Hot answers tagged

27

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


14

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


13

Yes! Martial arts can help you with posture, improve you overall fitness and stamina, and give you the discipline to do things correctly. No! There are much better ways to get a good posture and behaviour while working at a desk than joining a martial art class. You can see a physiotherapist, get a new chair, have a work station safety analysis done, take ...


12

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


11

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


11

Worry about blood-borne diseases is overblown. I practice judo, which has very similar training practices to BJJ. Over the years, I have seen many injuries and even a death by heart attack, but I am not aware of any transmission of a blood-borne disease. Bleeding is not an everyday occurrence. And you should certainly not be in the position where both you ...


10

Aikido sounds like something you should check out. I would seek a ki-aikido school, if such existed where you lived based on your comment on "spiritual peace". Aikido generally relies on re-directing the attackers' momentum (and creating opportunity to do so) to either throw or pin. Technique is more important than strength and I have seen tiny females ...


9

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


9

Yes, playing judo introduces the risk of brain injury. Judo is a contact sport. Competitive judo is a very contact sport. If you play rough and don't take ukemi properly, you risk concussion. The risk is not as great as in boxing or striking arts. The risk is manageable for nearly all trainees, especially people who don't compete at the elite levels or who ...


9

While it is essential that you get enough protein (and calories by the way) in your daily diet if you want to build muscle, it turns out that the timing of it is not important at all. Studies show that consuming protein right before, after, or during a weight-training workout doesn't gain you anything. This is despite what you've heard from weightlifters and ...


9

You should not expect to see a study that tries to quantify the effect of martial arts on lifespan. There are too many variables involved in this process: genetics, diet, sleep patterns, stress, environment, other exercise, etc. And while it is possible to determine what kills you, there is not a corresponding causation for what keeps you alive. The number ...


8

The main thing to understand is that your are in charge of how you train. So if you would like to train light contact, or no contact at all, you should be able to. If your club does not respect that, they are not worthy: Martial Arts nowadays is not as it used to be in terms of need. We need it less for warfare and more for self-defence. As different people ...


8

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


8

All martial arts—if properly understood—can lead to "spiritual peace" (that's in quotes because in context, this would mean [the second half of] "calm"; but explaining that is a whole chapter of a book). Examples Ju Do "judo" (the gentle way). Understand its concepts and you need not exert any strength at all. Tai Chi: ...


8

This is actually a very valid question. Consider that the NFL (U.S. football) is now going through a kind of falling out period whereby the athletes are becoming more and more aware of the growing risk of chronic brain injury over time. In the UFC, we're starting to see some questions regarding brain injury rates as well. And for a long time, we've known ...


7

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


7

Based on this NYTimes article: The frequency of judo deaths in Japan gives 108 deaths since 1983. I will not paraphrase the article but other nationality report no deaths in the last decade or so. I am going to assume that those deaths were directly resulting from judo and not just happened while judo was going on. Thus your risk of dying are increased if ...


6

You need ask yourself a question: What do I want to achieve in martial arts? If you want a sport first place - injury guaranteed If you want the cultural experience - no injury If you want self-defense - depends on the system, injury might occur Usually martial arts are without contact or more usually instructors are keeping everyone safe so nothing ...


6

The main risk for a detached retina is head impact, not necessarily eye impact. Although, yes, you want to avoid getting punched, kicked, or poked in the eyes. Although it does put an emphasis on falling safely and gently, Aikido still results in high impact forces hitting the ground. This is especially true with a technique like irimi nage which requires a ...


6

As @mattm states, the risk of transmission is low. This does not mean that it doesn't exist, but the likelihood of it happening is actually very low. Just from a knowledge standpoint, you are much more likely to contract a bloodborne pathogen (BBP) other than HIV. HIV is actually somewhat low on the virulence scale, in that you need more exposure than other ...


5

What is a concussion? In the last few years we've gotten a lot more info on them, and literally, they are brain damage. What makes them especially dangerous is that concussions can be extremely unpredictable in terms of cause to effect - sure, getting hit harder in the head is worse, but sometimes lighter hits can cause severe concussions or heavier hits ...


5

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


5

The best thing i can say is to strengthen you shin and calf muscles a lot. This can help prevent future injuries. Start doing calf raises and if you have some sort or wrist or ankle weight (or a dumbell if you can balance it) that you can put on your foot and bend your foot up and down to work your shin muscles. I do not know the extent of your injury so ...


5

I think you can answer two-way to your questions. 1st, long term risk to your body depends on how you train. If you have bad habits, and you apply useless strain on your body, it WILL catch up to you (at 40 some morning I feel like I have the knees and the back of a 60's). But it's also part my fault. My mom (who was also my 1st coach) always told me to ...


5

Cold/hot flush Here's a trick I learned from a coach & sports medicine expert - after a workout, soak cold for 10 minutes then soak hot/warm after. I started doing that and found my own soreness reduced by 2/3rds (of course, pain is subjective so...) He typically dumped his players into a tub with ice, I'm not as hardcore so I just use a cold bath ...


5

First of all, I think you can shop around in your local area and try to find schools that share your mindset. Chances are there are some. You just have to talk with the instructors and see what the classes are like. I'm not exactly sure how karate has changed over the years to become more violent, as you noticed. To me, it looks like it hasn't changed at ...


5

There's two things that increase stamina: cardio (fast, regular movement) and muscle endurance. Pretty much any regular movement can do that - Shaolin training or anything else. You can do a few minutes every day up to the recommended at least 30 minutes of cardio that doctors recommend, and of course, more once you get the endurance going. Understand ...


5

According to the following paper, Injuries in judo: a systematic literature review including suggestions for prevention: severe injuries in judo are rare, but when they do occur they are mostly to the brain and spine, mostly occur during throws (as opposed to chokes), and mostly occur due to 'bad falling' repeatedly being thrown (as a competitive judoka) ...


5

Honestly, I think that Giulia Enders is using an artistic metaphor to conjure an idea of someone squatting in a relaxed but engaged position in much the same way that you might describe someone attentively awaiting a piece of post as "standing still at the door like a dog pointing" or bracing for a date rejection as "standing lightly on the balls of his feet,...


4

Yes! I have a very strong opinion on this because of my accidental discovery. I was a very sedentary techno-geek and starting to get a lot of back pain, which I babied in fear of worsening. Then my daughter got promoted to the adult class in Karate, because she was too tall. I joined, because I prefer to do things together, and I would otherwise be sitting ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible