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11 votes

Is it necessary to practice falling on concrete to help prepare for a real life situation and build up endurance?

Practicing on a mat is not sufficient. If you do not progress to harder materials you will not have the feedback benefit harder surfaces provide. You might think you're doing well because it's (...
Dave Newton's user avatar
  • 1,365
10 votes
Accepted

Is it necessary to practice falling on concrete to help prepare for a real life situation and build up endurance?

No, falling on concrete is not necessary, provided you train with mats as a safety mechanism and you do not rely on mats to protect you from unrealistic techniques. Use mats for extra safety for ...
mattm's user avatar
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9 votes
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Apply Falling Technique in Real Situation

This probably should go without saying, but you will learn to do what you train to do. If you only train your ukemi as "If they use technique A, use breakfall B", you're probably not going to think of ...
Macaco Branco's user avatar
8 votes

Teaching ukemi to children

Teaching children in Judo for 13 years now and having made an instructor's license, I will try to pin it down to some principles (as concrete lessons may be established, but are dependent on the group)...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
6 votes

Would aikido high feather falls work in judo?

I suppose you mean that one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YPhgdjlYCw Three aspects to bear in mind: In Judo there often is full control of the partner straight down to the ground. You will ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
6 votes

Falling leaf ukemi

Although @SteveWeigand 's answer is good, I want to base another one on sources I found and introduce a new aspect: In Aikido: A Complete Guide, a generally well sourced book, there are mentioned the ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
6 votes

Alternatives to posting with your arms while grappling

The two alternatives to posting with your arms are to execute the appropriate break-fall (as in orthodox judo/jujutsu ukemi) or to execute the appropriate turnout (as in modern unorthodox competitive ...
Dave Liepmann's user avatar
5 votes
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Alternatives to posting with your arms while grappling

When both legs are trapped, there are two relatively safe breakfall options left: onto the side of your body, if you can twist your upper body 90 degrees, or forwards. Forward breakfall (Mae ukemi): ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
5 votes

Is it necessary to practice falling on concrete to help prepare for a real life situation and build up endurance?

In my experience, doing simple Ukemi over hard surfaces provides important feedback about any problems with your technique. You will boldly notice if your head, shoulder, arm, elbow, hip, knees, or ...
Apalala's user avatar
  • 207
4 votes

How can beginner adults overcome initial nausea when learning rolling falls?

The two main causes for nausea after rolls are problems with your vestibular system (balance organ in your ear) problems with your blood pressure adaptations (orthostatic nausea) The first could be ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
4 votes

Is it necessary to practice falling on concrete to help prepare for a real life situation and build up endurance?

Training on firm mats is probably sufficient for learning how to take a fall. There's a slight risk of picking up bad habits, not removing small inefficiencies in the fall (I know that I used to be ...
Macaco Branco's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Single slap versus double slaps in 2 hand ukemi

When doing ushiro ukemi (back breakfall), the hands should slap the mat at the same time. Sometimes the throw means that it is impractical to do so thus either one hand is enough (more a side ...
Sardathrion - against SE abuse's user avatar
4 votes

Would aikido high feather falls work in judo?

Louder does not necessarily mean more impact A louder thud does not mean more impact (more energy in the physics sense). My first sensei explained this principle with a book analogy. If you drop a ...
mattm's user avatar
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3 votes

Learn first the back roll or the front roll?

You should learn whichever one your instructor tells you to learn first. It makes no difference, they're both basic techniques that you'll eventually need to learn. I will say that for beginners, ...
Andrew Jay's user avatar
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3 votes
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Learn first the back roll or the front roll?

What you describe is the usual practice: Backwards first, then sidewards (both without rolling), then backwards rolling, and forwards as the last one. Hard evidence As a German Judo coach, I tried to ...
Philip Klöcking's user avatar
3 votes

What is the natural position that a person normally falls in a violent encounter?

The question asks in what position do people most often land in after falling down during a fight. Given a lack of statistics about real world fights in general, I don't think we'll have a definitive ...
Steve Weigand's user avatar
2 votes

How can beginner adults overcome initial nausea when learning rolling falls?

It's important to identify the cause of the nausea. Is it fear? Is it incorrect breathing technique? Is it fatigue (too many ukemi for a beginner)? At my Aikido Dojo an advanced student was placed in ...
Apalala's user avatar
  • 207
2 votes

Is it necessary to practice falling on concrete to help prepare for a real life situation and build up endurance?

Training on mats is great as it may allow less risk of injury. However, it may not suffice to your needs of a real situation. For example, when you fall down on a surface that is concrete, you feel a ...
ashkanaral's user avatar
2 votes

Etymology and meaning of ukemi

Here is how the relevant terms are defined in the Kodokan New Japanese-English Dictionary of Judo: uke ("receiver"; the thrown; uke) The person who receives a technique during repetition (...
brazofuerte's user avatar
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2 votes
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Exercises to train better falling when thrown

I suggest you check out the series of videos linked by judoinfo.com. The side and rear falls are the easiest to learn first. The videos go through a good progression, learning the process in reverse. ...
mattm's user avatar
  • 14.4k
2 votes

Learn first the back roll or the front roll?

What's most commonly taught first varies by martial art: in Aikido (and Hapkido for whatever that's worth / appreciate you're using Japanese terminology) training, it's very, very common to roll ...
Tony D's user avatar
  • 4,150
1 vote

Learn first the back roll or the front roll?

Adding to Phillip's commentary, my experience in Aikido and Jujitsu, as well as a handful of arts where grappling isn't primary, breakfalls are generally taught first because they have fewer moving ...
Macaco Branco's user avatar
1 vote

Apply Falling Technique in Real Situation

They most definitely are applicable in real situations. In our club, we call it investing in your old day. With that, we mean that even if you don't do martial arts, practicing proper falling ...
Raf's user avatar
  • 796
1 vote

Fall Differences between Jujitsu, Aikido, and Judo

I have to disagree with Dave. Keeping the bottom leg mostly straight is good for stopping the roll and distributing the impact, but definitely suboptimal for rolling to stand up This video shows how ...
tye649's user avatar
  • 309
1 vote

Teaching ukemi to children

In my Judo class, we do what we call "Ukemi competion": we assign every Ukemi a number and whenever the insctructor shouts that number, everybody has to excecute the fall. The last one to execute it ...
Corrado's user avatar
  • 171

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