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13

Most Brazilian Jiujitsu schools do have children's ranks which automatically get turned into adult ranks when they turn 16. So a children's orange belt will become an adult's blue belt automatically at age 16. A children's green belt will automatically become an adult's purple belt at age 16. This is usually how it's done, but a teacher might decide to award ...


10

There is no official method since every school has different rules. However, it is quite standard to convert all the belts from the yellow up to a blue belt. This is because there is normally no sense in letting these former under-16 people fight against white belts. On the other side, if they are much better than a blue belt they will prove it quickly ...


9

Special thanks to @JohnP and @Fuzzyboots for an interesting discussion in the chat (Link to the Open Roda discussion). The answer is, for me anyway, is IF there is any doubt that your child is not receiving all he/she can from a Taekwondo school, pull them out and send them to another school. Do not get caught up in the titles, belt levels etc. Do what is ...


9

The Kukkiwon splits all the countries in the world into two categories, depending on whether that Member National Association (MNA) for the World Taekwondo Federation (WTF) in that country controls over 70% of Taekwondo groups and instructors. Those that do are considered to be in the "1st Category" and recommendations can only be made by the President of ...


9

Roosevelt's Judo experience Roosevelt trained judo under two instructors (John O'Brien, and Yoshiaki Yamashita) for a period of around a few months each in 1902 and 1904. He maintained an interest in the art after this, corresponding and reading on it, and may have continued to sporadically train with wrestling partners, but by his own autobiography's ...


9

A third degree brown belt is the lowest level of brown belt, not the highest, and is thus the furthest from black belt. A black belt does also not denote an understanding of all the tenets of judo. A third-degree brown belt means that you're not a total novice to the art. Sometimes it means even less. Teddy Roosevelt was a tough guy who liked many combat ...


8

At my kyokushin karate dojo, one of the instructors is nearly 80. He's physically incapable of performing most of the techniques he teaches. Like, one of his knees doesn't really bend anymore, so he can't even kick at all. But he still knows what a proper kick should look like. And he was an actual school teacher for ~50 years, so he's very good at ...


7

Any of your proposed actions could be appropriate, depending upon circumstances. As a student, you need to understand what you need to improve, exactly what you need to get there, and practice. It's your teacher's job to set you on the right path by showing you what you need to improve, and giving you the tools to get there. Mindless practice does not lead ...


7

Git gud 😁 To paraphrase the "train like you fight, fight like you train" mantra, you need to train in conditions worst (or better, depending on your point of view) than those in your gradings: So with pressure and fatigue both mental and physical. The best way to do this is demonstrations at the end of a class. You get up, demonstrates something from the ...


7

I talk about this in more detail in my answer here: What Brazilian Jiu Jitsu belt ranking at age 16 after 11 yrs experience? The answer is that most BJJ schools will automatically convert (without need for a test) your children's rank into an adult rank when you reach 16 years old. But as my answer in the link above suggests, the adult rank you actually ...


6

No, there is no maximum or minimum time limit. There are several organizations that claim to be the governing body of BJJ, but none of them are official. (One overbearing organization, the IBJJF, actually tries to force people to pay them for belt registration!) There are countless tournaments and pro invitationals with different rule sets (legal ...


6

The video is from the World Martial Arts Association which was setup by Michael T. Dealy in the early 1990s, Mike Dealy trained under Grandmaster Duk Sung Son. The style is Chung Do Kwan, a form of Tae Kwon Do with light or no-contact. The WMAA has a video channel on Youtube, but about a year ago all video's were removed, probably because of the criticism ...


6

If you love martial arts and are bored with your current school, it may be because it's designed in a predictable way - belts, ranks, etc. You can see where it's leading and it can make you feel boxed into a program. Some will disagree, because many people stay with their style all their lives, but you might find if you leave that school, and try another ...


