Hot answers tagged

23

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


22

Here is a list of warning signs Note that there exists valid reasons for all of those, this is why they are only warning signs. Monthly or yearly fee that one cannot get out of paying if one quits. Buying all supplies from the Dojo/Gym. No possibility to try out a lesson before signing up. People with little or no experience are promised to achieve black ...


19

Here is a list of canonical signs Large and opaque fee structure. Unqualified instructors. There is a cult mentality in the Dojo. Secret techniques that are "too dangerous for the untrained to know or see" that require special training, usually costing more money. Obtaining a higher rank costs lots of money This is the accepted answer because the canonical ...


17

First, about children's ranks vs. adult's ranks... Child black-belts are not uncommon in the world of Karate and Taekwondo. But when there are child black-belts, they are generally awarded that rank in the "children's" rankings. This rank is not generally the same as an adult black-belt. At least in most schools. In some schools, there's no distinction ...


8

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


8

Yes Of course it is appropriate. I am struggling to find a reason why not to do it if you are keen on it. It is a piece of nice calligraphy which would be enough to display as an art piece regardless of whether you abide by it or not. Besides, it is your home and you should be able to decorate it how you see it. I could not find a higher resolution ...


8

You have an annual meeting or a Christmas party. Ask people to fill in anonymous little forms with: Three things I really like about this dojo Three things I would change. They could also nominate their favourite sensei and say what he does better than the others, that kind of thing. Then you'll get lots of surprises. (I gave up karate after I got kids, ...


8

Yes, your assumption is correct. Your body sweats in an effort to cool itself, due to either an elevated outside temperature, elevated internal temperature, or both. If you switch on a fan, all you do is assist the body in maintaining a normal operating temperature. In fact, it would actually probably be more on the beneficial side, since if your core ...


6

Using google forms (or equivalent) to provide an anonymous feedback mechanism is as good as you'll get, I think. Bottom line: if people don't want to tell you, then they won't. A pattern I've observed at my club is that one of the instructors is particularly good at alienating the more experienced players: he's very negative under the guise of providing "...


6

TL;DR I'm recommending "Step Up" as a replacement phrase. The other phrases I include are contextual, and some do not have the exact intent of "Man up". I kinda got carried away with phrases that might fit in the same slot as "Man up". For clarity, I understand "Man up" to mean that the person needs to recognize that their barriers are mental and do what ...


5

Attend a class As inconvenient as it may be, your best bet is to show up and observe or participate in a class. Almost every legitimate martial arts school I've visited has allowed new students to try out at least one class for free, and all of them allow you to observe general sessions with very little hassle. We are not in the era of "secret dojo ...


4

The sensei has modified the 'official' katas of the style. She 'mixed' some parts of pinan shodan, with pinan nidan and so. That's pretty worrying. It's not uncommon for schools to have slightly different "interpretations" of the same gross movement (e.g. one to say something's a block while another says it's a strike - but the limbs are moving in roughly ...


4

How about "Fight it" or "Fight Through" something like that? It's positive and active, non gendered, and implies an opponent (their own fear etc) that can be beaten. Push Through would work too, often already used in medical settings re pain. Also an honest talk with the women in the group, they may have suggestions.


4

Yes, you are correct. Having fans (or air conditioning) will do nothing to either help or hinder. Although, it will make you more comfortable. A warm up is designed to stretch muscles and increase joint mobility. These are somewhat affected by temperatures as the hotter it is the less one needs to warm up. However, unless at an extreme range (anything ...


4

Fitness is self defence. Rule one: CARDIO is relevant even outside of a Zombie Apocalypse. By being unfit, you are lowering your survival rates. Your chances of surviving a fight are much lower. You will feel worst mentally. You will be more prone to diseases. You will get fat and gain associated health problems. Taking good care of your body will serve ...


3

I would say, in the spirit of the question, that it should be treated with appropriate respect. While I agree with Sardathrion that it is up to you how you decorate your home, the fact that you are asking suggests that you care about "proper" approach to such symbol/item. Although not Karate practitioner myself, from my own experience with this kind of ...


