Hot answers tagged

26

I'm 15 and would like to start martial arts when I turn 16. I want a year to get myself in to really good shape before I start. This is a terrible plan. Find a gym and start training judo now. Find a proven strength program and start following it at the same time. Putting things off a year, most of the time, just means you're choosing not to do it. In the ...


20

What makes a 10th dan? While judo 10th dans are all supremely skilled at judo, the difference between a 10th dan and a 6th dan is not technique nor judo skill, but rather contribution to the art. Consider these excerpts from a list of profiles of judan-ranked judoka: He was unbelievably energetic and eventually stood at the head of the Kodokan's instructors....


18

It is, and it takes a LONG time to reach. If you ever reach your 9th Dan, you are awarded a red belt to wear. The white-red belt is awarded at 6th Dan. At this stage, you need to wait for 8 to 10 years between each test, and it's not automatically given to you; the federation will only give the highest Dan to people who actually have an impact on judo as a ...


15

My experiences in judo and BJJ The judo club I trained at regularly for several years was about 50/50 between newaza and tachiwaza (groundwork and throws). (Actually, it was more like 43/47/10 with the 10% being kata and standing joint locks.) My time at other judo schools has showed the ratio to be fairly different: 75/25 in favor of throwing, or even 90/...


14

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


14

From my own experience, a match between judo/aikido starts at a distance doing Aikido and as soon as the distance closes, switching to judo. I have no link to videos as I never bothered filming any. However, this is what Tomiki found when he started to introduce Judo randori style play into Aikido: his students (who all knew some Judo) would automatically ...


14

Nearly all forms of aikido are predicated on avoiding any possibility of pressure-testing their skills against resisting opponents in free-sparring or competitive environments. Nearly all practitioners stick to demonstration and practice with cooperative partners. From this it naturally follows that few aikidoka will be caught on camera trying to apply their ...


14

Toxic people Yes, there are toxic people in the martial arts world. Martial artists are human, and although martial training can improve character, martial artists are just as capable at being terrible people as any other person. Feeling like you suck It's perfectly normal to feel like you suck. This is after all, why you go to class; you are trying to ...


14

There are non-Newtonian fluids that get harder when stressed (like cornflour and water), and there are others that get softer when stressed (like tomato ketchup, that acts solid until you apply stress by shaking it when it turns liquid and runny). There may be potential in filling a judo mat with the latter type of fluid, in that it will be a hard and solid ...


12

Disclaimer: I am a judo ikkyu who prefers osotogari but doesn't have an osotoguruma to speak of. I will be using the opinions of more knowledgable judoka to inform this answer. Judo throws are named and grouped by their telltale action. That is, the names are a pedagogical tool to delineate the various body mechanics one can use to throw an opponent. That's ...


12

Anecdotally, Judo can be absolutely brutal on your body: After years of dedication to judo it gave me a black belt (first dan) and unparalleled skills at taking anyone down. It also gave me: 1) Osteoartheritis on all my fingers from GI gripping 2) Pinched nerve in my neck 3) Bad lower back from not wanting to fall on my back and lose by ...


12

Oh man... I help teach (and teach if the head instructor is gone) a small group of kids every week and this has always been major question for me. Not specifically this, but just how to get the kids to want to learn Aikido at all! Also, I just want to mention that to me (I could absolutely be wrong, but it's the way I learned it), 'ukemi' means all ...


12

Great question and likely one which needs to be asked again and again. One short answer might be: Judoka may execute throws in tactical (street) situations against assailants with clothing. A longer answer might be: Clothing is a tool in the hands of a martial artist; as my students have practiced with judogi, street clothes and various levels of attire. ...


12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


12

According to forensic science it is pressure applied to the carotids and not the veins that causes loss of consciousness, although pressure on the veins leaves specific signs of strangulation when they bust, but are not a cause of death or unconsciousness. (pg. 297, 14.2 Strangulation, see section #2 re: carotid compression). Although the deeper carotid ...


