Hot answers tagged

18

I like the other answers here. Let me just add my take on this subject. I hope I don't offend anyone here. Talking about a style's weaknesses is often a hot button subject. Wing Chun was developed with a particular purpose in mind. And that was to train someone as quickly as possible to be able to fight people who were trained in traditional kung-fu arts ...


14

Pretend chokes The video is of a lame, contrived demo. The "choke" in it is not performed effectively. It's a farce of a choke. The reason this strutting bodybuilder is "immune" to the choke is that it's not a legitimate choke in the first place. If you know someone who thinks they can't be choked, I think Marcelo Garcia would be ...


10

Orthodox wing chun focuses on "trapping" range, between striking range and the clinch. Within many schools' live training (sparring) there is often virtually no throwing, no shots, very little clinch work or kicking, and punching or other hand strikes are often only trained once contact has been made, leaving long-range boxing untrained. The style has ...


10

This is a tricky one to answer without knowing more about your specific situation. If I have misconstrued your question then please add more detail so others don't also get the same impression. Are you a willing participant, or an unwilling one? If you are unwilling, to what degree? Is it just a casual nuisance (someone comes home from training and wants ...


10

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program initially included an element called Body Hardening. It involved hitting the location of primary nerves. The Radial and Ulna nerves, Femoral and Sciatic nerves, and abdominal strikes for the Celiac Plexus. The result was that, after repeated impact over a long period of time, the nerve would become damaged, such that ...


10

One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards you, to calculate an appropriate response, and to begin to move to counter it. (Notice I said "begin" to move, not the complete movement.) If a strike has a ...


9

I'm not sure how much you need to analyze this one. Avoiding scary dogs would be a good start. Dogs attack in a straight line, and they use their teeth (and size/bulk). Other than striking or grabbing the dog's sensitive areas (nose, eyes, throat), you have little option but to bludgeon it with whatever technique you can safely deliver. Of course this is ...


9

Face the dog and stand your ground. The worst thing you can do is to run. The exception is if the dog is far away and you can get somewhere a close a door before he can reach you. Speak or yell at the dog in an authoritative tone. It is usually effective to pick up a stone to throw. Dogs instinctively understand the gesture and when they see you bend over, ...


8

If someone is more willing to fight than you, more athletic than you, and better at fighting than you, you will usually lose. Try not to be in that situation.


8

It sounds like you're talking about the scientific form of pressure points (as opposed to pseudoscience involving "chi meridians"), namely spots on the body which allow for direct stimulation of nerves and muscles to cause a great deal of pain or sometimes even muscle paralysis. As with defending any vulnerable part of your body, the key principles are a) to ...


8

This looks like a kouchi-makikomi. In this video's variation, tori is first entering for a sode-tsurikomi-goshi, and tori's head ends up in a similar position to a front headlock. There is no requirement that uke have a front headlock hold for the throw to be classified as a kouchi-makikomi. The key classification elements to a kouchi-makikomi are: reaping ...


8

The topic pertains to an obscure rule in World Taekwondo rules regarding checking kicks with the knee. The rules state: http://worldtaekwondo.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/WT-Competition-Rules-Interpretation-Manchester-May-15-2019.pdf Article 14 ("Prohibited acts and penalties") Section 4.1.9 ("Butting or attacking with the knee") "...


7

There are four distances at which we fight: Long range. You'll need to perform a jumping attack to close the distance. punching range. I'll lump kicking in here for simplicity. close quarters. This is where Wing Chun is very effective. grappling. Basically anything that is NOT close quarters fighting would be logically effective, but I wouldn't face a ...


7

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may as well hit the chin instead of the chest. If you are locked in the clinch you can try to throw your opponent off balance as soon as they lift their leg to ...


7

It's basically for dramatic effect. In any fight be it competition or self defence or anything else you never stand still. This is to showing to the audience that they can block without moving and so must be much better at fighting than whoever they are facing... which is the point of most of these action films. Sometimes it also drives the plot as in ...


