25

They are the same thing. It's only a matter of romanization (spelling japanese words using roman letters). As a reference point, here is how it is pronounced in japanese (found on wikipedia). As to how it is written, it all comes down to how the names were romanized. The most popular systems used today are probably the Hepburn system, the Nihon-Shiki ...


12

It's similar to the concept of shaking hands with your right hand. The majority of people are right handed, so when shaking hands you present this hand and clasp to show you do not have weapons. With a sword, a right-handed person draws faster for combat with the sword on the left side of the body. In this example, the draw motion continues directly into ...


12

"Ju-jutsu" and "jiu-jitsu" are different romanizations of the same Japanese word(s) 柔術. This is analogous to how we have both "Qur'an" and "Koran" from the Arabic الْقُرْآن‎. 柔術 was historically spelled with hiragana1 2 like so: じうじゆつ Individually these characters are transliterated:3 じ う じ ゆ つ ji u ji yu tsu but when occurring together, some of these ...


12

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


11

In Japanese, some6 initial consonants become voiced when they occur internal to some5 compound words, e.g: kimono / judo-gi koshi-guruma / o-goshi katame-waza / kesa-gatame shime-waza / hadaka-jime tori / kata-ashi-dori hon-kesa-gatamae / ippon hasami-jime / kani-basami This process is called rendaku, and the conditions under which it applies are ...


10

Sounds like a quote from Kisshomaru Ueshiba in "The Spirit of Aikido" (合氣道のこころ). I don't have the English version to compare, but in the Japanese version it's the first line of the first chapter: 合氣道は、いうまでもなく本質的に武道である。 Kisshomaru expressed the same sentiment many times - his father may have as well, but I don't recall off hand. Morihei more often talked ...


10

I've studied iaido for five years, and practiced a variety of styles under one teacher (that's how much my words are worth). In general, parries, blocks and deflections are done with the side or the back of the sword. It provides a very convenient yin/yang balance to the movements, where you can draw from your opponent's strike and smoothly deflect it, then ...


9

The following translations (by Victor Harris and Thomas Cleary) instead translate the phrase as "Direct Communication": The spirit of "Direct Communication" is how the true Way of the Ni To Ichi school is received and handed down. The corresponding passage in Japanese (possibly modernized Japanese) is: わたしは、勝利に直結するあり方を、わが流派の道としてお伝えします。 よく練習して、...


9

Ukemi's answer is much more accurate than mine. If you are referring to 柔術, then we can look at the two kanji. The first kanji is found in 柔道 -- judo. The second kanji is found in 剣術 -- Kenjutsu. Thus, I would opt for jujutsu as being the logical romanji form of 柔術. The other "spelling" maybe viewed as either incorrect or illogical based on this. Thus, I ...


7

I haven't been able to find a reference to that direct quote. There are a number of things that mean the same thing. O'Sensei appears to have spoken often about being on a quest to find the perfect Budo, and that Aikido (or Aiki Budo) is the result of that search. The closest quote I've found is: "On reflection, Aikido can be seen as the root source of ...


7

You've answered your own question. It's etiquette. Right-hand means you don't expect to use your sword. Left-hand means you're ready for action. The Samurai had loads of rules and etiquette to abide by. This code of conduct is called Bushido (the way of the warrior). It's a lot like the Western concept of Chivalry. In modern terms, it would be like carrying ...


6

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


6

Upon seeing that all the newbies in the class were right-handed, my Kendo sensei told us the following: "I'm sorry everyone but, in Kendo, everyone is left-handed." We really thought it was weird, seeing as the way we had to hold the shinai felt really natural, with the right hand near the tsuba and the left hand at the opposite end of the tsuka. We soon ...


6

In Germany those two refer to different things but that is a special case: Jiu-Jitsu in Germany is usually used for the traditional japanese system and related styles while Ju-Jutsu is used for a system developed in the 1960s for German police forces. So in Germany those two are different but that does only hold for Germany because everywhere else the German ...


5

If the image below describes the technique accurately, I would say it is because uke's legs form a wheel (or a circle) in the air. However, I have no official source for this.


