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12

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


11

Practicing on a mat is not sufficient. If you do not progress to harder materials you will not have the feedback benefit harder surfaces provide. You might think you're doing well because it's (relatively) comfortable. The phrase "safely fall" is nebulous. Will practicing breakfalls on forgiving surfaces transfer to concrete? Of course--you're learning how ...


10

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


9

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


9

Yes, doing proper breakfalls in judo competition means you increase the likelihood that your opponent will score and achieve higher scores for a given throw. Non-ukemi ukemi Noted judo coach Gerald Lafon has made a lot of noise about how this presents the competitive judoka with contradictory goals: Certainly, the most costly exercise in Judo in terms of ...


9

This probably should go without saying, but you will learn to do what you train to do. If you only train your ukemi as "If they use technique A, use breakfall B", you're probably not going to think of it when you trip instead. To some degree, randori or just training a variety of techniques will teach you how to fall properly spontaneously because you're ...


9

No, falling on concrete is not necessary, provided you train with mats as a safety mechanism and you do not rely on mats to protect you from unrealistic techniques. Use mats for extra safety for techniques that work without mats Mats provide an extra margin of error while you are learning but should not be used to protect you from bad technique. When you ...


8

Teaching children in Judo for 13 years now and having made an instructor's license, I will try to pin it down to some principles (as concrete lessons may be established, but are dependent on the group). General principles (all techniques/ages) These principles do not only apply to children (or ukemi), but are more essential to be held in mind and used in ...


8

I've learned both methods in judo, BJJ, and karate. Tucking the bottom leg makes for smoother rolls and stand-ups after the fall, but makes little sense if one cannot roll and is just trying to best take the impact. It is also suboptimal for rolling if one's opponent is still latched on. Keeping the bottom leg mostly straight is good for stopping the ...


7

Yes, I believe this is called, "zempo ukemi". Note that this is not "zempo kaiten ukemi". The "kaiten" part means rolling, and without rolling, you simply have "zempo ukemi". I didn't find much on the subject on the web. There is this page which you can send to Google Translate: http://escuelakuroobi.wordpress.com/2012/02/09/155/ It describes the Zempo ...


6

I suspect that you're facing one of two problems. Going into the roll straight When thinking of diving, the natural impulse is to dive straight forward, both arms outstretched, and execute a forward roll. This, naturally, draws you to roll across your spine, as it's the (literally) straightforward movement. To ensure rolling diagonally, you need to either ...


6

Although @SteveWeigand 's answer is good, I want to base another one on sources I found and introduce a new aspect: In Aikido: A Complete Guide, a generally well sourced book, there are mentioned the two names which obviously would make sense to a Japanese native speaker: zenpō ukemi: 'zenpō' or 'zenpou' literally meaning 'forward' or 'frontward'. mae ...


6

The two alternatives to posting with your arms are to execute the appropriate break-fall (as in orthodox judo/jujutsu ukemi) or to execute the appropriate turnout (as in modern unorthodox competitive ukemi). For instance, one of the most common arm-snapping posts comes from being thrown forward and over the thrower's shoulders, such as in a seoinage (...


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively risk-...


5

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


5

I have a very traditional view on this issue: it's best to take your falls with good ukemi, even in shiai. By all means, try to prevent being thrown, or turn to your stomach and fall with good front ukemi. But using poor falling technique in competition to avoid scores by your opponent is a path to injury, not long-term success. Competitors are better off ...


5

For a judo perspective on falling technique (ukemi), the best place to start is the formal throwing techniques (nage-no-kata), where the most emphasis is placed on falling details. For forward rolling falls (zempo kaiten), there are two basic possibilities: You cannot roll and stand up, as in the nage-no-kata fall for tsurikomi goshi. You may be ...


5

In my old Aikido club we used to have people make a circle with their arms as if they were wrapping them around an exercise ball with the palms facing away. If you want to roll over right shoulder, you'd make the circle with your right elbow pointing up and right-hand fingers pointing down. If you want to roll over your left should, you'd make a circle with ...


5

Limbo Haven't gotten really deep into ukemi, but it seems like if you made it a game like limbo, that would be pretty fun for kids. Hold a broom-stick pretty high at first, have them forward roll underneath it. Then lower it as they progress. Then start with it low and have them roll over it. Raise the bar as they progress. This could probably be done ...


5

I suppose you mean that one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YPhgdjlYCw Three aspects to bear in mind: In Judo there often is full control of the partner straight down to the ground. You will possibly not get your arm free and can roll on like you want. Not every throw or partner will allow for that to happen. That being said, it depends. A well-executed, ...


5

In my experience, doing simple Ukemi over hard surfaces provides important feedback about any problems with your technique. You will boldly notice if your head, shoulder, arm, elbow, hip, knees, or ankles are hitting the floor. There's no need to roll over concrete, though. The ground under a park's grass is hard enough, and a beach provides several ...


5

When both legs are trapped, there are two relatively safe breakfall options left: onto the side of your body, if you can twist your upper body 90 degrees, or forwards. Forward breakfall (Mae ukemi): https://youtu.be/OegVa1MjMO8 Sidewards breakfall (Yoko ukemi: https://youtu.be/gEdtaj5Mbmk If possible, I'd always prefer the sidewards option over the forwards ...


4

At my taijutsu dojo, the instructors teach basic ukemi to kids as young as seven. The way they approach it is to start by showing it in action with an advanced technique -- like, they'll do a rear sweep on a guy, then point out how that would have hurt if he didn't fall on his back properly, then teach the rear hard fall. So, just like teaching anything: ...


4

Suggest you review Patrick Parker's blog (I've linked to a post that is specific to teaching children; it references exercises & games to teach kids). Specifically he mentions How to get kids to slap when they fall and Children's falling exercises, but there is a lot there, and Parker-Shihan is probably the best aikido blogger out there.


4

In Aikido, the practice of ukemi, beyond the obvious fitness' reasons, has 2 reasons: allow the tori to perform techniques without restraint. Technically, the technique is as good as it unbalances uke. A good uke allows tori/shite to focus a bit more on the technique rather than the safety of his partner. The second reason is less obvious and more ...


4

if you ever forget to hold your chin on your chest when you fall, you'll smash your head on the ground after a fall, and you'll know why you learn ukemi. It HURTS. I've seen an olympians judoka (who have beeing intensively trained for most of his live) got to tears after failing an ukemi and hitting his head ... and when it happened, he stopped training ...


4

In Aikido, the referees will award an ippon based on a good technique from tori's part, however much noise uke makes. If, uke falls over and the technique is rubbish, then all that is awarded is a wazari. There are three judges so even if one cannot see what happens, the other two should be able to. Of course, judges are human and can err but a compliant ...


4

You need to go to the opposite hip from the shoulder you land on. This roll or break fall (ukemi) is known as Mae Chugeri. A very simple way to practice this is to take your lead arm, and make a 45 degree cutting movement down and across the front of your body; so if your left arm is forward then cut towards your right hip. Then allow your shoulder to ...


4

When doing ushiro ukemi (back breakfall), the hands should slap the mat at the same time. Sometimes the throw means that it is impractical to do so thus either one hand is enough (more a side breakfall) or one hand after the other hit the mat. The latter is "bad form" but sometimes the best you can do due to position and momentum.


4

Louder does not necessarily mean more impact A louder thud does not mean more impact (more energy in the physics sense). My first sensei explained this principle with a book analogy. If you drop a hardback book flat on its cover from chest height, it makes a loud thud. If you drop it from the same height on a corner, it does not make a loud thud, but ...


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