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49

Studies Where We Choked People Unconscious In a Lab Being choked unconscious might not be good. (And we must keep in mind the vast difference between being "choked out" to the point of tapping and being choked unconscious.) But we have very little evidence that shows that it's bad to any significant degree, and considerable evidence that being choked all ...


34

There are two types of choke: Blood Choke: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) chokes involve restricting the flow of blood to the brain, thereby denying it of oxygen. Strangle: Windpipe (Air) chokes involve compressing the trachea which deny the entire body of air. This shouldn't be done in training to the point of unconsciousness as it can cause tissue damage and ...


26

I'm 15 and would like to start martial arts when I turn 16. I want a year to get myself in to really good shape before I start. This is a terrible plan. Find a gym and start training judo now. Find a proven strength program and start following it at the same time. Putting things off a year, most of the time, just means you're choosing not to do it. In the ...


24

and I expected him either to break free or to tap out. When I looked down at him... There would have been a physical sign that your instructor had lost consciousness, like his muscles relaxing and possibly a slight change in posture. You need to be considerably more aware than you were. You cannot always rely on your training partner to know when to tap out,...


20

There are two types of chokes: a blood choke, in which blood flow to the brain is, at least temporarily, halted; and an air choke, in which compression to the trachea or chest stop airflow into the body, and thus oxygenation of the blood. Both are inherently dangerous. During an air choke, excessive pressure can lead to the collapsing of the trachea or ...


20

Worth making the distinction between a blood choke and a air choke. ie, are you cutting off the air ( through the throat) or the blood (through the arteries). Throat choking is a lot more dangerous because of the damage you can do to the actual throat. Can cause swelling, etc and can cause people to die some time later. Blood chokes, less dangerous, ...


20

What makes a 10th dan? While judo 10th dans are all supremely skilled at judo, the difference between a 10th dan and a 6th dan is not technique nor judo skill, but rather contribution to the art. Consider these excerpts from a list of profiles of judan-ranked judoka: He was unbelievably energetic and eventually stood at the head of the Kodokan's ...


17

It is, and it takes a LONG time to reach. If you ever reach your 9th Dan, you are awarded a red belt to wear. The white-red belt is awarded at 6th Dan. At this stage, you need to wait for 8 to 10 years between each test, and it's not automatically given to you; the federation will only give the highest Dan to people who actually have an impact on judo as a ...


15

A good way to get gi / kimono specific grip training is sling your gi / kimono top around a pull up bar or a tree branch and use that to do any number of exercises, such as Pull ups, grip the lapels and hoist yourself up Grab lapels and pull yourself up Grab lapels and bring your lower body up and wrap your legs around the gi in triangle position Just hang ...


15

Have you considered an MMA ground and pound dummy or a wrestling throw dummy? There are several types out there and not all of the work. I would consider looking for one with full length arms and is sturdy enough to nearly stand on it's own. Some examples: Throw Dummy: Ground and Pound: Personally I think the throw dummy would work better than the ...


15

My experiences in judo and BJJ The judo club I trained at regularly for several years was about 50/50 between newaza and tachiwaza (groundwork and throws). (Actually, it was more like 43/47/10 with the 10% being kata and standing joint locks.) My time at other judo schools has showed the ratio to be fairly different: 75/25 in favor of throwing, or even 90/...


14

The relationships between judo, Kosen judo, various traditional Japanese jujutsu ryu, groundwork (newaza), the nature of challenge matches during that period in Japan, and pinning a style on a given grappling expert during that period in Japan are all very complicated and deeply interconnected. In my view, if we are to develop an understanding of this ...


14

Nearly all forms of aikido are predicated on avoiding any possibility of pressure-testing their skills against resisting opponents in free-sparring or competitive environments. Nearly all practitioners stick to demonstration and practice with cooperative partners. From this it naturally follows that few aikidoka will be caught on camera trying to apply their ...


14

Toxic people Yes, there are toxic people in the martial arts world. Martial artists are human, and although martial training can improve character, martial artists are just as capable at being terrible people as any other person. Feeling like you suck It's perfectly normal to feel like you suck. This is after all, why you go to class; you are trying to ...


13

As a former LAPD police man who went through academy training in the early 70s, I can give testimony about the bar arm control hold and its effects, on other police cadets and myself as well. We were taught to know what to do when gaining consciousness, how to identify by hearing, where our main threat was (man with a gun) and how to proceed. Naturally in ...


13

Rulesets determine skillsets. Tactics are determined by the "battleground" (read: competition setup). If a style focuses on competition that doesn't allow foot-sweeps or clinching, and kicks are scored higher and more frequently than face punching, your fighters will end up looking like Olympic TKD: hands at the sides to deflect body kicks, facing sideways ...


13

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


13

From my own experience, a match between judo/aikido starts at a distance doing Aikido and as soon as the distance closes, switching to judo. I have no link to videos as I never bothered filming any. However, this is what Tomiki found when he started to introduce Judo randori style play into Aikido: his students (who all knew some Judo) would automatically ...


12

I had this exact problem, at the same point in my progress at judo. Things that didn't work for me I tried doing uchikomi slowly and deliberately. This usually ended up with me hunched over in a full squat, unbalanced, unable to stand back up with the throw, without any kuzushi applied to my uke. I tried uchikomi for speed, whipping into each rep. Doing ...


12

What style of TKD? ITF, WTF, ATA, STF, etc? I would suspect that they are probably WTF, and their bounce has to do with the style of sparring that they train for. TKD sparrers in general use their feet a lot, and there is a lot of switch stance, spins, aerial kicks, things of that nature, so the requirement is to be light on your feet. Watch any WTF or ...


12

Judo's groundwork (newaza) looks strange to someone from a Brazilian jiujitsu, wrestling, or SAMBO background. Its approach is fairly unique to this particular combat sport. Why? Because rule-sets determine tactics. The basics of judo newaza Other than throwing the opponent, one can win in judo by pins, arm-locks that attack the elbow, and chokes. Some ...


12

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


12

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


12

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


12

Great question and likely one which needs to be asked again and again. One short answer might be: Judoka may execute throws in tactical (street) situations against assailants with clothing. A longer answer might be: Clothing is a tool in the hands of a martial artist; as my students have practiced with judogi, street clothes and various levels of attire. ...


12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


12

According to forensic science it is pressure applied to the carotids and not the veins that causes loss of consciousness, although pressure on the veins leaves specific signs of strangulation when they bust, but are not a cause of death or unconsciousness. (pg. 297, 14.2 Strangulation, see section #2 re: carotid compression). Although the deeper carotid ...


11

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


11

Wrestling and kyokushin karate go together fine. Most martial arts that cover different disciplines (e.g. striking/wrestling, or punching/kicking) work fine together because they complement each other. Arts that cover the same discipline, like Tae Kwon Do and Muay Thai, or wrestling and judo, can be confusing to combine if both arts are new to the trainee. ...


11

Martial arts are a journey on your own path, at your own time and speed. I have (or have had) a number of students with wide ranging issues with co-ordination, flexibility and movement. As an instructor it is very important for me to take these things into consideration when running the class - perhaps demonstrating things more slowly - or giving alternate ...


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