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16

Yes, but... (and it's a big "but") Two things stimulate bone density: Damage Generally our biological systems are set up so that if something is damaged, cells lay down more, tougher material since clearly what we had before wasn't quite tough enough. In other tissues, this forms as scar tissue which can reduce your mobility, however bone just gives ...


8

Yes, hitting objects does make your bones more solid. Bones are primarily made up of two parts, and outer layer and an inner layer. The outer is a thin layer of compact bone (cortical bone). The inner layer is far less compact and is known as spongy or cancellous bone. The thin layer provides up to 80% of the strength of the bone despite covering a much ...


8

One important thing, at least for arm movement whips, is proper technique, namely rotating your forearm. For example, one of the first things that new students get taught is the "rising block" or "high block", protecting your head from an descending strike. Say your right hand is "chambered" at your right hip. If your movement ...


6

I'll focus my answer on why you want to do that, and if it's an effective/safe way to achieve the goals that you are truly seeking (because even if you can increase your bone density, this does not necessarily mean that you achieve the goal you want). I'll work with 3 scenarios: I want to hit my opponent harder I want to feel less pain I want to prevent ...


5

Try these footwork patterns: Stepping forward in a low bow/front stance as you push the broom, alternating legs. It will be a challenge to actually effect the sweeping while doing this. Fighting stance: step back foot together with front foot, step front foot out to fighting stance. Do right foot forward going one way, left foot forward coming back. ...


5

There are two factors to that sound. One is rapid acceleration and deceleration of the limb in question (the sound is from the gi "catching up" and landing on the stopped limb). The other is the stiffness of the fabric, which creates the distinctive rustle of the gi as you are moving through the strike. The former is basically technique. The latter ...


4

Not all nerves do the same thing! So, here's a thing: not all nerves do the same thing, and you can deaden the pain nerves without losing movement sensitivity. Movement sensitivity is primarily from proprioception, much of which the nerves that you'd be using measure the length of your muscle spindles and how fast they're being contracted/lengthened. ...


4

The primary reason why people bang up their limbs (arms, legs, elbows, knees, and head) is to be able to lessen the pain of the impact. Secondarily, by lessening the pain, the body is able to make mechanical adaptations to improve the power of the strike. First with regards to the pain lessening... While I do believe this does deaden the nervous system's ...


3

Like any activity where you want to make those kinds of improvements; Visualisation is your friend. See yourself in your mind making those sequence links and keeping low. Do this over and over to get comfortable in your mind that you will be able to do the moves you want. The other thing is flexibility and strength. Both can be worked on separately, holding ...


3

Basing this answer on a TaeKwonDo front kick With most things in life the best way to improve is to practice it. Breaking If you are looking to break with a front kick then technique is crucial. Ensure that your knee is coming up high (and then dropping slightly as the foot fires forward to make the foot travel straight). Make sure you are making ...


3

I found great benefits in using the paper and string. Cheap and easy - Hang paper on a string wedged between ceiling tiles or spotlight fittings. Small thin note cardboard I found to work best. Rope can be trickier, but still very simple to rig up. I had one in my office, stand up have a few hits (after a stressfull phonecall) , sit down calmly.. keeps you ...


3

Well it seems I might be the only one who thinks this is mostly a myth. I'm open to the possibility that bone density can be changed by beating against the bone or breaking the bone, but I'll require citations for that from scientific sources first. I wrote about this particular issue in my answer to the broader question of: Arm Toughening Without Losing ...


3

Knee instability is usually as a result of one of two things - You either have a pre-existing injury that is contributing to the instability, or you have muscle weakness that is contributing. (This is assuming no congenital defects). For the first, you may have to supplement with braces and/or corrective surgery. While you can protect the area with proper ...


3

I'd like to think that I fall in the category 'established martial artists' as a former two-time world heavyweight champion Tae Kwon Do. As I started practicing TKD I found it easy to pick up on techniques with my dominant side and it was very tempting to practice only that side or at least favor it in training. But after a few small successes in sparring I ...


2

You can't. Not effectively that is. Other answers are telling you to simulate static throws. I avoid teaching static throws, generally. Moving drills are the most effective in my experience. Timing is crucial. Reap the foot just as he is placing his weight on it. Ko Uchi Gari, Kodokan Judo, page 69 You can't do a proper Ko Uchi Gari without having the ...


