19

There is no scientific evidence that sex (or no sex) before competition affects performance whatsoever. BBC, again the BBC, CNN, and a general search. Therefore, "semen retention" is nothing more than mythical mumbo jumbo which is safe to utterly ignore.


14

Chen style Taiji comes first, historically speaking. From that came at least two variations of Yang style. Wu style derived from Yang style. Wu (Hao) derived from Yang and Chen style. You can find more details of the actual lineages on the web. Personally, if you're just interested in the "health" aspects of Taiji, then any of them will do just fine. All ...


13

Yes! Martial arts can help you with posture, improve you overall fitness and stamina, and give you the discipline to do things correctly. No! There are much better ways to get a good posture and behaviour while working at a desk than joining a martial art class. You can see a physiotherapist, get a new chair, have a work station safety analysis done, take ...


10

This sort of product will fail to achieve any short term or long term benefits over regular training. In fact, some results show that it can hinder performance. People believe these sorts of products can increase their red blood cell count by reducing oxygen levels, similar to the way training at altitude can increase red blood cell count. The problem is ...


9

Warm up with slow, high-precision, well-known moves You should warm up thoroughly, ending with light, smooth, slow movements that you've already mastered. From Tom Kurz' article, A Well-Run Workout: The Warm-Up: Warm-up regulates emotional states because the flow of impulses from working muscles (respective motor and sensory nerve centers, actually) ...


9

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


8

As my sensei says, "there is the right amount of power and speed in the technique". Basically, what he is saying is that if you do it right, the speed will come on its own. Foundation That said, there is a difference between speed, strength, and power. It's one thing to say you can put 400lbs on your back and squat with it. That speaks to strength. It'...


8

Disclaimer: I am a beginner in both judo and physical culture. My views on strength, conditioning, and technique should be viewed with skepticism. You're right that training once a week is insufficient. Most people won't see much progress in either physical condition or skills at less than two days a week minimum. I'll address solutions in the context of ...


8

Yes, your assumption is correct. Your body sweats in an effort to cool itself, due to either an elevated outside temperature, elevated internal temperature, or both. If you switch on a fan, all you do is assist the body in maintaining a normal operating temperature. In fact, it would actually probably be more on the beneficial side, since if your core ...


7

Fitness for martial arts doesn't mean just strength or aerobic capacity. It also requires flexibility and agility. Please don't ignore stretching--both in order to be better, and also to train safer. Injuries often inhibit, even preclude, eager training. (Said by the guy who's not trained seriously for a month while nursing a shoulder injury.) When I moved ...


7

Practice when you are exhausted. When you are just too tired to have tension, you will have none. After a while, your body will remember how to do it without tension, since that is how you trained it. Note that this will not help you learn the movement and might in fact be counter-productive to learning. However, once you know the move, it might be a good ...


7

Excellent Question, @Jeroen. I have had the same problem for a long time. I am not a Wing Chun practitioner, but this has haunted me all my life throughout my Martial Arts study on all stand-up Martial Arts styles, but specially Aikido and BJJ. The interesting thing is that it was via Aikido and BJJ (and by that I mean, non-striking Martial Art) that I found ...


7

There are many weird claims and customs in traditional martial arts. I've never heard about this one, but for example in aikido we have people talking about "centering their ki" which is like an invisible force that you can use to anchor yourself to the ground so your partner won't be able to move you no matter how hard he pushes. Since you plan to practice ...


6

Stairs work really well. Power up and down, take them multiple steps at a time, go sideways, backwards, everything. Put as much vertical power into your step as possible. Second thing to try is working in front of a mirror or with a videocamera. This way you can watch your form and see where your sticking points are and where you're making unnecessary ...


6

What Is Hojo Undō? The term Hojo undō is generally translated as "supplementary exercises". Now, I can't read or speak Japanese, but the ever-useful Saiga-JP Kanji Dictionary translates the the following kanji in the phrase as: 補 fill up / supplement / compensate for / assistant 助 help / assist / aid / support / save / rescue / relieve / be helpful / ...


6

Looks like a modified blend of a mu ren zhuang, also known as a wooden training dummy. Different martial arts styles use them in different ways. The central padding aspect seems like it turns it into a punching bag of sorts. Not sure how many people train in tight leather at night with shades on.


6

First things first, I think you should see a doctor that could give you a "go". A specialist could tell you if he thinks it would be safe for your knee if you restarted doing martial arts. If the doctor says no, you're putting yourself at risk if you restart. Let's face it, even if you feel your health is deteriorating, it is much better than with a ...


6

Cycling will initially improve your general fitness, (especially stamina, general cardiovascular). After a while you will reach a general plateau of improved fitness (unless you keep increasing the cycling distance/intensity). The issues for martial arts fitness is that cycling only uses certain groups of movements for a repetitive action. So while you may ...


5

Strength and Form, Not Wrist-Specific Strength Your best bet is improving your overall strength, not your wrist strength specifically. This, along with practicing good form with your punch against resistance, will keep you from bending your wrist. As Mark Rippetoe points out, it is more productive to get you strong, rather than get your wrist strong: ...


5

You seem already more than fit enough. Everyone will have their own weaknesses, be it strength, stamina, balance, flexibility, or whathaveyou. All the boxing or kickboxing programs I've seen have warmup and conditioning parts to their classes/sessions. They involve rope jumping, calisthenics, shadow boxing, bag hitting, stretching, etc. Doing those, over ...


5

Don't. Train your skills in class normally, without the mask. Train your conditioning outside of class, by running and sprinting or whatever. Train your strength in the gym by progressively lifting heavier weights using compound movements. The mask is an unproven fad that, even if it does work, would seem to have an effect that is better achieved through ...


5

Kicking is more than just strength. There's speed also. Combining both gives you power. But since you asked just about the strength aspect, that's what I'll respond to. With barbells or dumbbells: Deadlift, Squat, Bulgarian Split Squats, Lunges, Step-Ups. That works the entire muscle stack. Of those, the Split Squats are probably your best bet. Without ...


5

I suggest investigating interval training, which would be your option 2. Fighting requires high intensity and may not actually last that long; a low intensity jog will not put your body under the same strain. Vox has a recent update to an article explaining some of the science relating to particular workout routines and VO2 max measurements. It's also not ...


5

...while with the [interval training] I run out of break quickly and find it hard to continue the jog. Which one would give me that bit of stamina that I need to keep going in a fight? As you've seen - interval training is more tiring, and will help more. But, as Sean says neither will contribute very directly to MT performance. I train MT now but ...


4

I found that push-up with fist (rather than palm) helps me a lot in fixing my wrist and getting my punch in correct forms. A punch should hit target with the knuckles of the index finger and middle finger. (straight punch in taekwondo and karate) While doing push-up, You should roll your fist forward so that only these 2 knuckles (and the first part of ...


4

Push-ups are not the concern here. Instead, you are looking at a deficit of one or more of the following: strength, power, conditioning, strength-endurance, and technique. First, let's define those terms. Strength is the ability of the body to produce force. Power is the ability of the body to produce a given force quickly, and is a derivative of strength. ...


4

I'm going to go ahead and sidestep the pushups part specifically and answer the question about strength training for punching power instead. If you check out http://punchingpower.org/the-falling-step/ and go through all the videos, you'll come across a hook punch one that involves doing a swinging motion with medicine balls. That's a very specific ...


4

Physical activity > Physical inactivity Martial arts can help with combating the ill effects of sedentarism, but martial arts aren't very special in that regard. Some instruction on proper posture is common, but exercises or practices to maximize it are not common. I'd recommend martial arts because it's a fun way to stay active while learning a skill, but ...


4

Yes! I have a very strong opinion on this because of my accidental discovery. I was a very sedentary techno-geek and starting to get a lot of back pain, which I babied in fear of worsening. Then my daughter got promoted to the adult class in Karate, because she was too tall. I joined, because I prefer to do things together, and I would otherwise be sitting ...


4

I've been practising both Wong Shun Leung and Mai Gei Wong Wing Chun, and I had the same problems as you in the beginning. In both of these styles, early training was focused on getting the bare basics right. For example, we'd do a drill where we'd apply pressure to our partner's technique (say wu sau for example), just to train being relaxed in that ...


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