11

Martial arts are a journey on your own path, at your own time and speed. I have (or have had) a number of students with wide ranging issues with co-ordination, flexibility and movement. As an instructor it is very important for me to take these things into consideration when running the class - perhaps demonstrating things more slowly - or giving alternate ...


5

I prefer to be left hand forward, if I am hit in the right eye (and it swells/vision blurred etc.) I feel able to carry on. If I lose some vision in my left eye, I struggle much more, I have to turn my head to favour the right eye or even switch stance. Now given that the way I spar encourages kicks from the front leg and the jab, this all ties in heavily ...


5

Adaptive Jiu Jitsu It is definitely possible to train and progress in BJJ with a spinal cord injury. Pete McGregor has the following advice when looking for a place to train: I will note that my disability is a spinal cord injury. I am a complete T-7 paraplegic so all of my jiujitsu is done without the use of my legs. [...] Before we even get to the ...


5

I started judo for that very same reason. It's a great sport to learn spatial perception of your own body. 13 years later I can see a huge improvement in coordination and balance. You'll see the results in a few months. Try it. Now I just enrolled in karate :) As Jigoro Kano is rumoured to have once said, or maybe not: It is not important to be ...


5

There's some options, though it becomes really specific to your ability. I made a youtube vid talking about the general issues of self defense with mobility issues last year. Here's some things to look at more specific to your question: Can you pivot on your weak leg? In some cases of leg weakness, people end up "locking" the leg. While this ends up ...


4

Now this is a very interesting question that I personally have experience with. As I have a large cutting scar on my left eye, I can't open my left eye. The eye works, but I can't open the eyelid. I use a left forward stance, even though I am left handed. However, I don't do boxing. But it doesn't matter. The eyesight isn't that much different when 1 eye is ...


4

Defending yourself when you are walking with crutches is going to be tricky and martial arts are not your ideal solution for this. Please check no nonsense self defense as it contains plenty of good advice to help keep you safe. In a nutshell, you want to concentrate on prevention, not reaction. Staying in shape when you have cerebral palsy is not trivial ...


4

It isn't the style that's going to help you - it's the instructor. Be sure to find an instructor who knows how to teach someone like you the skills you need. This will be a tall order for you; few instructors have the skills or experience to teach students with disabilities and impairments so it may take a lot of time to find one. Start with your doctor ...


4

Going slow is one of the best recommendations I could give you. While many techniques are done "in an instant" it's important to slow them down to a snail's pace once in a while & figure out all of the body mechanics (of yourself when executing a technique and your opponent as you apply a technique). That & practice physical literacy, & ...


3

Usual caveat: check in with your physician, physical therapist, etc. on what is or isn't ok for your condition. When you are looking to develop self defense skills while suffering long term/permanent impairment, you will need to focus on training that is practical and effective and doesn't necessarily rely on you having full mobility or strength. ...


3

I trained with disabled people: missing arms; wheel chair bound ME; and blind. Any good instructor will modify what they teach to suit your condition. With that in mind, go find a good school (not style), and try a few sessions. Do not limit yourself to BJJ; look at all the martial arts clubs close to you, regardless of style, since a good instructor is ...


3

I don't think we can tell you whether or not you're able to do a BJJ class. I think that's something you're going to have to try and see for yourself. If I were you, I'd call up a BJJ school I like, and I'd ask to talk with the head instructor. On the phone, I'd explain the situation and ask if it would be possible to meet with him or one of his assistant ...


3

FWIW, I've read Bruce Lee had a significant difference in leg length too: “You probably are not aware of it,” he said, “but my left leg is almost one inch shorter than the right. That fact dictated the best stance for me – my right foot leading. Then I found because the right leg was longer, I had an advantage with certain types of kicks, since the ...


3

As a brown belt you have already got a number of years of stretching behind you - did you notice any improvement that was related to that stretching (and wasn't a result of co-ordination improvement)? I would suggest that due to this being a skeletal issue your muscles will already have adapted to it - while you may be able to improve your flexibility there ...


2

Asking the Internet for advice on something like this isn't the best approach, because we don't know enough about you and your limits. The best thing would be for you to find a physiotherapist, or other sports therapist, who can spend time developing a scheme to help you (and only you!). With regard to your instructor repeatedly mentioning your poor ...


2

I'll assume you're already doing a good amount of stretching for hip and thigh muscles. The next thing to work with is core muscles - tight quadratus lumborum, psoas, and serratus muscles can also impact getting your leg height. Then beyond that is strengthening your core muscles because those impact how high you can get your leg up and hold it. Beyond ...


1

The answer to your question is that you need to find a dojo/club/class where you feel comfortable. One of the reasons I do martial arts is because I'm bad at it and I'm allowed to be bad at it. If I make a mistake in my work life, people suffer. If I make a mistake in my family/interpersonal life, there are consequences. But if I make a mistake on the ...


1

Caveat: I do not know much about cerebral palsy, particularly with regards to what is possible with hard work, and what simply cannot be expected. Be realistic about self defense You have to be realistic about self-defense goals with forearm crutches; there is a huge difference in physical capability between a person with normal use of their body and ...


1

I thought people may find it interesting to see what I actually ended up doing, so here's an update: My friend was interested in BJJ and so was I and we were going to join together, but he joined when I was on holiday but I decided to go a few weeks after. I spoke to the coach who didn't think my concerns were much of an issue (of course I am aware he may ...


1

In my club there actually are a few people with arthritis. It's usually in the wrists, which makes pushups and full contact boxing very fun for them. They work around these limitations by adjusting the exercise to suit them (eg. for pushups, doing them on the elbows instead) In general, keep in mind what you train for. If you train for competitions with ...


1

You may be able to learn a lot of useful things from watching Bill "superfoot" Wallace fight. He also has some sort of problem with one of his legs, forcing him to develop his left leg and left arm to compensate.


1

Here, by means of example, are the guidelines for examination of disabled judoka entering a Dan grading in the British Judo Association (BJA): TECHNICAL EXAMINATION FOR DISABLED PLAYERS The purpose of the grading syllabus is to help coaches provide a safe, fun and stimulating learning environment where all people with special needs feel confident and ...


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