8

Mainly for versatility and stability. In fencing your actions moving backwards are just as important as your actions moving forwards. A lot of people think of it as advancing on your opponent or retreating from them, but the point of those things isn't to capture or cede strip, it is to open and close distance. When you're fencing, you know your range and ...


7

Fair warning, this is largely anecdotal, but I think that dancing is useful for most martial artists. Frankly, I think it's useful for most athletes. Dancing teaches you to move in a very precise measured manner, so it definitely improves your smoothness and precision of movement. I also think dancing is good because, frankly, martial artists are often bad ...


7

It has been a while since I fenced, but my understanding of the foot position is to increase stability during a deep thrust like the one shown below. Look at the leg slightly above the "C" of the fencer on the right. Were their foot in any other position, they would not be able to extend as much.


5

Sure, learning to dance can be beneficial to martial artists. Anything where you learn to use your body better is beneficial. I had a judo instructor who thought dancing was an easy way to improve footwork. He especially encouraged those with uncoordinated feet to learn to dance. Judo, however, does not spend a lot of time on footwork. On another level, ...


5

I still remember the start of my very first fencing lesson at school. We had no swords, the instructor just paired is up and gave us a game. We had to touch each other with our right thumbs and shout whenever a touch landed. Five minutes later we were all laughing when he suddenly shouted "freeze!". We all did. "You are all standing with one arm out and one ...


5

Kicking is more than just strength. There's speed also. Combining both gives you power. But since you asked just about the strength aspect, that's what I'll respond to. With barbells or dumbbells: Deadlift, Squat, Bulgarian Split Squats, Lunges, Step-Ups. That works the entire muscle stack. Of those, the Split Squats are probably your best bet. Without ...


4

Gripping daintily with only a few fingers is a drill my judo coach utilized to de-emphasize straight-arming and other gripping strategies as a defensive tactic, so one could focus on evasive footwork and hip blocks instead. Another contributing idea is that a tense grip encourages static, in-place judo, because one tries to control the opponent (through ...


4

I've found that the same exercises that basketball players use to improve their jump shots are very effective. Explosive power You tend to want explosive power. Most of what we do is kick fast (not just repetitions, but a single kick itself needs to be fast). We need to build fast twitch muscles, that aids in fast contracting of the muscles needed for ...


4

It's hard to say without better context, but that looks like a standard Side Step drill, as seen here. Diagonal step in, kick. Repeat on the other side. The duct tape provides a tactile and visual guide for the steps. The image on the wall provides a target. You can see similar duct-tape diagrams in this boxing footwork tutorial and I know that my SCA light ...


3

As a general rule, the higher you go up on your toes (well, really, the ball of the foot unless you're doing ballet), the more you reduce stability and power, but conversely you gain a bit in height/distance and increased flexibility/mobility. If that inch makes the difference between hitting your opponent or not (particularly if they've opted to try to just ...


3

The question is pretty broad, but I think I understand what you're asking. The main thing to realize is that footwork is absolutely essential to a good defense. Why? For the complete answer, read my answer at the following link first: Defence in martial arts in general The gist of that answer is that it takes time for people to react to anything happening. ...


3

I've done ballroom dancing and many martial arts. While I did find some things that I could take from one to apply to the other, generally I concluded that they're fundamentally different. Let me explain. In ballroom dancing, a male lead needs to be able to signal to his partner what he's about to do. The signal comes from a solid frame that provides ...


3

I was a dancer first and became a martial artist later. As I have bad knees, in order to protect them from overrotation, I started off wearing 'footundies', a specialised version of the socks rolled up halfway we used to wear in dance classes to be able to spin on the ball but also to have friction when putting down the heel. I found that I pivot much more ...


3

Neither, you should be looking for something that does not restrict your move set. If your main protagonist is wearing a tight t-shirt, then as soon as he throw a big punch, there's gonna be a ripping sound as the t-shirt shears a la Hulk. If they are wearing a tight fitting pencil skirt, any kicks is going to be impeded, the skirt will tear, and their ...


2

Following up on junfanbl's answer, the key to moving smoothly like that, no matter your size, is efficiency. Doing specific footwork drills, such as agility ladders is important to give you building blocks to work from, but ultimately, the key is to become comfortable with your own body, and the only way to do that is to practice movement over and over again,...


2

Since you referenced Bruce Lee I will comment on what I know about his training on footwork; here are some things he did to improve his footwork: Jump Roping was part of his routine. Boxers also use this to help with footwork. It helps you to be lighter on your feet. Bruce would run backwards during his jogging sessions to increase his back pedaling speed, ...


2

Very thought-provoking question. I would say yes, dancing can help. But truly, some forms of dance are out of place in any martial context, and in other cases, dance's benefit is brief or superficial. Other times, it's hugely beneficial. First off, the intention of dance is not at all relevant. Dance is done to convey emotion, while in martial arts, the ...


2

Body-fitting: The only possible pro I can see is jock support. But this is achieved in a number of ways with loose shorts as well, so it may not be very valid. The other reason for wearing body-fitting clothes is aerodynamic advantage (think swimming, cycling)- not much of a concern in martial arts. Loose: The biggest pro is ventilation, which keeps body ...


2

In Shotokan karate, the stance is known as kokustu-dachi. It is a defensive stance that keeps the target area farther away from the opponent, yet easily shifts into a front stance/lunge (zenkustu-dachi) when an opponent leaves an opening. I assume it is the same with fencing. The back foot, at a right angle to the front (which is pointed at the opponent), ...


2

A way to avoid the pivoting is to use step-through or jumping techniques. Step-through is specifically taking a small step forward/backwards from opponent and putting your foot down pivoted (i.e. pivot in the air whilst stepping) then you can kick with all of the power that pivoting offers you. It also works by jumping instead of standing pivot. You can ...


2

I just bought some adjustable 10lbs ankle weights to improve the speed of my legs. Currently i can properly perform the stances, shifts, and misc. kicks and footwork with 7-8lbs on each leg. When i train with the ankle weights i also hold a 10lbs dumbbell weight in each hand, which improves me hand speed. This type of training also helps with the main issue ...


1

Tenshin is doing an ayumi ashi step forwards followed by a small tenkan, moving offline and adjusting to face uke. It is the beginning footwork that is done in the aikikai version of yokomen uchi shihonage omote.


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