5

Not sure if this answer will help you; it is focused on boxing and kickboxing. But I do think that this is a good question, particularly because access to gyms (and partners) are limited due to social distancing. A lot of people may have this question and may benefit from this answer. First, there is absolutely no equivalent of "partner work" (i.e.,...


4

The scissors-kick or Kani Basami (judo) is often done in case one of the throws you tried failed. If you don't succeed, you'll end up falling to the ground in a potentially vulnerable position. And a quick warning: Kani Basami has been banned in competition Judo. There is an elevated risk of knee injury to the one receiving the throw. You can google to read ...


3

In the YouTube comments, someone points out Commenter "Gerijima" below says in japanese that the technique is called "itotoushi" (phonetically: ee-TOW TOW-oo-she) which in japanese means "thread pass through" as in the action of threading a needle. And he says this technique is in Shinya Aoki's book. Discussed a little further ...


2

I usually choose between the following options. Extract the leg Taking back your top leg is the most obvious but most complex follow-up to kani-basami. It requires some flexibility and dexterity, and your opponent can make it difficult, especially if they can grab your pant leg or shoe. But if they don't, it's feasible to pull your top knee to the mat as you ...


2

It depends on context. The question is tagged "wrestling" and "groundwork" but, as others have pointed out, this move may not be "competition legal", depending on your rule set. By contrast, it is legal in many karate rule sets and, using your picture as the model, a left-legged kakato-geri (heel kick) would be an obvious ...


1

From the perspective of Capoeira (my current style), during a typical exchange in the roda, if you've dumped the other person to the ground without touching it yourself with anything other than the allowed hands, feet, and head, you've already won the exchange, so you will typically either just extract yourself and help your opponent up, or mock a "...


1

There are two main followups one for each of two separate situations. Competition: You move to a pin or a "ground and pound" position taking advantage of the fact that you can move on top of your opponent. Everywhere else: Roll away and stand up quick. You don't want to be on the ground when his friends show up. In situation 2 you actually ...


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