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Any sanctioned event will have event medical staff on hand to revive competitors immediately if they do not regain consciousness on their own. Medical staff may recommend hospital treatment. There are two distinct cases for restricting activities afterward depending on how one becomes unconscious. I don't know what the guidelines are for MMA specifically, ...


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There isn't really a "mistake", it's more of an unfortunate confluence of events. Any site that claims it takes X lbs of pressure to break a bone are sort of misleading. There are differences in bone structure from person to person, and it very much depends on the angle, load, time and other factors. The tibia (shinbone) is sort of prism shaped, ...


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Your claims in the question are quite correct, and none of the contents below intend to refute your statements. There are a few aspects that should be considered when answering this question: What is your primary target? If your target is below chest-level, it would be virtually impossible to use an palm strike without hurting the wrist. I used to be a big ...


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Kicks to the calf aren't generally going to do as much damage as kicks to the thigh. That's because of two reasons: 1) The thigh is less mobile. And 2) The thigh has more mass and is a bigger target. Most trained fighters will lift up their leg when they see a kick coming to their calf. It's quick and easy to do. But it's not easy to get out of the way of a ...


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Erm...it is really hard to stab someone once so that it is lethal within, say, 30 Minutes. People can go on fighting with 10+ stab wounds for quite some time and the rib cage is quite a good protection. In other words: Your assumption is flawed. It is hard to stab deeply in a fight. It is hard to get by the ribs. It is hard to inflict a lethal injury. Stabs ...


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Considering the viability of short-range grappling techniques, the loss of three inches of range should not be a major concern. The basic grappling strategy is to quickly close distance when entering striking distance, and this strategy works for striking as well. You already have to do this to hit someone in the head because you must move through kicking ...


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I'm going to rebut some things that you mention. This rebuttal might seem subtle or pedantic, but that subtlety is hugely important. most people using closed fists during a fight run significant risk of hand/knuckle damage It depends on what you mean by most people. If you include untrained people in that group then yes, they do run a risk of injury - but ...


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Adding my two cents to very good Steve's answer. Some additional points for being thigh kicks more dangerous: calf can be (and usually is) conditioned much better, than thigh. hitting thigh with your shin is generally better, because your shin is obviously more solid - here you are hitting-soft-with-hardness hitting thigh injures your opponent's muscles ...


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Tendons are a 3d lattice structure, and generally fairly strong. They are strengthened in the same way that muscles are, however where a muscle will recover in 24-48 hours from a training session, tendons take 48-72 hours. There is a good breakdown here with some referenced studies on how to make them stronger with supplementation and training. As far as ...


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Incorrect kicking mechanics. I’m a Muay Thai practitioner, and have never noticed a Thai break their leg in Thailand. This might be because in Muay Thai, we are taught to kick from the hip with a straight leg on impact, which is landing with the shin on the opponent. Most of the martial artists that are breaking their legs in the UFC seem to be snapping ...


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So far, doing a casual check, I've found two cases of MMA fighters breaking their leg on a checked leg kick, and at least two of people having their legs broken by receiving a leg kick, so the record seem reasonably even, not counting the non-fracture results of leg kicks slowing people down, putting them in pain, etc, so I think there might be more of an ...


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Here is my attempt at answering this question based on the research I have done, happy for others to comment or add another better answer. On this website, fractures incur a 180 day medical suspension, and joint injuries 60 day medical suspensions. Therefore the logical answer would be that clearance wouldn't be given until this period has lapsed, although ...


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