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6

I think Sylvie conveys the right feeling in this article: I’ve fought over 100 times in Thailand and honestly I have never had a completely clear picture of what is and is not a legal throw in Muay Thai. There are some very obvious fouls, but others seem a gray area. I’ve had a vague sense that you cannot lift an opponent, or that you can’t “back break”, ...


5

Yes. Contrary to what the average "expert" on swords and Japanese swordsmanship will tell you online (along with their obligatory mentions to Miyamoto Musashi who everyone obligatorily must mention whenever dual-wielding Japanese swords is discussed even though in his own book he clearly states using two swords is nothing new in Japan and there ...


5

Throwing someone is difficult and depends on particular openings, balance, and grips; staying standing is the easier "default". In contrast, pins are the opposite: the escape is difficult and depends on particular openings, weight distributions, and grips; staying on top of someone who has already been pinned is the easier default. Standing ...


4

In my BJJ school, we said, "Oss!" with a bow to the teacher and moved our elbows backwards with fists clenched to signify readiness to move on to practice the move after instruction. It's a cool way to have everyone speak in unison and to signify a shift in the action. I never thought about the origin of the word. Outside of class, I've said "oss!" to ...


4

I'm Brazilian and a purple belt in BJJ. What I would say it that it's about experience and some reading. "Oss" or "Ossu" its a Japanese word meaning understood or agreed. The history of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is quite interesting because of it's being an improvement of a Japanese martial art and it has a lot in common with judo and other Japanese martial arts. ...


3

Outside of the question of efficacy, the authenticity of the Bujinkan system is indeed disputed. Masaaki Hatsumi claims to have received the teachings directly from Toshitsugu Takamatsu, who claimed to be heir to ninja traditions. However, as per Wikipedia: The 1963 version of the Bugei Ryūha Daijiten indicates of Takamatsu's Togakure-ryu: "this ...


3

There are no specific physical requirements for sumo. The rules and culture of sumo reward being as big and strong as possible. There is no benefit to being lean or cutting body fat, so rikishi (sumo wrestlers) simply don't. They get brutally strong, and have simply enormous muscles hidden under their fat. Many pro sumo wrestlers match or exceed the muscle ...


2

Asia was doing martial arts in war, well into the 19th century. Western martial arts died out with the advent of the ever improving gun. The biggest misconception of martial arts is that it only stemmed from Asia. Unarmed martial arts is attributed to Asia, but there are some, albeit fewer, less unarmed, styles out of Europe than in Asia. The thing about ...


2

The correct term is actually 'Ping-An', which means 'Safety' in Chinese. They are from original Karate (China Hand), and were part of a larger form. In the late 1800's, Anko Itosu broke the form down into smaller subsets and branded them with the name 'Ping-An'. Students of his, such as Funakoshi, learned these and incorporated them into their arts later on. ...


2

There are two different schools of thought on each of two subjects in martial arts. The first subject is To what Extent do we allow out practitioners to be Injured? Some styles such as Maui Thai are happy for every practitioner's career to be short. They fight a few times, generally get badly injured one way or another and then become coaches for the ...


2

Wrestling and judo were not unknown, but particularly outside of Olympic season generally weren't featured much. Pancrase, shootwrestling etc. were largely a curiosity among pro wrestling enthusiasts. BJJ was featured in movies like Lethal Weapon but exploded after UFC1.


1

I can only comment definitively on the dan pai wudang system, as opposed to fu pai or chou pai, which was passed to me from my teacher via two students of Li Jing Lin. I was taught it is the wrist cut. Wrists are the closest target Slicing the tendons ends combat Minimal contact with bone to preserve the edge In wudang we use the waist and much of the ...


1

I just watched a video to see Glima wrestling in action. Looks like it requires a lot of upper body strength and more time standing than in ground control. Plus, at least one big difference. No pin or tap. Just escape to win. Interesting. I learned something new today. Here's an article with more information, The Gripping History of Glima, featuring an old ...


1

China has a historic pattern of suppressing effective martial arts, and sponsoring less combat-effective ones. For example, from this article: But the Emei Style was already dead by the time the Red Guards showed up. Throughout Chinese history, governments have routinely supported, and then cracked-down upon, martial arts. In times of war, martial artists ...


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