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Not unrealistic at all, imho, in that Philip is highly trained fighter. The bite Paige delivers is not determinative. Only pain is inflicted. There is no serious risk of loss of function of limb, nor of death. Sometimes you have to take a hit to prevail, or other types of damage to prevail In a knife fight, I'd trade a wicked gash to my forearm in ...


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I've watched this scene a few more times, and it's very good choreography, representative of the better work over the past few decades. Notice how relaxed Philip is during the grappling—Royce Gracie had a similar looseness, usually used to supreme effect. My guess is they brought in a stunt coordinator or choreographer or consultant with some military ...


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If you've watched some, for example, MMA fights, you may notice that fighters are generally tolerant to pain and injures got in process. And yes, it's really so - just because high adrenaline levels do suppress pain. Level of suppression depends on genetics and hoard of other things. But what you've described is a "sudden bite". No previous ...


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Those elbows wouldn't have done anything much at all, even to an untrained person. Most of the time the camera was too high to show her actual elbow, but she seemed too close to hit with the actual point of her elbow anyway, which is the only way the elbow would have even been painful. If it's just the back of her tricep making contact it's very unfocused ...


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Here's the thing about real sword fights, Spinning and acrobatic tricks are largely useless because they waste energy. At 13:09 Dooku was using a divert blade maneuver then spin, to place a blade tip thrust. taking ones eyes off an opponent During a clash is very likely to leave the spinning fighter dead with a blade through their back.. Granted the addition ...


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I think there are bunch of ways to handle this kind of 'problem'. I know some girls use elastic band to make their trainings comfortable


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It's a fake lock but meant to imply use of pressure points by Sherlock's thumb and first knuckle Likely Aikido inspired, as there are legends of masters being able to submit foes by placing pressure on a single point, for instance with the big toe. Choreography, not real joint locking, but meant to convey a martial ideal.


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