6

When there are two or more opponents to fight, they will easily win if they can gang up on you and take you on all at the same time. They want to overwhelm you by striking you from all directions, making it impossible for you to defend yourself. So that's their primary strategy and what you must avoid letting them do. Your training must involve learning to ...


4

In our dojo this is what we do for the Shotokan black belt exam (1st dan): We i.e. each student, does 15 different Kihon (or combination) that have been extracted from one of the katas used in the exam. In our dojo it is customary to choose one of the upper katas of this exam to extract the kihon. Typically it is Bassai dai. Each kihon is repeated 5 times. ...


4

In my experience burn out or boredom happens to most people at some point in their training. First thing to always be encouraged is talk to your instructor, odds are they have felt the same way at some point and could offer some helpful advice. Personally I found that trying a totally new martial art in conjunction with karate is a good way for me at least ...


4

I love testing-- the prep period leading up to it is fun to me, so not sure how to motivate you there, but now I have almost 2 years before I can go again, so I understand how you feel about getting bored. These are some things I've done to keep things interesting. Our school's black belts are working on another style of forms. It was refreshing at first to ...


4

To a certain degree, yes you can prepare yourself for the godan test in Bujinkan. Although you'll hear a lot of talk within Bujinkan about supernatural abilities to sense "killer intent" (saki) telepathically, humans are incapable of telepathy. So something else is going on. What is it? Well if you can't read minds, what else do you have? The ...


4

This actually happens quite a bit. I don't have statistics on how often it happens, but there are a ton of martial arts schools headed by people who essentially started their own school and declared themselves a 10th dan grandmaster. They may have something worthwhile to teach, or not. But because of the competitive nature of martial arts schools, few of ...


4

Honestly, you can do whatever you want. Your system attaches meaning to a rank. Outside your system, this rank is meaningless. Systems commonly assign rank by dictator or committee. You could do it by drawing of lots, popular voting, or who can pass a standardized test. The dan system is a simply a parallel to the common structure of education. Just as in ...


3

We train Royce Gracie style BJJ (non-competitive, self-defense oriented, with a mix of MMA), and out of respect to him the organization heads decided to only hold promotions when he comes to the country to hold a training seminar once a year. The flip side is, if you don't go (and it is expensive and a couple hours' drive away), you don't get promoted. ...


3

If you already have your established base, love martial arts and are tired, maybe it's time to: Start teaching; Try new styles as long as you can continue to use your internalized base. Some styles will not force you to "start over" but add complementary techniques and approaches.


3

What our club does, is have senior students try new things out together. This can be a new form, or advanced techniques that can be just fun without being practical, or just generally letting them fool around with old forms (which still have to be practiced regularly, of course). Alot of these aren't for any curriculum. They're to further insights and to ...


3

I'll relate my experience testing for black belt in Taekwondo. This was ages ago when I was just 17 years old, but I think the lessons I learned apply universally. When I was a brown belt one stripe testing for brown belt with 2 or 3 stripes (in our system we had brown belt 3 stripes before black belt), I had been given a single board speed break with a ...


3

Judo also has a different system for kids. I think it's because kids lose interest if they aren't getting promotions frequently.


2

The years of experience is not the only consideration for the graduation. Also opposite that Steven said I never so a student get a different belt of the blue when this turn 16 years old. At IBJJF.org has some rules about the time between the belts. But this rules aren't very strict and very hard to make it happens. The athlete should be in the belt at ...


2

I agree with Sardathrion's answer for the most part. I have a different take though. Don't try to escape the stress. The point [partly] of a grading is to simulate "combat stress" to test how you cope under similar conditions. No matter who you are, combat is stressful. So accept it. In a stressful situation, one's conscious mind blanks out. That's why you ...


2

No, you cannot typically test an applicant alone. At a minimum, three to ten people must promote. Read on: They must be: A Kukkiwon-certified instructor 6th dan or higher There must be: The 3-10 members to oversee the test, which may or may not include you A place to conduct the test, in accordance with KKW regulations If testing < 6th dan, you ...


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