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10

Judo competition is not graded on the name of the technique you do. It's graded on whether you throw the opponent on their back, pin them, strangle them, put them in an armlock, or break the rules. So yes, you can use improvised or "unnamed" throws, or non-standard pins and so on, as long as it's not specifically forbidden. But if you've never ...


8

This looks like a kouchi-makikomi. In this video's variation, tori is first entering for a sode-tsurikomi-goshi, and tori's head ends up in a similar position to a front headlock. There is no requirement that uke have a front headlock hold for the throw to be classified as a kouchi-makikomi. The key classification elements to a kouchi-makikomi are: reaping ...


6

Usefulness of "dangerous" moves why haven't we seen more people landing badly (or purposefully) on legs and breaking them? Because it's actually really hard to cause damage with these moves, and a lot of that is just luck. They're banned because a small but significant percentage of attempts will, due to a the opponent's split-section reaction ...


6

There is a judo version of this question about the difference between a sensei (mentor) and coach (cornerman). The United States Judo Federation has a long answer to this question that considers the cultural history and etymology of these words, what functions they perform, and how the roles may overlap, but basically comes to the conclusion that the ...


5

Throwing someone is difficult and depends on particular openings, balance, and grips; staying standing is the easier "default". In contrast, pins are the opposite: the escape is difficult and depends on particular openings, weight distributions, and grips; staying on top of someone who has already been pinned is the easier default. Standing ...


4

Judo has always used mats. In Judo Memoirs of Jigoro Kano, Kano (the founder of judo), measured practice spaces by the number of tatami mats. The warehouse afforded a practice area of only ten tamami mats, and there were square pillars here and there. The primary protection against injuries is technique and cooperation, not mats. The beginning lessons of ...


4

The Kodokan curriculum is not purely focused on sport competition, but modern practitioners frequently ignore non-sport elements. The Kodokan Judo curriculum includes basics, techniques, and kata. These are internationally standardized, and rank is determined based on evaluation of these skills. Everyone studies basics and techniques. Competitors frequently ...


4

From the Judo Chop Suey Podcast, Episode 26: Interview with Christopher Round at ~49:18, the interviewee Christopher Round, a former US Olympic hopeful, addresses this point while discussing where he reached his competitive ceiling: I started running into players who were ambidextrous. And it's very rare for a player to be very good who is ambidextrous...[...


4

Contact sports involve risk of injury. This is more true for people who are weak. This is more true for grappling combat sports, where the explicit goal is to move the other person in a way they don't want to be moved. Both thrower and throwee need to take care to avoid injury. Neck-grip throws include snap-downs from the front headlock or tie-up, chest lock ...


4

NHK has video examples of sumo's kimarite here. Main differences In judo the aim of throws is to put the opponent flat on their back, with control and speed. In sumo however, the aim is to have any part of the opponent's body touch the ground / step out of the contest bounds. As such: throws forcing the opponent to fall forwards lifting/pushing/slapping/...


4

Gripping daintily with only a few fingers is a drill my judo coach utilized to de-emphasize straight-arming and other gripping strategies as a defensive tactic, so one could focus on evasive footwork and hip blocks instead. Another contributing idea is that a tense grip encourages static, in-place judo, because one tries to control the opponent (through ...


3

Sewing machines won't work for sewing patches on your gi. I use a straight running stitch (basting) starting with the knot coming through the back of the material. That way, your thread stays inside the outer ridge of the patch. Or you can use the overlap stitch (overcast) to keep the patch from curling and pulling away from your gi when you wash it. You ...


3

First, I practice judo and not BJJ, so understand what I can and cannot answer with knowledge and where my potential biases may be. Second, this is a common way to start an internet flame war. With that in mind, I will still try to answer this objectively. So is Judo better for self-defense while BJJ is better for a controlled sports-setting? No. ...


3

Judo throws are HARD to do! You cannot dabble in them. It takes a lot time and patience to develop functional throwing technique. Wrestling is easier to pick up in a shorter amount of time. It's also not good for aging players. Judo is a lifetime sport where your throws can get better with age. I've seen 60 year old folks with amazing throws. If you want ...