5

Tomoe (巴) refers to a circular anti-symmetric symbol commonly found in Japanese heraldry. The usage in the judo throw specifically refers to the two-tailed version, futatsu-domoe: This is very similar to the Chinese taijitu ("yin-yang" symbol) ☯, or Korean taegeuk (famously appearing on South Korea's flag) 🇰🇷. Tomoe-nage is named as such because Kano ...


5

When translating foreign technique names, sometimes there isn't a perfect analogue in the target language e.g. "tomoe" in tomoe-nage translated as 'circle'. The "kesa" (袈裟) in kesa-gatame in fact refers to a type of buddhist robe, the Kāṣāya. While historically it was worn covering both shoulders, in current Japanese Buddhist style it is wrapped across the ...


4

Japanese martial arts traditionally do not block. The theory is Evade and Strike. An easy way to consider this is to look at the footwork. In Aikido, your hanmi is not a strong stance to block, but it's a great stance for moving and evading. With this mindset, I have trouble believing that there is a proper "Block". I can't think of any time I've been ...


4

There is also a small reference work called "Aikido Terminology: An essential reference tool in both English and Japanese." The book has very thorough explanation of the language -- with things grouped usefully, (e.g. "stances", "etiquette", etc). It very clearly explains the words in English and Japanese including pronunciation.


4

I believe these are spelling variations - wikipedia lists both of these as acceptable transliteration of the Japanese word. Of course I'm not fluent in Japanese, so I would defer to someone who is.


4

Virmaior at japanese.se answered my question. Here is what he said: Your kanji are correct. 受け身. You can also write it 受身. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it ...


4

Well, technically 'Guruma' implies a 'rotation', so like in Ashi Guruma in Osoto Guruma you're not just reaping two legs, you're leading your opponent towards a rotating movement around your leg, just like Ashi Guruma. Wheel just indicates the rotation this technique implies. The difference between Osoto Guruma and Osoto Gari, if you will is similar to the ...


4

引き /hiki/ meaning "pulling; drawing back" might fit, though it doesn't begin with w.


4

I feel that this question can be split in two sub-questions: Is shaking hands bad etiquette in Japan? Does this apply to (Japanese) Judo? While I have trained in Judo for a few years, my best insight for this question comes from my current training at a Kyokushin dojo. As such, I feel like I can readily answer (1), but probably not (2). In Kyokushin ...


3

Don't discount Kendo yet! The shinai was created to reduce the risk of injuries during the practice of swordsmanship. Combined with the bogu, it allows for semi-realistic combat practice. While I'll readily admit that the kendo rules are far removed from those of an actual battlefield, the same could be said about boxing, or most martial arts, in fact. ...


3

In my BJJ school, we said, "Oss!" with a bow to the teacher and moved our elbows backwards with fists clenched to signify readiness to move on to practice the move after instruction. It's a cool way to have everyone speak in unison and to signify a shift in the action. I never thought about the origin of the word. Outside of class, I've said "oss!" to ...


3

I'm Brazilian and a purple belt in BJJ. What I would say it that it's about experience and some reading. "Oss" or "Ossu" its a Japanese word meaning understood or agreed. The history of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is quite interesting because of it's being an improvement of a Japanese martial art and it has a lot in common with judo and other Japanese martial arts. ...


3

Oss is... Also known as Osu or Ossu (オッス) The Meaning of Oss good morning (additional reference) persevering when pushed to push and to suffer1 to keep the faith1 the equivalent of a warm-handshake1 hello, yes, or I understand, (additional reference) a greeting used by young Bushi warriors of the Saga clan in the 18th and 19th centuries2 acknowledging an ...


3

From my point of view, o-soto-gari is throwing uke toward his back. You bend Uke's so his weight is on a leg, and you reap that leg. in osotoguruma, your leg act as a pivot, and you rotate him over it. You'll see it done in competition very differently than in practice : you take Uke, and pulls him toward you, and you rotate at the same time. While he ...


3

Samurai is a rather large class ranging from foot solders to the Shogun. All wore different armours. Your question spans around a thousand years of history. So, generally speaking… A few armours have stiff joints. However, they are specific armours, for example tourney jousting ones. Those are donned for specific tasks and generally require staff to put on ...


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