12

In Japanese, some6 initial consonants become voiced when they occur internal to some5 compound words, e.g: (unvoiced) (voiced) kimono judo-gi koshi-guruma o-goshi katame-waza kesa-gatame shime-waza hadaka-jime tori kata-ashi-dori hon-kesa-gatamae ippon hasami-jime kani-basami This process is called rendaku, and the conditions under which it applies ...


12

You do not purposefully give your back. You do not "give" anything. Applied correctly, your back is safe. There are some misconceptions here. You do not simply "give your back". Throwing is something you should only do when you are in control of your own and your opponent's balance. It is fast, it is powerful, and it may well break your opponent's hip when ...


11

Consequences of doing judo long-term: You probably get better at judo. So, greater ability to throw, choke, pin, and armlock people and to avoid same being done to oneself. Increase in physical capabilities, such as greater strength, agility, cardio, toughness, and so on. (Note: this is improved, not harmed, by being thrown to the ground repeatedly. Taking ...


11

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


11

I've trained in many martial arts schools. There have always been one or two individuals that didn't know their own strength or who simply had some kind of mental issue that caused them to scare everyone else in the class who had the misfortune of partnering up with them. And I'm not even talking about sparring. It could be a nice, smooth, flowing, ...


11

Wrestling and kyokushin karate go together fine. Most martial arts that cover different disciplines (e.g. striking/wrestling, or punching/kicking) work fine together because they complement each other. Arts that cover the same discipline, like Tae Kwon Do and Muay Thai, or wrestling and judo, can be confusing to combine if both arts are new to the trainee. ...


11

Martial arts are a journey on your own path, at your own time and speed. I have (or have had) a number of students with wide ranging issues with co-ordination, flexibility and movement. As an instructor it is very important for me to take these things into consideration when running the class - perhaps demonstrating things more slowly - or giving alternate ...


11

Generally the way to become a good instructor is experience. Instruct at your club whenever you have the opportunity - get better at dealing with students and explaining things in a way that they understand - watch your instructor teach, how do they make it simpler for those that are struggling etc. (or maybe - how would you explain/demonstrate it ...


10

That's barely a modification of kesagatame. There's no gi, so he uses a slightly different grip. It totally counts. Just about all techniques, including pins, are modified in actual application. This is so true that the examples of throws that don't look obviously modified are shared as highlights and widely touted as beautiful paragons of the art. But a ...


10

I assume you are working on the arm bar known in judo as juji gatame. The principle in this technique is the use of a class 2 lever to hyperextend the opponent's elbow joint. Resistance is in the middle, at the opponent's elbow joint. Force is applied by pulling down at the wrist and raising the hips. The fulcrum should be one of your legs; this makes any ...


10

If there's a lack of progress during ground work in a judo match, the referee will stand the competitors up. This is intended to encourage action, rapid attack, and prevent stalemate positions.


10

You're describing the knee push variation of "Scissor Sweep." It's very common in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. There are two main ways to do it from full guard. Both involve getting control of one arm in either double wrist control, or arm drag position. For the sake of this example we'll say you have their right arm. Method 1: Classic Scissor Sweep While keeping ...


10

There are two primary muscle groups at work. The ones which control the 2 larger fingers, the 1st and 2nd phalanges (thumb and index) are controlled with the larger thenar muscles, called the flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, and opponens pollicis muscles - collectively, I'll call them the thenar muscles. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th phalanges (...


10

Judo competition is not graded on the name of the technique you do. It's graded on whether you throw the opponent on their back, pin them, strangle them, put them in an armlock, or break the rules. So yes, you can use improvised or "unnamed" throws, or non-standard pins and so on, as long as it's not specifically forbidden. But if you've never ...


9

I would like to provide the correct answer and ask you to discard the chosen answer completely. It's already a bit late to do that, but maybe it's not too late. Reason for the correction: In Judo, you DO NOT, in any way, need the muscle to CARRY your opponent, because you simply NEVER carry your opponent in Judo in any way. This excludes being mounted on ...


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