3

In Judo, the basic throw with the arm around the neck is normally called koshi guruma, which translates to hip wheel. This is basically equivalent to a headlock throw in wrestling. In your kubi nage video, the instructor calls kubi nage a cross between tai otoshi and koshi guruma. The judo pedant in me would simply call the demonstrated throw a koshi guruma. ...


3

Did [Kayla Harrison] focus on learning BJJ [as she pivoted to MMA], or stick more with and Judo and Japanese Jujitsu? Neither. As far as I can tell she took the correct approach and switched to wrestling-for-MMA and how to specifically adapt her judo to gloved, caged, no-gi situations. You can tell because her MMA strategy demonstrates specific techniques ...


3

In the YouTube comments, someone points out Commenter "Gerijima" below says in japanese that the technique is called "itotoushi" (phonetically: ee-TOW TOW-oo-she) which in japanese means "thread pass through" as in the action of threading a needle. And he says this technique is in Shinya Aoki's book. Discussed a little further ...


2

A throw that encircles the neck would likely be koshi guruma, but for me, I've found it is more unsafe when performed in uchikomi, rather than nagekomi (throwing). I had whiplash from someone doing the uchikomi part of koshi Guruma, as they had no idea what they were going & whacked me hard around the neck & head, my neck made popping noises & I ...


2

The questions asks which martial art to start with if the focus is on self-defense: Boxing, Taekwondo, or Judo. Well first, I'd like you to read what I wrote in my answer at the following link: why a perfect expert and trained taekwondo player or martial artist fear fights? Read that answer and read the links that it also listed. You might also want to look ...


2

I found that my club actually does not have an official status. The initial teacher who once had all black belts required to start the club is now retired. One of the remaining teachers in the team has the black belt first dan and another only has brown. Still, both black and brown belts have been earned in officially recognized clubs by these teachers. ...


2

Just to add to mattm's answer - the IJF has now codified its position in the current ruleset: So in short, the following submissions are/aren't legal: ✅ Anaconda ✅ Kata-gatame ✅ D'arce / Ungvari / Japanese necktie ❌ Peruvian necktie ❌ Standing arm triangles


2

I have only been taught one throw in BJJ, and it wasn't really effective. Let's be careful with our language. It's not that the throw was ineffective, but that you are ineffective at the technique so far. Expect to take at least a year of regular clinch practice, more likely three, for your stand-up grappling to get good enough to execute throws reliably. ...


2

Spend time wisely First, a general note is important. The strategic problem with judo throws for BJJ is that they require a major time investment to learn, and the payoff in BJJ competition is low. According to the BJJ rules, you can drop right to the ground and avoid situations where throwing is practical. With that in mind, we'll look at your three ...


2

I assume that you refer to the technique where you pull uke's lapel under his armpit, diagonally across their upper back and around their neck. The rule says clearly that we are not supposed to apply the choke with the belt or bottom of the jacket, which is different from using them. The essential thing here is how far around uke's neck you go: if you grab ...


2

I would classify it as a variant of kosoto-gari, kosoto-gake, or de-ashi-barai, depending on the particulars. Teaching it as "the sticker" rather than one of those looks like a valid choice. I wouldn't worry too much about which bucket it goes in. Judo's taxonomy of techniques is a pedagogical framework with clear distinctions imposed onto the reality of a ...


2

Timing v. structure (deashi-harai v. kosoto-gari) I would guess that the 'sticker' label is applied to a throw where tori's leg/foot starts in contact with uke's leg, but I think these variations would not be classified as the same Kodokan technique. The key distinguishing feature between a kosoto-gari and a deashi-harai is whether uke has weight on the leg ...


1

Mentors talk about the question. Cornermen answer the question and solve the problem. Thank you for making that so clear. I prefer a cornerman.


1

In judo the application of the techniques is done with a preponderance of one limb. That is clear. The classification of the techniques accounts for that. So there are groups of main activity of applying fulcrums like: Te waza, Ashi waza, koshi waza or after the direction of falls: sutemi waza, uki waza, makikomi waza


1

Yes some tehnique like the uchi mata is the same for judo and sumo.


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