Hot answers tagged

23

"Harden up", "come on", "toughen up", "get it together", "just do it", and "let's go" can all be slotted into the same purpose. One could even reach for "osu". I find the gist of the phrase comes more from elements other than word choice, such as volume, sharpness of tone, or accompanying the phrase with a loud clap.


22

Nobody cares if a man likes the idea of women-only classes. They're not for you. They're for women. With some historical perspective, poo-pooing the idea of women-only classes becomes even more ridiculous. In my lifetime, women were banned from many karate and judo dojo. To turn around so quickly and say that women must train with men, not on their own, ...


17

First, men who know nothing about martial arts may see a woman leading the class and immediately think that they (the men) could beat up the female teacher. So they think there is no reason why the woman could teach them anything about fighting. Second, some men might not want to train with women at all (students or teachers), because it would be awkward ...


12

First, let me begin with "What do you mean by effective?" In this case, there is enough context that I think I know, but it can matter a lot. Very few martial arts are truly ineffective, but all of them are products of their environments and the needs of their founders. Muay Thai is brutal, and thus probably not the best choice for someone that needs to ...


12

Just as a women that trained in both women-only and mixed-classes: Body issues - I feel more confident when I'm surrounded by women. In my gender-mixed training I always make sure I wear long pants. Strength - I can't do push ups, which is totally accepted in women-only class but less accepted in classes where there are mostly men. This is of course even ...


8

Since you are already using Japanese terms, may I suggest: 頑張れ -- ganbare! Which translates as "Do Your Best!"


8

Any art where you train vigorously and practice applying your techniques against a moving, unpredictable, uncooperative partner will develop self-defense skills and attributes. Judo, BJJ, boxing, kickboxing, SAMBO, MMA, and other arts are all reliable styles for finding that kind of training. The goal is to regularly practice sparring in class in order to ...


8

I agree the desired end-state has men and women training together, but it can be difficult to start there. People do not always voice complaints. I suspect this is because complaining is viewed as a form of weakness. In judo, which involves close-contact grappling, I have seen men (instructors even!) get inappropriately cozy with young women; they create ...


7

What you should be learning First, I'll point out factors you want in any training aimed primarily at self defense. This is because there are schools, programs, workshops, etc. that claim to be about self defense and don't cover these things, and there are schools for sports martial arts or traditional/cultural martial arts that DO, and this is really the ...


6

TL;DR I'm recommending "Step Up" as a replacement phrase. The other phrases I include are contextual, and some do not have the exact intent of "Man up". I kinda got carried away with phrases that might fit in the same slot as "Man up". For clarity, I understand "Man up" to mean that the person needs to recognize that their barriers are mental and do what ...


5

The paper Reinterpreting the history of women's judo in Japan (2011) discusses in detail the history of women's involvement in judo from its earliest years, and how its style, purpose, and training differed from that taught to men at the time. It notes: The first female judo student seems to have been Sueko Ashiya, arranged by appointment in 1893, ...


5

It's common for light-contact karate divisions to not be divided by gender. Note the diminished importance of strength due to the lack of hard contact in this ruleset. In American high-school wrestling, I hear girls often but not always compete with boys. Male/female exhibition matches between men and women have occurred in boxing and kickboxing. In youth ...


5

In the following report from the Martial Arts Studies Research Network Engaging Women and Girls in Martial Arts and Combat Sports: Theoretical Issues and their Implications for Practice (2016), the issue of female-exclusive classes is discussed. They note primarily that many women find training with men intimidating, and that providing such classes can ...


4

You're a female, and you're mostly interested in self-defense. Presumably this is because you just want to be able to defend yourself in common real-life situations women might find themselves in. And you're worried that the class you enroll in will only teach things that are useful for much taller men. Briefly, my recommendation for you is to look at ...


4

1. Seiza gender differences The prescribed gender differences in seiza one sometimes hears stem from traditional Japanese seating etiquette, analogous to sitting sidesaddle/astride in equestrianism, or with legs crossed/spread on a chair. These differences are echoed in texts on other traditional Japanese practices which involve seiza e.g. buddhism, chado, ...


