19

There is no scientific evidence that sex (or no sex) before competition affects performance whatsoever. BBC, again the BBC, CNN, and a general search. Therefore, "semen retention" is nothing more than mythical mumbo jumbo which is safe to utterly ignore.


14

Chen style Taiji comes first, historically speaking. From that came at least two variations of Yang style. Wu style derived from Yang style. Wu (Hao) derived from Yang and Chen style. You can find more details of the actual lineages on the web. Personally, if you're just interested in the "health" aspects of Taiji, then any of them will do just fine. All ...


13

Yes! Martial arts can help you with posture, improve you overall fitness and stamina, and give you the discipline to do things correctly. No! There are much better ways to get a good posture and behaviour while working at a desk than joining a martial art class. You can see a physiotherapist, get a new chair, have a work station safety analysis done, take ...


10

Warm up with slow, high-precision, well-known moves You should warm up thoroughly, ending with light, smooth, slow movements that you've already mastered. From Tom Kurz' article, A Well-Run Workout: The Warm-Up: Warm-up regulates emotional states because the flow of impulses from working muscles (respective motor and sensory nerve centers, actually) ...


10

This sort of product will fail to achieve any short term or long term benefits over regular training. In fact, some results show that it can hinder performance. People believe these sorts of products can increase their red blood cell count by reducing oxygen levels, similar to the way training at altitude can increase red blood cell count. The problem is ...


9

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


8

Yes, your assumption is correct. Your body sweats in an effort to cool itself, due to either an elevated outside temperature, elevated internal temperature, or both. If you switch on a fan, all you do is assist the body in maintaining a normal operating temperature. In fact, it would actually probably be more on the beneficial side, since if your core ...


7

What Is Hojo Undō? The term Hojo undō is generally translated as "supplementary exercises". Now, I can't read or speak Japanese, but the ever-useful Saiga-JP Kanji Dictionary translates the the following kanji in the phrase as: 補 fill up / supplement / compensate for / assistant 助 help / assist / aid / support / save / rescue / relieve / be helpful / ...


7

Excellent Question, @Jeroen. I have had the same problem for a long time. I am not a Wing Chun practitioner, but this has haunted me all my life throughout my Martial Arts study on all stand-up Martial Arts styles, but specially Aikido and BJJ. The interesting thing is that it was via Aikido and BJJ (and by that I mean, non-striking Martial Art) that I found ...


7

Practice when you are exhausted. When you are just too tired to have tension, you will have none. After a while, your body will remember how to do it without tension, since that is how you trained it. Note that this will not help you learn the movement and might in fact be counter-productive to learning. However, once you know the move, it might be a good ...


7

There are many weird claims and customs in traditional martial arts. I've never heard about this one, but for example in aikido we have people talking about "centering their ki" which is like an invisible force that you can use to anchor yourself to the ground so your partner won't be able to move you no matter how hard he pushes. Since you plan to practice ...


6

Looks like a modified blend of a mu ren zhuang, also known as a wooden training dummy. Different martial arts styles use them in different ways. The central padding aspect seems like it turns it into a punching bag of sorts. Not sure how many people train in tight leather at night with shades on.


6

First things first, I think you should see a doctor that could give you a "go". A specialist could tell you if he thinks it would be safe for your knee if you restarted doing martial arts. If the doctor says no, you're putting yourself at risk if you restart. Let's face it, even if you feel your health is deteriorating, it is much better than with a ...


6

Cycling will initially improve your general fitness, (especially stamina, general cardiovascular). After a while you will reach a general plateau of improved fitness (unless you keep increasing the cycling distance/intensity). The issues for martial arts fitness is that cycling only uses certain groups of movements for a repetitive action. So while you may ...


5

You seem already more than fit enough. Everyone will have their own weaknesses, be it strength, stamina, balance, flexibility, or whathaveyou. All the boxing or kickboxing programs I've seen have warmup and conditioning parts to their classes/sessions. They involve rope jumping, calisthenics, shadow boxing, bag hitting, stretching, etc. Doing those, over ...


5

Try these footwork patterns: Stepping forward in a low bow/front stance as you push the broom, alternating legs. It will be a challenge to actually effect the sweeping while doing this. Fighting stance: step back foot together with front foot, step front foot out to fighting stance. Do right foot forward going one way, left foot forward coming back. ...


5

Don't. Train your skills in class normally, without the mask. Train your conditioning outside of class, by running and sprinting or whatever. Train your strength in the gym by progressively lifting heavier weights using compound movements. The mask is an unproven fad that, even if it does work, would seem to have an effect that is better achieved through ...


5

Kicking is more than just strength. There's speed also. Combining both gives you power. But since you asked just about the strength aspect, that's what I'll respond to. With barbells or dumbbells: Deadlift, Squat, Bulgarian Split Squats, Lunges, Step-Ups. That works the entire muscle stack. Of those, the Split Squats are probably your best bet. Without ...


5

I suggest investigating interval training, which would be your option 2. Fighting requires high intensity and may not actually last that long; a low intensity jog will not put your body under the same strain. Vox has a recent update to an article explaining some of the science relating to particular workout routines and VO2 max measurements. It's also not ...


5

...while with the [interval training] I run out of break quickly and find it hard to continue the jog. Which one would give me that bit of stamina that I need to keep going in a fight? As you've seen - interval training is more tiring, and will help more. But, as Sean says neither will contribute very directly to MT performance. I train MT now but earlier ...


4

Yes! I have a very strong opinion on this because of my accidental discovery. I was a very sedentary techno-geek and starting to get a lot of back pain, which I babied in fear of worsening. Then my daughter got promoted to the adult class in Karate, because she was too tall. I joined, because I prefer to do things together, and I would otherwise be sitting ...


4

Physical activity > Physical inactivity Martial arts can help with combating the ill effects of sedentarism, but martial arts aren't very special in that regard. Some instruction on proper posture is common, but exercises or practices to maximize it are not common. I'd recommend martial arts because it's a fun way to stay active while learning a skill, but ...


4

I've been practising both Wong Shun Leung and Mai Gei Wong Wing Chun, and I had the same problems as you in the beginning. In both of these styles, early training was focused on getting the bare basics right. For example, we'd do a drill where we'd apply pressure to our partner's technique (say wu sau for example), just to train being relaxed in that ...


4

This is also a question people struggle with when wanting to return to training after a break, where it can be a bigger problem because going back in at their old level means a certain intensity from their peers. Regardless of whether taking up something new or returning to an old activity, the bottom line is participation and determination. However tough ...


4

On the physical side: Knee ligament replacement surgeries are pretty good these days. You should see a doctor to see if that is an option. (You might want it anyway, even if you don't train hard, because you want to make sure you're not suffering meniscus wear as well...). The second person you want to see is a sports medicine specialist. They can let ...


4

Yes! The trick is to actually make the non telegraphed attack into a telegraphed one. How? You practice maintaining a one-step distance. This is the distance at which your attacker must make a single step before striking you (with kick or punch). This way however good they are at not telegraphing they have no choice: The telegraph is now a single step ...


4

Yes, you are correct. Having fans (or air conditioning) will do nothing to either help or hinder. Although, it will make you more comfortable. A warm up is designed to stretch muscles and increase joint mobility. These are somewhat affected by temperatures as the hotter it is the less one needs to warm up. However, unless at an extreme range (anything ...


4

I've found that the same exercises that basketball players use to improve their jump shots are very effective. Explosive power You tend to want explosive power. Most of what we do is kick fast (not just repetitions, but a single kick itself needs to be fast). We need to build fast twitch muscles, that aids in fast contracting of the muscles needed for ...


4

Beside increasing your stamina, one important thing is learning to pace yourself in a fight, so you can keep your energy while driving your opponent into losing his, in 1st and 2nd round, so you will be able to finishing the job in the last rounds. (it will depend on how many rounds and how many minutes you are fighting for) Eventually your exhausted ...


3

I had the same problem. I did the following to strengthen my wrist. I still do end up bending my wrist occasionally but mostly the problem has gone. 1) Take a tennis ball (or any other not too hard one) and squeeze it. This will help develop the grip strength and help hold the wrist in alignment when punching. You could also do it with one of those grip ...


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