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10

There are two primary muscle groups at work. The ones which control the 2 larger fingers, the 1st and 2nd phalanges (thumb and index) are controlled with the larger thenar muscles, called the flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, and opponens pollicis muscles - collectively, I'll call them the thenar muscles. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th phalanges (...


9

The consensus of opinion on this, based on a brief survey of forums discussing it, is that the 3 finger grip is done for 2 reasons primarily: It reduces fatigue in the forearm muscles. If you're gripping using the middle, ring, and pinky fingers only, then you're not engaging your forearm muscles as much. Instead, you'll be using your wrist muscles ...


8

Doesn't everyone have problems with this technique. It takes some persistence but given the nature of effective application, not something one wishes to train often. Some words from me to help. Although words have different kinaesthetic interpretations for different people, but I will try. Firstly, in order to achieve Yonkyo (a pressure point), one must ...


6

In the case of sankyo (or tenkai kote hineri), the most common way to escape the technique is to drop one's elbow. Of course, a well executed tenkai kote hineri prevents that from happening. Any kote hineri (rotational wrist lock) or kote gaeshi (supinating wrist lock) can be escaped with a judicious punch aimed at Tori's nose or to be fair, any body parts. ...


5

Holds like sankyo rely on crossed extensor reflex action - the sensation of pain causes reflexive activity in other parts of the body. This is most effective when the opposing side of the body has nothing to leverage against, i.e. no wall or floor to push against. This means you can continuously adjust or tweak the hold to prevent the opponent punching or ...


5

Grabbing neck to throw This is illegal. Judo kata has many techniques that are forbidden in sport judo because it is only safe to practice them in controlled situations. As a referee I would call hansoku-make for IJF SOR: Article 18.5 (hansoku-make) - Prohibited Acts and Penalties To make any action this may endanger or injure the opponent ...


5

My first tip for you is about how you can protect your joints. Well, first try to relax your arm. If you have relaxed arms this will make it much harder for your opponent to break your grip. The grip is much more than the strength of your fingers and to break the grip your opponent must stretch your arm to the end. This technique will avoid it because you ...


4

From the Judo Chop Suey Podcast, Episode 26: Interview with Christopher Round at ~49:18, the interviewee Christopher Round, a former US Olympic hopeful, addresses this point while discussing where he reached his competitive ceiling: I started running into players who were ambidextrous. And it's very rare for a player to be very good who is ambidextrous...[...


4

Gripping daintily with only a few fingers is a drill my judo coach utilized to de-emphasize straight-arming and other gripping strategies as a defensive tactic, so one could focus on evasive footwork and hip blocks instead. Another contributing idea is that a tense grip encourages static, in-place judo, because one tries to control the opponent (through ...


4

Aside from the strength training for grips, there's also certain technique involved in grips. For example, when you hold the right arm sleeve of your opponent, make sure you grab the part right under his elbow, and grab it tight, so he is unable to move his arm properly. At the same time it's hard for him to release his harm since you can control his arm ...


3

i've always liked getting a bucket or small garbage can and filling it full of uncooked rice. you can do what we call rice grabs by jamming your fist into the rice while grabbing and releasing handfuls of rice. cheap and effective.


3

I've applied Yonkajo (Yonkyo) in fights. Especially the lock in the end is really convenient because you can apply it standing up so you can easily get away and, if done correctly, it will only hurt when the adversary tries to get out, which is psychologically useful. In my opinion the thing to get about Yonkajo is that while you can add a little bit of ...


3

Scientific modelling of judo grips The book Kumi Kata goes into detail about the mechanics of judo grips in Part I Kumi Kata Biomechanics and a survey of related researches, noting: Kumi Kata is an essential part of Judo fight, but very few scientific approaches to this problem are born in this field. In Part I Section 2: Basic Biomechanics of Grips, ...


3

We are taught to practise in bjj to use a gi (uniform) you can hang it on something strong and practise pulling up if you do not have a gi to use for this excercise you can use a belt a martial art belt if possible. It helps to work your arms and you will be able to hold on with that grip when the opponent is resisting or moving.


3

For most staff work, grips change constantly to change range and direction of attacks or parries. You have a tight grip when you expect impact, and naturally, you have to let go/slide/keep simple contact when you are moving your hands to change grip position. If you are working from a form or in a class, this is something that should be shown to you. ...


2

There is always a counter technik; also inside the Aikido (other than punching and kicking) For every technique there is a twin technique which could be used as counter, like ying yang principle. The concept is called Kaeshi waza. Of course I would not suggest to resist the sankyo grip if your opponent/partner tori has solid control over you, it might harm ...


2

We have a similar throw in the the style I practice but It's only taught to higher grade students for the reason that it's very hard to get that grip in the first place. Once you have the grip on the fingers the throw isn't too difficult but to get it requires: The receiver of the technique must have their hand open (ie not in a fist) The receiver must ...


2

A non-Aikido solution, is to simply hammerfist or punch the back of the grabber's hand or their fingers, smashing it to get free. We see twice in the video the guy gets a countergrip before the grabber shifts position and increases pressure, so the reach is there, and few people consider their hands as striking targets. There's also the possibility of ...


2

I'm usually performing a yonkyo immediately after a sankyo. I pull opponent's wrist up and twist it till it the tension is big enough (sankyo). Then I release my lock slightly, so that the opp's wrist un-twists and slides a bit down. Now this is the perfect staring point to apply a yonkyo! The advantage of this method is, that you don't have to see what ...


1

The grips are much more technique that people think. To break grips you need a technique. Also to keep you grip you need a technique as well. It is helpful training some weights. Exercices that put pressure in your fingers and develop your forearm. As a sample: Dead lift Sumo dead lift Rope climbing Hammering The grip will be break when your opponent was ...


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