 8,553
5 votes
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Defending legs with a sword

The same source text you're quoting mentions the use of Uberlauffen or overrunning as defense against low threats. The idea is to use a Scheitelhau (or a similarly executed thrust) to strike before ...
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  • 166
5 votes
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Sometimes while fighting, people stand still and let their enemy attack. Why?

I don't know about the movies, the reason has more to do with the plot than an actual answer. In the real world, people exhibit one or more of six responses to an attack: fight, flight, freeze, ...
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  • 3,886
5 votes
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What is the name of this throw that starts from a failed guillotine?

It's a suplex (ura-nage in judo terminology). Since standing headlocks are illegal in judo, it is rarely taught from this position, but here is an example of a mechanically similar belly-to-belly ...
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  • 7,292
5 votes

What is an optimal way to evade a punch?

Distance There are human limitations on reaction time (a few tenths of a second) due to the human visual system. If the opponent is close enough to hit you within this time, you will not be able to ...
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4 votes

How to defend against dog attacks?

Let's assume that noise and posturing have failed to dissuade attack from the dog(s), you are completely unarmed, and the dog(s) in question is of sufficient size to pose a real threat of injury or ...
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  • 1,673
4 votes

Defence against Wing Chun

A few things I've noticed from a little striking sparring against wing chun guys... a fast jab around their guard, slightly from the side and arcing as is natural for a side-on fighter, surprisingly ...
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  • 4,210
4 votes

What techniques exist for blocking knees in a clinch?

From the clinch: Close the distance: keep your posture and get your hips close to their hips so there is no way for them to generate the power to throw a knee. Be wary of trips or takedowns, or do ...
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4 votes

Defence in martial arts in general

Sometimes your opponent is faster than you. Sometimes they can read your body language and your tells, and fake you out, or feint. Sometimes you might have patterns that leave you open in ...
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  • 8,553
4 votes

Defending legs with a sword

From a non-HEMA perspective: you want to minimize the time it takes to defend the current attack, while maintaining a position that can still adapt for your own attacks or to defend potential future ...
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  • 13.7k
4 votes

Defending legs with a sword

If we think about things completely in the abstract, slipping the leg while striking the head is a better option: because you're attacking and defending in the same motion it is virtually impossible ...
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4 votes
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Defending non-telegraphed strikes

Yes! The trick is to actually make the non telegraphed attack into a telegraphed one. How? You practice maintaining a one-step distance. This is the distance at which your attacker must make a ...
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  • 2,840
4 votes

Sometimes while fighting, people stand still and let their enemy attack. Why?

Sadly, this happens in most martial arts schools in real life, too. The instructor typically has his partner do something to him, and his partner will just stop immediately afterward. Then the ...
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4 votes
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What is an optimal way to evade a punch?

Your assessment criteria: I will be able to react as fast as possible even to the fastest punch like the jab I will take the minimum amount of damage (if any) Be in a position to react fast to a ...
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  • 4,210
4 votes

Head roll evades strike pre-emptively or after seeing it?

The question is whether head rolling in boxing is something done in response to seeing the strike coming or just done preemptively, without knowing there's a strike coming. The answer is both. It's ...
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4 votes
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Is it possible for your arm to break when blocking punches?

So assuming both fighters are healthy, adult human beings with no bone diseases and no other outside factors are involved. You aren’t breaking your arm this way. It may not be completely impossible, ...
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  • 199
3 votes

What is the liability issuewith personal defense classes?

I think either you or your self-defense instructor are misunderstanding something. If your instructor thinks it's too dangerous to take more than one class with him because of the possibility that you ...
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3 votes

Defence in martial arts in general

The other answers are all pretty good and I won't go over any of that, but nobody has mentioned a fundamental physical fact. Typical time required to throw a punch is about 1/6 of a second. Average ...
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