6

Some of the above comments are good; some are not so good. I've had police officers tell me what to do, and I saw one of my MMA friends restrain a dog with a Rear Naked Choke, so here is my experience and knowledge: Wrap a shirt or jacket (Preferably a durable, leather jacket) around one arm. If he bites that arm, shove it all the way down his throat, ...


6

I would turn this question around and ask: How do people get standing arm-bars and joint locks on the arms of their opponents? Understanding how they do that will give you a good idea about how to defend against it. Generally, in order to perform a standing arm-bar or a grapple of some sort on the arm (like a wrist grab and twist), you can break it down ...


5

No, you cannot be immune. IMHO even training to "resist" it is stupid, completely stupid. If someone is choking you out, he WILL succeed, even if you resist for 5 seconds longer. Air choking is easier to notice ( ... you can't breathe) and fighting against your opponent's hold is a lot easier. It will help endure it, allow you to take little bit of air ...


5

First off if you are attacked by a pack of dogs/wolves make sure you are up a strong tree and stay there and call for help. No martial art can help you against being attacked by packs of wild animals. Unfortunately in real life creatures/people do not each attack in turn so it is not like in movies where you can first fight one then the other opponent. So ...


5

Time it better through endless repetitions. Be lighter on your feet. Also, you could instead step in and deliver a straight right to the face. I prefer that to checking. Train it more. You're aware of it now, you'll improve now.


5

Based on the information provided, it sounds like you might benefit from placing more weight on the back leg. When I practice blocking with my lead leg, I find that it works much quicker if the weight distribution is more towards the back leg. It's hard to say without actually watching what you're doing, but it might be helpful to also bend the back leg ...


5

Defense is harder than offense because reaction is slower than action. You have to see and recognize the movement, your brain has to process a response, and then you have to respond. So, there is a limit to how fast your responses can get compared to attacks, even with improvement. You can improve your speed by seeing enough attacks come in from the same ...


5

The same source text you're quoting mentions the use of Uberlauffen or overrunning as defense against low threats. The idea is to use a Scheitelhau (or a similarly executed thrust) to strike before you get hit by the opponent while removing the target. Your blade in the opponent's body would then prevent follow-up attacks. The argument used there is that ...


5

It's a suplex (ura-nage in judo terminology). Since standing headlocks are illegal in judo, it is rarely taught from this position, but here is an example of a mechanically similar belly-to-belly version from a bear-hug: Front Ura nage - Shintaro Higashi Note a front headlock/standing guillotine is generally a very weak position to be in, and while this ...


5

Distance There are human limitations on reaction time (a few tenths of a second) due to the human visual system. If the opponent is close enough to hit you within this time, you will not be able to react on sight. If you want to avoid getting hit, maintain distance. Maintaining distance obviously is in conflict with counterattacking; presumably you do not ...


5

Your assessment criteria: I will be able to react as fast as possible even to the fastest punch like the jab I will take the minimum amount of damage (if any) Be in a position to react fast to a counter strike (or attack simultaneously with opponent's strike if possible) And your defensive options: dodging, parrying, blocking or stepping back (so that you ...


4

Let's assume that noise and posturing have failed to dissuade attack from the dog(s), you are completely unarmed, and the dog(s) in question is of sufficient size to pose a real threat of injury or death. I think scenarios 1 and 3 will have the same answer. There isn't really a functional difference between the motives for aggression and both a rabid ...


4

A long sharp knife is best. Also steel-toed boots for kicking out their teeth. Don't bother trying to run away because dogs are faster. They also rarely respond to simple pain. As someone else said, it's a good idea to wrap an item of clothing around your non-dominant hand to act as a sort of "shield". Stab the eyes and then cut the throat. Kick the teeth ...


4

A few things I've noticed from a little striking sparring against wing chun guys... a fast jab around their guard, slightly from the side and arcing as is natural for a side-on fighter, surprisingly worked really well as long as I didn't do it so much that it became predictable their stance is frontal and shallow (from front toe to back heel), so they have ...


4

From the clinch: Close the distance: keep your posture and get your hips close to their hips so there is no way for them to generate the power to throw a knee. Be wary of trips or takedowns, or do them yourself. Trip them to the opposite side: when they do a knee, especially one from the side, rotate them rotating them in the direction of their standing leg....


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