3

As you have pointed out, it is difficult to get straight answers out of people who are unhappy or apathetic. Start collecting data when they begin training when you have access to them. You should start with what their goals are, how long they expect these goals will take, and how often they plan to train. This will help to understand whether their goals/...


3

Gut up. I heard Alex Jones use it once.


3

I'm not aware of a suitable term that has wide acceptance yet, but there seems to be a lot of discussion on this issue at present (in a wider context than Martial Arts). Recently, on Twitter, the term "Fortify!" has been suggested for this situation.


3

This webpage lists several Yosinkan dojo's in Japan, but the link to the Osaka dojo leads to a Japanse website with no translation. However, if Google translate is any good, there are 3 places they train: Beikomu gymnasium judo field, Amagasaki Nishinagasu cho 1-4-1 Budokan Hibiki, Toyonaka Hattorinishi cho 4-13-2 DaiSusumu building 5F, Chuo-ku, Osaka ...


3

If you like the Dojo - if the schedule is convenient, teacher is good and people are nice, join the group. It is better to join a Dojo than not. Do not worry too much about the "purity" of the style. As long as whatever is being taught in the Dojo makes sense and as long as you learn and progress, practicing always beats not practicing.


3

Just looking at the negatives... 守破離 (Shuhari) is a common concept in Japanese martial arts: to obey (守/shu) , to digress (破/ha), and to leave (離/ri) any style. It might be that said sensei is in the 破 (or digress) stage of her progression. It might be hubris but that is hard to gauge on your information alone. This could explain her "bad mouthing" other ...


3

It all depends on you honestly, she might have her reasons for asking for advance. Since these days, martial arts training centers are like in every other block (at least where l live). And it's quite natural for somebody who have that much experience to mix different styles. My sensei is a 5 dan aikidoka and also have a black belt in arnis, so often time I ...


3

Why couldn't it be? The question you cite has a long list of characteristics of a McDojo, only one of which is abnormally fast progression. At that, neither "Brazilian Jiu Jitsu" nor even "Gracie Jiu Jitsu" (due to a legal suit within the family) are trademarked terms, so I could run a "BJJ" school with whatever testing requirements I want. In actuality, I'...


2

Just because somebody comes from a certain lineage does not mean he is a good teacher or has certain skills. Lineage charts are pointless as they encourage people to believe that an instructor is a good one just because of his lineage. What about the guys who don't have this fancy lineage? Are they bad teachers? Are they lesser martial artists? It doesn't ...


2

My football (American) coach used to say "Get after it." It's a bit of a Texas kind of thing (pretty sure he was from Texas), but I found it motivating. For example, he'd sometimes talk about how he was 5th string his first year in college, but he "went after it" and was starting by the end of the season. Or while out on the field, he'd get in your face, ...


2

Personally I like "bring it!" I think this phrase covers the intended nuance of the OPs question, because the "it" can encompass all of the qualities he's seeking to stimulate: courage, skill, strength, effort, fortitude, etc. It's also not particularly macho. I find a lot of the suggestions offered so far still focus on "being tough", which whether ...


2

If the rate of people leaving isn't too great, then perhaps a personal visit might help, especially for the more blatant cases where you thought that the person was a good fit but left anyway. Be sure to be non-confrontational and state very clearly that you goal is not to convince them to come back but rather to learn how you could make the dojo better. ...


2

Don't wait for people to leave. Find out if they are happy before they leave, and do what you can to ensure they are. In our school, our instructors have cultivated an atmosphere of mutual support and encouragement, to the extent that it feels like one big family. We have the ocassional informal activity, sometimes outings that are purely social and nothing ...


2

I found that you only can spot a proper dojo by seeing the amount of effort student exert. If a dojo is full of sweaty nearly exhausted students that is a good sign. Fancy prancers walking around in fancy uniforms - McDojo..


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible