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8

Short answer: just ask. Explain your previous training to the sensei (without bragging*). He/she will make the decision. At the very least I think they would be glad to show off their skills even if they will not teach you right away. They should be willing to preview the curriculum enough for you to make the decision to join or not based on what you ...


5

First, don't drill anything you haven't been taught in person by a good teacher. You can learn a lot watching videos, but videos don't give you feedback and correction. I'm worried that you'll be drilling the wrong movement, and that will make it hard to undo later on. Drilling should only be done when you're getting feedback and are actively making ...


5

To clarify a couple of points in other answers: Weight: lighter bokken feel rather different to a katana. As already noted, you can do techniques with a kendo shinai that are not possible with a katana unless you are Conan the Barbarian! This is due to the light weight of the shinai vs a katana. A heavier bokken will be closer to the weight of a katana and ...


4

Iaido is roughly translated as "the way of the quick draw". You can think of it as a class of different martial arts, not a style in and of itself. The actual style will have a proper name like Muso Shinden Ryu. So in that case, it is called Muso Shinden Ryu Iaido (but most people just refer to it as Muso Shinden Ryu, since iaido describes pretty much ...


3

See if you find a dojo practicing the Nishio school of Aikido. They place a lot of focus on katana and stick fighting... https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nishio+aikido As you can see, many of the classic Aikido techniques stem from swordfighting; and Nishio placed a lot of focus to show this relationship (much more so than other styles). There ...


3

Don't discount Kendo yet! The shinai was created to reduce the risk of injuries during the practice of swordsmanship. Combined with the bogu, it allows for semi-realistic combat practice. While I'll readily admit that the kendo rules are far removed from those of an actual battlefield, the same could be said about boxing, or most martial arts, in fact. ...


3

Disclaimer- I am not a Japanese speaker. Short Answer: Don't worry about it. Longer Answer: The suffix -jutsu means 'practice of', the suffix -do means 'study of'. I have been taught by Japanese instructors who have used both or changed for emphasis. Historically, martial arts tended to be called something-jutsu because they taught you how to do something....


2

I wouldn't say it is rude to ask, and you can always ask for an explanation for the rule. My original dojo had a similar rule (you had to be 6th kyu). The reason being, it takes a lot more effort to initially get someone up and going in weapons practice than it does in the normal empty hand practice. My instructor only wanted to take the time to teach ...


2

The difference between iaido and iaijutsu is analogous to the difference between judo and jujutsu: Iaidō derives from older Japanese martial traditions and has historically been referred to as “iaijutsu.” While “iaijutsu” continues to be used today, the term now refers to more traditional practices rooted in martial applications, while “iaidō” refers to ...


2

Kendo is hitting real people with a pretend sword. Iaido is pretending to hit people with a blunt sword. Tamashigiri is really hitting pretend people with a sharp sword.


2

It did help me. The problem is not so much whether the art itself helps, but whether the teacher teaches it in a way that helps. More specifically, when I started out with Aikido, my first sensei taught the Nishio style. You can look it up on Youtube, there is a full DVD with the original Nishio guy to be found there. The specialty of Nishio is that he ...


2

It will not help You will get the same problems in relaxation, centring, and breathing1 in Iaido as you get in Aikido. In addition, Iaido will confuse your Aikido weapon work unless you keep them very separate. Ueshiba trained in lots of different arts that influenced his Aikido. Most of his weapon work was done when he was a young man in his prime. Iwama ...


2

Since you are in a location (Paris) that has a plethora of dojo, I would strongly suggest you check out as many different styles as you can1. In summary, look at places and chose the one where you have the most fun. As Dungath states in his answer, do not discount Kendo. Some clubs will be very physical and might well teach iaido as well. But if it is ...


1

I don't practice Iaido or Kendo myself, but I will have a stab at answering this. As Iaido is often practised Solo this is perhaps one of the few styles that could be learned with minimal input from an instructor. Kendo would be much harder to learn in this way as it is a pair form style with blunt sword substitutes and is designed for competition in ...


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