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In most cases, sword flex is only for the sake of durability and excessive flexibility is likely to interfere with doing proper damage with your blade. A major exception is the urumi, or "whip blade", where that flexibility is used to use it as more of a "soft weapon", able to make more use of centrifugal momentum and to curve around ...


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There are two types of steel, hard steel and soft steel. The purpose of hard steel is edge retention. The purpose of soft steel is absorbing shock. The purpose of blade flex is so the sword does not shatter on the first strike. Here's the most basic thing about swords, ANY SWORD, no matter the culture. When they hit too many hard things, they stop being ...


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I can only comment definitively on the dan pai wudang system, as opposed to fu pai or chou pai, which was passed to me from my teacher via two students of Li Jing Lin. I was taught it is the wrist cut. Wrists are the closest target Slicing the tendons ends combat Minimal contact with bone to preserve the edge In wudang we use the waist and much of the ...


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Although blade flex's primary role is durability, preventing the sword from bending/shattering/otherwise breaking... There is another benefit A certain degree of blade flex will also make cutting easier, because your blade alignment doesn't have to be perfect. This can be seen in test cutting, especially in slow-motion. More flexible swords (like tulwars/...


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Since this question hasn't yet generated an answer, here's my guess: There has been much discussion on the deficiencies of disarming technique against even an unskilled knife wielder, and swords are exponentially more dangerous, both for their range and versatility. Slapping away the attackers blade is the only defense I know of that has been proposed, and ...


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Typical Jian have a one hand, handle, thus the overall design means there's only two ways to hold it, forward grip blade facing up or backhanded with the blade upside down. Some martial manuals depict the use of Shuangshou jian or two handed sword.


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I'm going to use Major Methods of Wudang Sword as the reference, as the information comes from the last generation of Chinese fighters who used swords in combat and duels. In a sense, everything after this generation is somewhat academic, and purely in the realm of sport and performing art. In the chapter Shou Fa (Hand Techniques) The book describes two ...


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This answer relates to a tassel of sufficient length to wrap the wielder's wrist. I typically use one with a string length 9 inches, but prefer 12", which are harder to find, but, perhaps counter-intuitively, allow better control. Tassels with no string attached directly to the pommel have no function beyond aesthetics. Distract an opponent This is ...


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