13

This is a nothing lock - it is a made for television move. While Sherlock's thumb and index finger do lie along anterior wrist points used frequently with various wrist locks or throws (e.g. kotogaeshi in Aikido), this particular implementation is a waste of bandwidth and screen frames, it is a British version of Hollywood nonsense. Try it, and see how ...


13

It's hard to tell, but it looks like the dude on the right's left arm is pushed up behind his back. I hear that called that a "chicken wing", which is similar to BJJ's "Kimura", catch-wrestling's double wrist lock, and judo's ude garami. I'm sure there's a name for it in SAMBO, and aikido too. I say "similar to" because most of those techniques actually ...


10

I assume you are working on the arm bar known in judo as juji gatame. The principle in this technique is the use of a class 2 lever to hyperextend the opponent's elbow joint. Resistance is in the middle, at the opponent's elbow joint. Force is applied by pulling down at the wrist and raising the hips. The fulcrum should be one of your legs; this makes any ...


9

I prevent testicle crushage while armbarring my partners and opponents by: Pulling the arm further towards my head, so their elbow is across my pelvis and not my crotch Squeezing my knees tighter on their upper arm Wearing underwear (or lack thereof) that provides freedom of movement, so that they can move out of the way of an elbow mid-attack Not giving a ...


8

This appears to be a hammerlock or "chicken wing", held with only one hand for ostensibly artistic purposes i.e. to imply Sherlock is so skilled he only needs to utilise a very small amount of movement/control to subdue an opponent. In reality, such a hold is relatively insecure since Sherlock is not controlling Mycroft's arm/body in any way (other ...


8

Yes, omoplatas are considered a variant of ashi-gatame or hiza-gatame.1 3 The IJF Referee Commission has confirmed their legality on multiple occasions,1 2 both as a submission, and as a method of turning uke over from the turtle position: Lascau: Osaekomi. Demonstrator: *uke taps, tori points at armlock* Lascau: Ippon. Ippon. Demonstrator: [With this ...


7

Leg-locks were banned shortly after an 1899 exhibition match in Kyoto (held before Emperor Taishō) between Kodokan 3rd dan Yuji Hirooka and Fusen-ryū master Mataemon Tanabe. During the match Tanabe performed a throw and subsequently applied a leg-lock, breaking Hirooka's leg. At the next meeting of the Butoku Kai that year, Kano proposed banning leg-locks ...


7

I am going to assume we are talking about the cross body arm lock (juji gatame, in judo). It is possible to escape before an opponent sets in a joint lock tightly. This basically involves maneuvering your elbow out of your opponent's legs. It's easiest to do this if you can still move your body around effectively. It is not possible if you wait too long. ...


6

The kimura, omoplata, and barataplata are all attacks on the shoulder. The end result is the same but they apply the attack in different ways. The end result is to isolate the uke's (receiver's) shoulder joint, immobilize uke's elbow, and move uke's wrist along a path that would circle it towards their shoulder blade. A similar effect is achieved if uke's ...


6

I've been training Bjj since 1998. I always learned to squeeze my knees to prevent this pain on testicles. This is the most common way to avoid this kind of injury. But this year, when I was visiting the academy of the Master Sylvio Behring, he taught me a different approach for the arm lock (arm bar). Squeeze your knees early. He told me to close my knees ...


6

I would turn this question around and ask: How do people get standing arm-bars and joint locks on the arms of their opponents? Understanding how they do that will give you a good idea about how to defend against it. Generally, in order to perform a standing arm-bar or a grapple of some sort on the arm (like a wrist grab and twist), you can break it down ...


6

Legality of te-gatame As one might infer from their presence in the video and current syllabus, the position of the Kodokan is that these bent-arm hammerlock versions of te-gatame are legal.1 2 3 The incongruence between te-gatame appearing on the IJF's list of legal techniques and the (occasional) penalisation of it in actual competition seems to stem from ...


5

What is an "elbow-lock"? While a common misconception, armlocks which cause pain to the shoulder are not inherently illegal in Judo. The phrasing "kansetsu-waza applied to the elbow joint" is used by the Kodokan to describe joint-locks which achieve their effect by: straightening or bending the elbow joint ("locking" it in place), and stretching, bending, ...


5

The Kodokan classifies armlocks according to the position tori adopts while applying them. As such this lock (sometimes called kannuki-gatame) is indeed a variant of ude-garami, since tori holds uke's arm in place with an "entangled" figure-four position.2 This methodology for classifying armlocks can be seen in the other examples in the same video:...


