10

That quotation is from the "Dedication" on the inside cover of Lee's "Tao of Jeet Kune Do" It reads, "This book is dedicated to the free, creative martial artist: 'Research your own experience; absorb what is useful, reject what is useless and add what is essentially your own.' " That may also appear elsewhere in the book, but I could not find it while ...


8

What is the most effective method for the roundhouse kick? You've got a one-adjective criteria there, and a vague one: effective. Overall effectiveness might reasonably be defined as what helps you win reliably, or perhaps you'd prefer something less reliable if it meant the average or median injury you sustain is less even though the worst case outcome's ...


7

Bruce Lee's training partner, Dan Inosanto, gives some insight in an interview for the book The Masters Speak in regards to forms (emphasis mine): Q: What do you think about forms? A: I have to say that Bruce was not anti-form and neither am I. Forms or katas are a way to learning proper body mechanics. Forms can be a part of your training, but your ...


6

Practice at home footwork and angling. Speed is what will save you. When you move around a person they move faster because they just rotate on the pivot point. Timing your angled footwork lets you face their center point outside of there strikes if timed right. Control fighting distance. JKD secret is to make the other guy move first into range where you ...


6

This is a standard exercise in Shodokan Aikido (required for every test). We call it either "Randori" or "Jiyu Waza". We don't standardize it the way you're asking. (In Chinese martial arts, the term may be Sanshou, but I'm not sure that is standardized. Closer to Kumite) My school used to do 4 attackers, 90 seconds, with each attacker starting their ...


6

I teach Kyokushin karate and I've taught the many different ways a roundhouse kick can be executed. However these can be boiled by 2 different characteristics: the striking area (i.e. Ball of feet, instep and lower shin) and the power mechanics. With power mechanics there are 3 distinct forms: 1st the TKD style where the leg is brought up vertically like a ...


6

Source of quote Bruce read widely and took aphorisms from many different sources, incorporating them into his writings on his own martial arts and philosophy. The idea behind this quote is ancient,1 but this specific wording appears to come from Mao Zedong: All military laws and military theories which are in the nature of principles are the experience ...


6

There is good kung-fu and bad kung-fu. The same is true with all martial arts. You can spot the difference when you have enough experience. I disagree that kung-fu in general is messy or sloppy. If you're seeing unfocused strikes and movement that seems like it's weak and uncoordinated, then you're probably watching poorly done kung-fu. And there is a lot of ...


5

According to the wikiquote page for this, the origin of the quote is given for the book Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee's Wisdom for Daily Living, published in 2000 and edited by John Little, Part III Part II. (Thanks to @ukemi for the correct section reference) Part III : On Matters of Existence Part Two - On Being Human - Concepts (Abstracting) Balance your ...


4

This quote can be found in Part Two - On Being Human - Concepts (Abstracting) of Striking Thoughts: Bruce Lee's Wisdom for Daily Living (p43): Balance your thoughts with action. — If you spend too much time thinking about a thing, you'll never get it done. In the introduction, A Book For Free Spirits, John Little writes this of the sources of the quotes: ...


4

The "purpose"? To hurt people, relatively quickly. It's not terribly close to anything you list in terms of stylistic similarities, but it depends a lot on which version of Silat you're discussing. E.g., Maphalindo silat (Guro Dan) is different from a "purer" strain. My silat training has been mostly empty-hands, but as with kali, most techniques work ...


4

I am not someone who has studied the style, so I cannot give insider information, but my understanding is that Silat as a single martial arts style is about as informative as referring to Kung Fu or Swordfighting as a style. The name actually incorporates a wide variety of styles that only share a few common aspects and otherwise differ greatly. That said, ...


4

That drill exists in a lot of different martial arts, each of which have tailored it to their unique style. I think each style calls it something different, and some don't call it anything at all, so you might be out of luck there. Schools with a penchant for the dramatic will probably call it "circle of death" or something like that (I'm looking at you, ...


4

Buy the Tao of Jeet Kune Do. Because Reasons: The Tao of Jeet Kune Do is Bruce's treatise on his philosophy - the philosophy which underpins his later teachings. Absolute beginners should find teachers, not books, to learn technique from. You can try copying the stuff in "Bruce Lee's Fighting Method", but until you already have a basis in martial arts, ...


4

I don't study JKD, but in other arts I've found that going from the outside (kicking or long punching range) to the clinch (wrestling or dirty boxing range) can be done with a front-leg kick or a jab that the opponent is not expecting to be followed up by a crash in.