4

The traditional way to sit for men is indeed with 2 fists in between. Women can choose to close their legs but should definitely not be forced to. The placing of the hands is with your hands facing each other, placed on the end of your Judogi. You put your elbows outward. When you bow you simply place your hands in front of you the same way they are placed ...


4

Just focusing on the "How a woman can teach martial art for men?" aspect more than the "understanding why men might be uncomfortable" bit which has been well-covered in existing answers. Steve Weigand also shared some good ideas how to get guys in the door and stop them walking out before they've even got an impression of you as an instructor, if you do get ...


4

How about "Fight it" or "Fight Through" something like that? It's positive and active, non gendered, and implies an opponent (their own fear etc) that can be beaten. Push Through would work too, often already used in medical settings re pain. Also an honest talk with the women in the group, they may have suggestions.


3

Gut up. I heard Alex Jones use it once.


3

I'm not aware of a suitable term that has wide acceptance yet, but there seems to be a lot of discussion on this issue at present (in a wider context than Martial Arts). Recently, on Twitter, the term "Fortify!" has been suggested for this situation.


2

There are several things to consider. What weapons are legal where you live? Which of these do you intend to carry? In some states of the USA you can carry a gun. This makes military styles such as Krav maga much more useful as they teach you to make space to draw a gun. Where I live in the UK weapons are illegal; no guns, no blades, no sticks. As a ...


2

I will suggest some martial arts that use the opponent's strength against him; martial arts that have simple and easy to learn moves (not in order of importance): Aikido Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Jeet Kune Do Krav Maga Wing Chun Wu Shu (some styles) In my case, I practice Krav Maga and I like it.


2

Unfortunately a lot of martial arts is sold on machoism. Men who build their self image on machoism don't feel they can learn "how to be a man" (as opposed to, say, their martial art), from a woman. They may not say it, they may not even be self aware enough to acknowledge that's what's driving them, but it's true for a lot of men. When you add in the ...


2

My football (American) coach used to say "Get after it." It's a bit of a Texas kind of thing (pretty sure he was from Texas), but I found it motivating. For example, he'd sometimes talk about how he was 5th string his first year in college, but he "went after it" and was starting by the end of the season. Or while out on the field, he'd get in your face, ...


2

Personally I like "bring it!" I think this phrase covers the intended nuance of the OPs question, because the "it" can encompass all of the qualities he's seeking to stimulate: courage, skill, strength, effort, fortitude, etc. It's also not particularly macho. I find a lot of the suggestions offered so far still focus on "being tough", which whether ...


2

Aikido has mixed team competition. Might be worth reviewing the World Sport Aikido Federation event list, or the event list from the 2016 Tomiki Nationals. (I was there for part of those, but the only mixed gender I recall is team). I can't find an event list for the nationals. I would be surprised if taiji push hands tournaments didn't have some mixed.


2

There are occasionally Brazilian Jiu Jitsu tournaments with mixed gender divisions. They are extremely uncommon, and are only done in smaller tournaments because there would not be enough women to fill their own divisions. A little anecdotal info: I've done two of these tournaments with mixed gender brackets. The women never did well. Even though they were ...


2

Age 3 is a little early, as children of that age do not yet have an inclination towards discipline, focus, etc. - they are still learning the basics of socialization and behavior. However, once they get to 4 or 5 years of age, you might consider Gracie Jiu-Jitsu if you have an academy nearby. They have a highly developed curriculum called Bullyproof, which ...


1

Here in the UK, competitive participation for female judoka is lower than that of male judoka - a statement which is easily supported by looking at pool sheets (Eg Here) and noting that usually the pool sizes for the female categories are lower. Now, from this fact, you can directly infer that female judoka have fewer opportunities to learn their craft at a ...


1

I have the phrase in pretty much everything I do: "Always winning - never won!" To that end whenever I motivating someone to try hard I shout "Win!" and when they complete a task I would exclaim "Winning!"... They have not won, they are simply on to the next task.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible