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15

"Ju-jutsu" and "jiu-jitsu" are different romanizations of the same Japanese word(s) 柔術. This is analogous to how we have both "Qur'an" and "Koran" from the Arabic الْقُرْآن‎. 柔術 was historically spelled with hiragana1 2 like so: じうじゆつ Individually these characters are transliterated:3 じ う じ ゆ つ ji u ji yu tsu but ...


15

Earliest examples of wrestling Wrestling has been a part of most societies since time-immemorial: Fresco in tomb 15 at Beni Hasan, Egypt ca. 2,000 BC. The earliest known historical European descriptions of wrestling techniques are from classical antiquity: Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 466 (c. 200 CE, Greece). And the earliest known manuals are from Chinese classics: ...


14

There is nothing wrong with what your son is doing! He is doing all the right things at the right time: he is gentle so his uke will train with him again. Gentleness might be because your son does not want to feel like he is acting like a bully. His moves are fine so that he is learning to do them reflexively. Remember repetition makes permanence. This ...


12

There is a famous zen story, one of the variation is this… Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912), received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen. Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, and then kept on pouring. The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. “It is ...


11

You might never get into a fight, but you will fall down several times in your life. Aside from that, if you're working in an art or practice that's going to have a lot of throwing, you need to learn breakfalls early just so you can get to the meat of your training. Avoiding breaking your wrist or collarbone is something you don't want to have to learn the ...


10

The person is perfectly correct, except with the last sentence. I guess this is a semantical problem. You can say "X branched off from/of Y", which says X is a descendant of Y, or "X branched away from Y", which just means they share roots and developed in different directions. Steve said the latter (common root: classical Kodokan Judo, ...


9

Rules are part of the sport aspect of martial arts. These are generally safety related for competition, although there may be other origins as well. Many of these rules make no sense in a real fighting situation. For example: Judo - you can't hit people Tae kwon do - you can't throw people Boxing - you can't hit people from behind, kick people, or push on ...


9

Break falling is a way to safely escape a technique that could impart serious harm to the receiver. It is self defence at its most basic form. For obvious reasons, without it, one cannot practice Aikido safely. Thus, it is one of the first thing student should learn to do well. In no order, the purposes of ukemi are: Safely escape technique. Help the ...


9

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


9

Judo's initial innovations were not in techniques, but in the manner of training them. Randori Kano emphasized the use of randori (free practice) in training. This contrasted with many jujutsu schools that focused on kata, or prearranged exercises. The tradeoff is that more dangerous techniques such as striking were removed from randori; these remain in ...


8

I've learned both methods in judo, BJJ, and karate. Tucking the bottom leg makes for smoother rolls and stand-ups after the fall, but makes little sense if one cannot roll and is just trying to best take the impact. It is also suboptimal for rolling if one's opponent is still latched on. Keeping the bottom leg mostly straight is good for stopping the ...


8

What you are experiencing is normal. You are trying to learn new skills and movements and are clearly getting overwhelmed by it. There are a few things you can do: Take it slowly, as slowly as you can manage. It takes time for your brain to control your body to teach it new movement. Let that process take its time. Do not try to do techniques at lighting ...


8

I'm sure with your jujitsu you've seen enough of how a dojo should be to judge when someone's acting improperly, though from the little you've detailed it's not clear whether he's potentially just socially inept (trying to offer encouragement or some sense of empathy with the difficulties of stretching as an adult), and junior enough in the martial arts to ...


7

Git gud 😁 To paraphrase the "train like you fight, fight like you train" mantra, you need to train in conditions worst (or better, depending on your point of view) than those in your gradings: So with pressure and fatigue both mental and physical. The best way to do this is demonstrations at the end of a class. You get up, demonstrates something from the ...


7

Kano's memoirs describe his jujutsu training. Tenjin Shinyo Ryu under Hachinosuke Fukuda and Masatomo Iso Kito Ryu under Tsunetoshi Iikubo the Kito style was very different from the Tenjin Shinyo style jujutsu to which I had by then become well-accustomed. In Tenjin Shinyo, there are a range of strangulation techniques and groundwork hold-downs. On the ...