4

A fake jumping kick works wonders. I am by no means a JKD expert, but I've found that faking a flying kick works well. Both in JKD and in Taekwondo. The idea is to sucker your opponent into counter-attacking, and then intercepting the counter.


4

You don't seem to be asking about "posture" in the narrow sense, but rather how to improve your entire body positioning for all techniques. This is the majority of martial arts practice. Your best bet for improving body position for JKD techniques is to make sure you're strong and mobile enough to do all the postures correctly, and to go to class as much as ...


2

A vertical or rising empi is no different in principal to any other strike - you should try to have a moment of focus. The difference it does have to the other empi strikes is that it is a more unnatural movement, it is more of a short power strike. A lot of people also tend to have somewhat restricted motion when rotating the should in that way, not to ...


2

A digital camera can be good for this. Film yourself doing the movement, then watch the footage while the feel of it is still fresh in your mind. Even better, if you have a large TV near where you train, watch yourself doing the movement. That's probably the best way to be able to see, say, a side view, as you're moving.


2

It's very difficult for many of us to concentrate on distinctly different aspects of a movement or stance at the same time, so first of all don't get frustrated! It sounds like to me at the core of your question is how to "find your center", or how to achieve good balance across stances. There is a natural tendency in many students to lean forward, ...


2

Stretch a lot. Then just practice everything you are taught literally two thousand times, slowly. To start off, do a movement but stop after a centimeter. Check you are in the right position, are your hips and shoulders facing the correct way, should you be twisting, where should you hand be, what position should you feet be in, should your back be extended, ...


2

Good answers already, but I'll dump some thoughts here too... if you allow any rest between the attacks - or even enough time for the (nominal) defender to return to a guarding position, then in one sense they're facing a series of one-on-one challenges rather than facing concurrent opponents, but there are still many benefits that make it a worthwhile ...


2

There are hundreds of styles of silat. Take the entire area, assume most folks were living in villages and had fighting between other villages, pirates, raiders, and invaders for their entire existence, long before the Dutch. Then add in the influence from the Chinese, the Indians (both Hindu and Muslim) and you get a variety of styles based on what they ...


2

As one poster mentioned, rotating your waist will certainly help with power. What I would also add is that you should perhaps focus on your other arm is doing. For instance, "chambering" your other arm might also increase power (through what they call expansion/contraction). Try rifling your other arm back as you're throwing the elbow and rotating your hips ...


2

If you can't find a Jeet Kune Do school but you want to learn something similar, look for an MMA gym. Mixed Martial Arts is an outflow of Jeet Kune Do. To such an extent that Bruce Lee is referred to as "The Father of MMA". Wing Chun comprises a large portion of Jeet Kune Do, but your chances of finding a Wing Chun school that teaches proper Wing Chun are ...


2

There were three techniques which helped me a lot (and still do) when I started sparring in JKD: progressive indirect attack jamming their attack (e.g. striking their hand is it goes towards me, the essence of jeet kune do is to intercept, destroy or prevent an attack from an opponent). attack by combination (for example a simple 1-2-3 or jab, cross, lead ...


2

On the mental side, I always interpreted the quote as empty your cup metaphor. In effect, it suggests one should abandon one's preconceptions and "just" train what is shown. Many times, whoever teaches shows something that seems to be pointless, unnecessary, and even a hindrance. However, generally there is a set of reasons why a student should do this. ...


1

Fundamentally, Bruce Lee was discussing being flexible in one's training and practice of the martial arts. It's not a specific technique, but rather always being willing to consider the situation, to choose the right approach for every situation rather than to decide on a best approach and then apply it everywhere. Specifically within martial arts, this ...


1

Bruce liked Chinese food and used to have a lot of variety in his food. I don't know much about the specifics of his diet. His fitness recommendation from the Tao of Jeet Kune Do is as follows: Monday, Wednesday, Friday Skipping Forward Bend Dand Jumping Jack Squat High Kick Waist Twisting Palm-Up Curl Roman Chair Knee Drawing Side Bend Palm-Down Curl ...


1

This is a tricky one because basically 6 elbow strikes is a very strange thing to want to do anyway. Unless you're attacking with the triceps side of the elbow - say to the temple after a grasping block with your other hand has pulled them open and towards you, or down on the collar bone - an elbow making solid contact should be driving them backwards into ...


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