13

This is a nothing lock - it is a made for television move. While Sherlock's thumb and index finger do lie along anterior wrist points used frequently with various wrist locks or throws (e.g. kotogaeshi in Aikido), this particular implementation is a waste of bandwidth and screen frames, it is a British version of Hollywood nonsense. Try it, and see how ...


13

It's hard to tell, but it looks like the dude on the right's left arm is pushed up behind his back. I hear that called that a "chicken wing", which is similar to BJJ's "Kimura", catch-wrestling's double wrist lock, and judo's ude garami. I'm sure there's a name for it in SAMBO, and aikido too. I say "similar to" because most of those techniques actually ...


8

I'm not entirely sure this question is serious, but what the heck. :) I've known female classmates in styles like Taekwondo and Kung-fu. They generally said that getting punched in the breast was annoying, because it's a sensitive part of the body. They did not quit because of it. Many men, when sparring with women, will deliberately avoid punching or ...


8

This appears to be a hammerlock or "chicken wing", held with only one hand for ostensibly artistic purposes i.e. to imply Sherlock is so skilled he only needs to utilise a very small amount of movement/control to subdue an opponent. In reality, such a hold is relatively insecure since Sherlock is not controlling Mycroft's arm/body in any way (other ...


7

No. Not specifically. In the John Wick 2 training featurettes, they mention Japanese Juijitsu, Brazilian Juijitsu, and Judo as the three arts they practiced with Keanu in preparation for John Wick 2. Systema is not specifically called out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqG-F2t0p14&feature=youtu.be&t=53 We just went to town training him on 14 ...


7

It's basically for dramatic effect. In any fight be it competition or self defence or anything else you never stand still. This is to showing to the audience that they can block without moving and so must be much better at fighting than whoever they are facing... which is the point of most of these action films. Sometimes it also drives the plot as in ...


6

To answer your question as stated; While, it is possible to carry a knife in your teeth without injury there is no method by which you can do it safely. The teeth are formed in such a way that they are remarkably strong and resilient to damage (reference). However they are also fairly fragile due to the brittle nature of glass-like dentin. Especially ...


5

I don't know about the movies, the reason has more to do with the plot than an actual answer. In the real world, people exhibit one or more of six responses to an attack: fight, flight, freeze, negotiate, capitulate, and contemplate. In your question, those who "just stand there" are either contemplating their move, which isn't an unreasonable response if ...


5

would they actually be able to fight? What is going to stop them? Among other things, fighters can be male, female, young, old, short, fat, skinny, tall, missing limbs, or blind. You cannot tell who can fight just by looking at someone's body. Wouldn't back pain and balance be a problem? Two things: Back pain and balance are problems in the same way ...


4

Sadly, this happens in most martial arts schools in real life, too. The instructor typically has his partner do something to him, and his partner will just stop immediately afterward. Then the instructor does a bunch of other things to him in rapid succession. The purpose is obvious. It's to make the instructor look like a martial arts god. The same thing ...


4

In the Takagi-ryū of classical jūjutsu this could be considered a variation of "Ōgyaku dori". Some variants include having the arm collapsed behind the back like in the presented image and GIF. While other versions keep the arm streight or only slightly bent in order to initiate an elbow lock or even a throw. Pretty much every tradition or practice will ...


3

That it could happen is plausible as seen by the existence of real-life examples of one person defeating a mob. In general, this becomes less common without armor or weapons because all it takes is one lucky hit to create enough of an opening for others to swarm and pigpile you. Oh Dae-su has the benefit of a weapon. Weapons draw attention and make each ...


3

I have seen references to the 1982 film, The Challenge, prominently showing Aikido (Seagal was a fight coordinator). The Challenge is a 1982 American action film directed by John Frankenheimer and co-written by John Sayles. The film stars Scott Glenn and Toshirō Mifune. It is noted that this film features several aikido-based action scenes choreographed ...


2

By searching for "Aikido film" on Google I found this one from 1975: The Defensive Power of Aikido not sure if this meets your requirements though, since it's about the actual founder, Morihei Ueshiba.


2

Without knowing the exact situations you're citing, one possibility is that someone is doing a "rope-a-dope", using a strong defense and letting their opponent wear themselves out before starting their counter-attack. Fighting is hard, and someone constantly on the attack can wear out quickly. If you're in a situation where you can minimize damage (the ...


2

In addition to the well informed comments above I can add that I definitely recognised a number of throws transitioning into locks from Judo, some very elegant, as always, wrist lock throws from Aikido along with a good variety of ground work from both Brazilian and Japanese Jujitsu and more Judo. Some of the punches, elbows and open handed striking looked ...


2

To be fair, you would have to catalog every technique from every movie (3, I think) and assign them to a "style" (but what's the point?). My immediate response, though, is that Lee's predominant techniques came from Wing Chun (trapping, straight blast) and boxing (obviously NOT Wing Chun, refer to Muhammad Ali). His kicking is harder to place, ...


2

Those elbows wouldn't have done anything much at all, even to an untrained person. Most of the time the camera was too high to show her actual elbow, but she seemed too close to hit with the actual point of her elbow anyway, which is the only way the elbow would have even been painful. If it's just the back of her tricep making contact it's very unfocused ...


2

Not unrealistic at all, imho, in that Philip is highly trained fighter. The bite Paige delivers is not determinative. Only pain is inflicted. There is no serious risk of loss of function of limb, nor of death. Sometimes you have to take a hit to prevail, or other types of damage to prevail In a knife fight, I'd trade a wicked gash to my forearm in ...


1

I've watched this scene a few more times, and it's very good choreography, representative of the better work over the past few decades. Notice how relaxed Philip is during the grappling—Royce Gracie had a similar looseness, usually used to supreme effect. My guess is they brought in a stunt coordinator or choreographer or consultant with some military ...


1

If you've watched some, for example, MMA fights, you may notice that fighters are generally tolerant to pain and injures got in process. And yes, it's really so - just because high adrenaline levels do suppress pain. Level of suppression depends on genetics and hoard of other things. But what you've described is a "sudden bite". No previous ...


1

Here's the thing about real sword fights, Spinning and acrobatic tricks are largely useless because they waste energy. At 13:09 Dooku was using a divert blade maneuver then spin, to place a blade tip thrust. taking ones eyes off an opponent During a clash is very likely to leave the spinning fighter dead with a blade through their back.. Granted the addition ...


1

I think there are bunch of ways to handle this kind of 'problem'. I know some girls use elastic band to make their trainings comfortable


1

I disbelieved this attack when I first saw it. Is it realistic for an unarmed man to punch someone with a machete who was standing in their way, in the context of the screenshot? Holding, as opposed to using, a machete provides no protection to punches. There is no difference between punching the man with the machete who is standing and doing nothing from ...


1

It's a fake lock but meant to imply use of pressure points by Sherlock's thumb and first knuckle Likely Aikido inspired, as there are legends of masters being able to submit foes by placing pressure on a single point, for instance with the big toe. Choreography, not real joint locking, but meant to convey a martial ideal.


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