6

According to this dentist, the recommendation by the American Association of Orthodontists is that anyone with braces should wear a mouth guard whenever doing a sport, including boxing, wrestling, and martial arts: http://www.gechofforthodontics.com/mouthguards I would assume this recommendation is for "all the time" during practice, not just for sparring. ...


6

In the text, he explains the origin of this term. And he points out that it's his word, not something the Japanese would say: When I commenced to teach jujitsu in Yokohama, Japan, in every trick I showed how to use the lower abdomen, and how to maneuver opponent's balance. My first pupils were Japanese friends, and lower abdomen to them was shita ...


6

A calf slicer is a compression lock that crushes the calf muscle, and I've heard the terms "calf crush", "calf slicer", and "calf crank" all used interchangeably. At 2:00 of this video, Eddie Bravo describes the Vaporizer as a "toe hold slash calf crank, slash devastation...this one is very hard to resist." (Emphasis mine.) So there's an element of calf ...


6

According to Wikipedia, it was introduced to the UK by Edward William Barton-Wright in 1898.


6

I'm with Sardathrion that martial arts are a small part of self defense, and one that we seldom actually use these days, so your child is not necessarily missing out on anything by practicing the movements as more of an intellectual exercise. That said, you might consider appealing to him about ensuring that his uke is getting a good experience. Learning ...


6

Kano created a hybrid martial art from existing jujutsu in Japan and named his hybrid judo. What made judo novel was not the introduction of new techniques, but the manner of training them. The critical elements according to Kano are: randori (free practice): This is non-prearranged live practice against resisting opponents, in contrast to kata-style ...


6

Cycling will initially improve your general fitness, (especially stamina, general cardiovascular). After a while you will reach a general plateau of improved fitness (unless you keep increasing the cycling distance/intensity). The issues for martial arts fitness is that cycling only uses certain groups of movements for a repetitive action. So while you may ...


6

Your instructor should have noticed this and be taking steps to mitigate his aggression and lack of respect. Respect is a cornerstone of the martial arts. Not everyone has it and not everyone learns it, so you will invariably encounter people of this nature. It is especially prevalent in lower grades - usually respect is learned (and gained) the longer ...


5

Apart from your own answer of safety, another practical effect is that a lot of damage in a fight isn't so much from the opponent as from the environment. Whether it's being thrown to the ground, being tripped, getting knocked back by a blow into a wall, or misstepping and running into an obstacle, that's all damage being done to you which is relatively risk-...


5

For a judo perspective on falling technique (ukemi), the best place to start is the formal throwing techniques (nage-no-kata), where the most emphasis is placed on falling details. For forward rolling falls (zempo kaiten), there are two basic possibilities: You cannot roll and stand up, as in the nage-no-kata fall for tsurikomi goshi. You may be ...


5

Rickson Gracie escapes this pick-up by pre-emptively jumping for an arm-in guillotine choke grip rather than waiting for his opponent to initiate the throw, then hip switching, then drawing on raw elite athleticism, and finally by his opponent failing to secure any grip for a true double-leg, suplex, or anything other orthodox technique Rickson doesn't use ...


5

You're looking for a way to connect your karate with jujitsu. There actually is a very deep connection, one which you might not be aware of. All of karate kata are based on classical jujitsu. I spend a good amount of time explaining this at the answer here: Why is more time dedicated to exercises and very less for sparring? Is it for the fee? That answer ...


5

Classical jujitsu (such as Danzan Ryu) is an encyclopedia of techniques for grappling, striking, and weapons. How it is trained is typically by memorizing kata and performing it with a partner. Each kata is done in some formal, concrete way. That's usually thought of as the "demo" version of the technique. It usually doesn't work very well in most situations....


5

Re-calibrate your expectations. Nobody invented throwing. Wrestling is pre-human. Mammals wrestle as both bonding and male-dominance-hierarchy behavior. Monkeys wrestle. Lions wrestle. The codification of wrestling and throwing is human, but still pre-historic. From the indigenous wrestling cultures that still exist we can infer that prehistoric people ...


5

If you think of martial arts as a tree, we have Judo(old) with descendants Judo(today) and BJJ(today). The other person is saying that Judo(today) is not the same as Judo(old). The groundwork in Judo(old) looks more like the groundwork in BJJ(today) because Judo(today) has changed. You seem to be focused on the precise wording, which could be improved ...


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