2

Century Martial Arts advertises their smallest bamboo toothpick starting at 12 oz. That would be the 50" (4' 2") variety. The lightest fiberglass I could find in a non-exhaustive search was still 1 lb. 5 oz. If that's too heavy, the student should train so it is not too heavy. Lifting weights with proper form and properly trained supervision can be a safe ...


2

The thing is, until you have gained some understanding, you really cannot tell which is wrong. This is why in some dojos the etiquette dictate that noone under 1st dan is allowed to give explanations (which just follows the principle that in any japanese art, not only the martial ones, 1st dan means you're able to teach below your rank). One sempai recently ...


2

This answer is mostly just in support of the others... Muscle strength is the best way to overcome a relatively minor knee problem and avoid future injuries. I partially tore my ACL about 10 years ago and had constant knee pain until I started spending 3 to 4 hours a week practicing Tang Soo Do. Four specific exercises that greatly strengthen legs and ...


2

Taekwondo, especially, seems to be a great destroyer of knees. Pretty much everyone I know at high levels in the art has experienced knee injury at some point. I think this is because of the right angles the stances and footwork place your feet at. Because of the way that TKD movements are structured, placing weight on the heel of the foot during a pivot ...


2

Practicing striking a rope or sheet differs from striking a bag primarily in the area of resistance. The rope or sheet will give you feedback as to whether you hit it, but will not impede your strike. Some of the advantages are: No penalty for missed or badly executed strikes - This is primarily useful in my opinion for practicing kicks, where you're more ...


2

Yes it could benefit you a lot in many different ways, as an: athlete or boxer and even your physical fitness will increase. This method allows you to aim the target much more and if you didn't hit the rope, your stamina will increase as your strength goes depleted. And as time goes by, you are more aimed than any of the boxer because the target you were ...


2

Practice your kicks as if you are moving in slow-motion. While doing so, focus on perfecting your form. Proper posture, balance, and skeletal alignment are key to optimizing your technique. Speed and power will follow. I cannot stress this enough, but practice your kicks and footwork at the same time. If you are looking to be a high level competitor in ...


2

No. The only discipline a martial art requires is the will to learn. That is it. Nothing more, nothing less. Any school that trains you to obey rules or a code of behaviour, using punishment to correct disobedience should be avoided at all costs1. As to will-power enhancing techniques/drills, those are either mythical mumbo-jumbo that you are welcome to ...


2

Bryan Garrett proposed doing Benguela games. This might actually something you want to do. As Benguela was designed to help students of Capoeira Contemporânea to develop a low game that then can lead to the game played with toce de angola. ( https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benguela_(capoeira) ). Sequences always change and depend mostly on your teacher (and ...


1

I know you said you're training Angola,.. but have you considered trying CDO Miudinho sequences? From my experience, its a great way to rep ground movements.


1

There's nothing about the question that's really specific to martial arts, so you can easily search online for tips on overcoming procrastination, and getting motivated. For example: make a regular time for exercising, so it becomes a habit: if you're working out fairly intensely then your body will come to expect and want the exercise build a routine ...


1

If you are concerned about your ability to see a martial arts class through, and you don't want to end up wasting time and money, there are things you can do to prepare yourself. First, pick a regular workout time, preferably in the same time-frame as the classes for the martial art you want to train in. Create a personal workout routine which last about an ...


1

While I agree with Sardathrion that there is no "will exercise" out there, there is something that you can do, and that's to set up a training routine and start it. Since you don't actually have martial arts training yet, and training on your own can result in bad habits, I would advise picking general stretching, calisthenics (general advice these days is ...


1

Meta: Definitive hand conditioning answer? According to the following study, practice of karate-style conditioning does lead to increased size of the metacarpals and hypertrophy of the skin over the knuckles, but it is also heavily associated with decreased wrist mobility and blood flow: Kicking and Striking Objects ... Roback5 studied 16 male ...


1

Funnily enough, I was just reading about this on BadMartialArts.com due to a different page's crosslink. They give a fairly comprehensive explanation of what's involved on a physiological level in conditioning. One of the major takeaways is that part of the conditioning is building up the muscles and learning to tense them properly against a blow to absorb ...


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