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26

I'm 15 and would like to start martial arts when I turn 16. I want a year to get myself in to really good shape before I start. This is a terrible plan. Find a gym and start training judo now. Find a proven strength program and start following it at the same time. Putting things off a year, most of the time, just means you're choosing not to do it. In the ...


14

First, you need to ask your instructors and senior students about anything you see them turning their noses up to. Do this reflexively. Always ask why. If they have no good answer for you, other than that they just don't do it, then that's your answer. Otherwise, this is the sort of question that will lead to a much better understanding of Brazilian ...


9

This probably should go without saying, but you will learn to do what you train to do. If you only train your ukemi as "If they use technique A, use breakfall B", you're probably not going to think of it when you trip instead. To some degree, randori or just training a variety of techniques will teach you how to fall properly spontaneously because you're ...


8

Most throws in BJJ descend from western wrestling, or Judo. In both of these arts, the focus is on taking the opponents balance. Resisting one of these throws does not matter much: if someone is good, you can strain all you like against their seio nage, but basic physics cannot be violated, and if your balance is taken you will end up safely thrown to ...


7

I find wristlock throws to sometimes be frowned upon because they are somewhat dangerous due to the speed with which they must be applied to be successful, and their unfamiliarity. Unfamiliarity can be fixed, just like leglocks are currently undergoing a normalization process in the community, or like wristlocks-as-a-submission are better recognized in BJJ....


5

A - Elements of good punch Hit with your shoulder not hand (focus on the shoulder and not the peripherals). Hips turning in the direction of the attack Rear leg pushing hips in the direction of the attack (on ball of the foot) Position of front leg should be enough to hold you in place and not falling forwards or becoming stuck in place. As a general rule: ...


5

Aikido is actually quite limited in its scope. There aren't many kinds of strikes, take-downs, and throws. Hapkido has a lot more striking than Aikido does, and a lot more types of throws. But it, too, is limited. When someone says there are thousands of techniques, what they're referring to are variations and combinations. But to get to that high count, ...


5

Large indefinite numbers (a zillion!) are a quirk of language. Ten thousand (myriad) techniques is simply a place holder for all the many techniques. There are not exactly 10,000 techniques as opposed to 10,001. The largest Chinese number grouping used to be wan, 10,000. [20,000 is two wan, not 20 thousands]. The Japanese also used this number grouping, ...


4

As a MMA practicionner with 20 years of combat sports, here's my 2 cents/ideas : kicking practice helps keeps legs strong, FLEXIBLE and AGILE (very important) the fact that 'they are rarely used' does not mean u can't use them if your good enough not to get caught when throwing them (therefore you really need to practice) A kick can be as effective as you ...


4

Is 16 to[o] late of an age to start hapkido or judo? It's a good age to start training... young enough to pick up flexibility, condition, strength, fitness etc. fairly easily, recover quickly between training sessions, but old enough not to be too frail or struggle to understand the subtleties of body mechanics, tactics, etc.. What were you guys like ...


4

First and foremost, if you do not trust your instructor, it makes no sense whatsoever to train with them… Therefore you should trust them in teaching you useful things, in helping you progress, and in keeping you safe in class. This means that you should trust them when they say you reached a new grade. Second, a grading is you demonstrating that you can do ...


4

It depends on your definition of technique. Take oshi taoshi (or ikkajo or ikkyo or whatever it's called in your style of Aikido) as a technique. You can do it standing up with your left arm grabbed (straight and reversed) and your right arm grabbed(straight and reversed) with one hand, then with two hands. That's eight techniques right? Okay, now against a ...


3

It's never too late to start training. The best martial art for someone who is untrained and inflexible is yoga, running, and strength training (perhaps with one or two 16kg kettlebells). Spend six months becoming strong, fit, and flexible on your own terms. You cannot trust that a martial arts school will do it for you.


3

If you are interested in sport competition among the three options you have presented, I would choose taekwondo. Taekwondo has sanctioned sport competition, whereas hapkido and wing chun are more self-defense oriented. The specific schools around you may differ, but I would expect the sport opportunities to be greatest in taekwondo. It's never too late to ...


3

Honestly, you should just get out there and start. The best way to get into the shape you need to be in to be good at a martial art is to practice that martial art. It doesn't matter if you are a 200 lbs overweight person or a 30 lbs underweight skinny-fat person(me when I started), don't worry about being in shape to start, just start and the changes will ...


3

Start now. Most places will let you take a class or two free if you are a newcomer. That being said don't limit yourself to just Judo or Hapkido. Give your local Brazilian Jujitsu,Karate,TKD,and Aikido schools a try. Work on finding the right "fit" for you and it will be a much more enjoyable experience. PS Good luck and yes if you do find a good school ...


3

I am an Aikido practitioner, but I think it is very similar to Hapkido in this regard. The answer is: YES First of all, the belt test is not only to examine if you have advanced enough, but also to see how do you perform under stress. Being able to use the techniques under some controlled stress conditions is a crucial part of martial arts. As it is not ...


3

Its never to late to start martial arts as a hobby. If you should have higher hopes to do that on a professional level, it depends a lot on which martial arts you want to do. There are several cases in mixed martial arts where people became professionals, even though they started relatively late, even some of them with no prior martial arts expierence. ...


3

In some ways, I see this as similar to the argument about flips in Parkour. Since the basis of Parkour is the most efficient movement that you can accomplish to get from Point A to Point B, flips are sometimes seen as antithetical to proper Parkour, something to be relegated to "Freerunning" or "Tricking" where your goal is as much about presentation as it ...


3

So far as my knowledge reaches, I can only answer the first part of your question. Yes, there are many arts which practice the spinning kick. My favorite: Capoeira. The "back spinning heel kick" is generally known as "Meia Lua de Compasso"—variations may apply. The "back spinning hook kick" is known as the "Gancho"—again, variations may apply across schools


3

Trepidation is normal. You have expectations about what rank means, and you are not sure whether you can live up to the expectations of a new rank. Many people have this reaction. Analogy: Learning/Teaching Martial Arts is like Painting a Wall A good analogy for the initial promotion process is painting a wall. You want the wall to look good, but it's not ...


2

The only real value in learning the mechanics of big, spinning, haymaker attacks is being able to accurately gauge an opponents telegraphs and punish them accordingly. Mechanically speaking, these techniques tend to be slow and overpowered. Thus, their practicality is low for use against a non-compliant opponent. Plus, it is always, always, always a bad idea ...


2

The techniques you describe are two separate techniques in Taekwon-do, at least in ITF Taekwon-do. The spinning heel kick is called bandae dollyo chagi and the spinning hook kick is called bandae goro chagi. Since Hapkido is a Korean martial art it may have its roots in Taek Kyon which as far as I know was mainly a kicking art which was also one of the ...


2

I'm 25 years old... Some people around me talk that it's too late for me to start learning martial art now, but I want to give it a try. I personally started Taekwondo when I was 27; 15 years later, I'm a second degree black belt and still training. In the school I train at, we have a gentleman who started after he retired (mid-late 60s). He is now a 1st ...


2

Chuck Norris started martial arts at 19. Aside from the hype, he was actually a world champion. He did Judo and Jiu Jitsu too.


2

Depends on the instructor. I've encountered instructors who promote people way too quickly. When I was looking for an instructor to train with in college, I encountered a school that would routinely promote people to black belts in tae kwon do within two years. (I ended up not training with them). With that said, if I'm understanding your question correctly, ...


2

So you're in your 60's, in good shape, and you've been practicing Yang style Taiji. You're now looking to branch out and train in a style that has an emphasis on practical self-defense, which should have a mix of striking and grappling. First let's talk about the age thing. Being in your 60's doesn't necessarily mean you can't do certain martial arts or are ...


2

There are only so many ways to manipulate the joints, and there are a finite number of joints. So logically, there are only a few basic joint manipulation techniques to begin with. Adding in different ways that the attacker can attack, and the multiple ways that the attack can be blocked and redirected into a joint lock, simply multiplies those basic ...


1

They most definitely are applicable in real situations. In our club, we call it investing in your old day. With that, we mean that even if you don't do martial arts, practicing proper falling technique will limit injuries when you're old. Also outside of martial arts, falling techniques are often practiced by cyclists and the likes, to avoid exactly the ...


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