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11

Practicing on a mat is not sufficient. If you do not progress to harder materials you will not have the feedback benefit harder surfaces provide. You might think you're doing well because it's (relatively) comfortable. The phrase "safely fall" is nebulous. Will practicing breakfalls on forgiving surfaces transfer to concrete? Of course--you're learning how ...


9

No, falling on concrete is not necessary, provided you train with mats as a safety mechanism and you do not rely on mats to protect you from unrealistic techniques. Use mats for extra safety for techniques that work without mats Mats provide an extra margin of error while you are learning but should not be used to protect you from bad technique. When you ...


6

The two alternatives to posting with your arms are to execute the appropriate break-fall (as in orthodox judo/jujutsu ukemi) or to execute the appropriate turnout (as in modern unorthodox competitive ukemi). For instance, one of the most common arm-snapping posts comes from being thrown forward and over the thrower's shoulders, such as in a seoinage (...


5

When both legs are trapped, there are two relatively safe breakfall options left: onto the side of your body, if you can twist your upper body 90 degrees, or forwards. Forward breakfall (Mae ukemi): https://youtu.be/OegVa1MjMO8 Sidewards breakfall (Yoko ukemi: https://youtu.be/gEdtaj5Mbmk If possible, I'd always prefer the sidewards option over the forwards ...


5

In my experience, doing simple Ukemi over hard surfaces provides important feedback about any problems with your technique. You will boldly notice if your head, shoulder, arm, elbow, hip, knees, or ankles are hitting the floor. There's no need to roll over concrete, though. The ground under a park's grass is hard enough, and a beach provides several ...


3

Training on firm mats is probably sufficient for learning how to take a fall. There's a slight risk of picking up bad habits, not removing small inefficiencies in the fall (I know that I used to be bad about not distributing my impact along my side in situations where I knew I could fall flat without injury, whereas on wood or concrete, the point of my hip ...


2

Training on mats is great as it may allow less risk of injury. However, it may not suffice to your needs of a real situation. For example, when you fall down on a surface that is concrete, you feel a hard impact unlike a mat that suppresses the fall because of the cushion that it has. You may even want to practice the impact of a fall that a concrete gives ...


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