4

I was taught a compression armlock by a US national referee. I am not formally familiar with the term bicep slicer, but your description of the armlock matches exactly what I learned. It's a joint lock on the elbow that can be performed in a controlled manner, so there is nothing to make it illegal. It's legal. I don't recall whether I have seen this ...


4

There was a machine at a gym I used to go that was inadvertently an armbar exerciser. It started you out on your side, with your body in a "crunch" position, and you moved to straighten out your back, just using your core muscles, resisting against a weight that wanted to keep you crunched up. Basically, this is the armbar movement, where you are crunched in ...


4

In the Takagi-ryū of classical jūjutsu this could be considered a variation of "Ōgyaku dori". Some variants include having the arm collapsed behind the back like in the presented image and GIF. While other versions keep the arm streight or only slightly bent in order to initiate an elbow lock or even a throw. Pretty much every tradition or practice will ...


4

For the 'Hug' in the 11th second, honestly, I dont see any controling, as the guy in front is still able to move and he is still able to deliver punches, headbutts (before he was grabbed by his throoat) even can hit the "controlers" groin with hand or knee. He even supports turning out of the hold while grabbing the throat as your first reflex would be to ...


4

While "reliably" may be disputable, the main means to make the bent-arm variant (from mune-gatame, i.e. not the classic kimura with uke's wrist behind her back, although the principles mostly apply) work on the elbow is torque: First, pull the arm (elbow and wrist) as close to yourself (uke's hip and shoulder respectively) as possible. This indeed is the "...


4

Yes, there is. Ude garami is a commonly misunderstood technique. Mainly because most people in western countries get taught that it has to be performed with uke's arm being bent. There is even a mistranslation in German where its called Armbeugehebel ("arm bend lever"), making this even more confusing. This is likely the case in other languages as well. In ...


3

Baratoplata and Kimura hurts the same joints and area Shoulder. It means both submissions are to same result but with different variations. In the same way of the Arm bar/arm lock. This submission hurts the elbow and could be apply for guard, mount, back, inverse and also from inside the my opponent guard (not usual) The history of Kimura: The kimura ...


3

Those in the video are very close to the techniques I learn. It's actually very easy to get out of any one of the techniques. The difficulty comes when the person performing the wrist lock/arm lock starts to switch technique to adapt to your attempts to escape. For example take the technique at 0.23. This is supposed to be a bent arm technique, but the ...


3

I'm sure the grapplers will have a lot of great counters. Here's a few that immediately come to mind, going from late counter to early counter: If you have the shoulder flexibility that your wrist has to go fairly far up your back, then one option is to drop a bit and drive your elbow of your free arm downward into the person trying to lock you up from ...


3

In Judo texts which use "elbow lock" to refer to bent-arm locks, the term "shoulder lock" appears in two contexts: kata-gatame ("shoulder hold", osaekomi-waza)1 2 3 kata-ha-jime ("single wing choke", shime-waza)4 Here, "lock" appears to be a translation of "katame" - i.e. while these "lock&...


3

I will answer as best I can, but I expect more experienced referees may disagree. This is an example of when the Kodokan classification is not very useful given the very different applications it covers. First the Kodokan video: Legal. This is a straightforward hyperextension armlock with tori's arm as the fulcrum. Unsure. I am not familiar with this ...


3

While these are not technically ude-garami according to Kodokan classification (since they do not use a figure-four grip), similar techniques in Judo can be applied to cause pain to a bent elbow-joint more directly than the kata forms of ude-garami.1 The mechanics of these kansetsu-waza is to "lock" the upper arm in a fixed position against your own body (...


2

I think you have mostly answered your own question. Ude-garami can affect both the shoulder and the elbow joint. As an official, it is not possible to tell whether the shoulder is being affected. All you can tell is that a nominally legal technique is being applied, and uke either taps or they do not. The same technique motion applied to a different uke ...


1

Syd Hoare (8th Dan) in a lecture given to the EJU Foundation Degree Course at Bath University in Aug 2005 said the following with respect to his research on the inclusion of wrist locks in early judo: Let us now look at the new 13 Article Butokukai Jujitsu Competition Rules which were completed in 1899: ... The nage-waza included sutemiwaza ...


1

As always, it depends on the rule set your training is targeting; but with that being said...the bicep slicer is legal accoring to the current IJF, and Free-Style Judo competition rule-sets.


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