8

Is there a way to escape/ defend yourself from tornado kick? Ummm... yes. If there wasn't, all martial arts would only practice tornado kicks, but in fact relatively few martial arts use the technique. Those kicks are horribly telegraphed, which means the defender have a lot of warning and time to decide what to do to defend or counter-attack. They're ...


6

The setup for one of these kicks is ridiculous, and I question if there is even a significant power difference between one and a well delivered roundhouse or side kick. I feel good footwork is the best defense, since anything except a stationary target is going to foil the effectiveness of execution. I'm a big, aggressive fighter, and I always step inside ...


5

Lots of people fight full contact (muay thai, kickboxing, and full-contact karate systems like kyokushin) for years and take blows like this regularly - if the guys got up at the time and seemed ok, the chances that your blows had any significant long-term effect is incredibly small. That one of the guys was still standing suggests you didn't get a ...


5

The 540 kick causes a lot of problems for people who are confident with the 360. This is often due to starting with the opposite leg forward to the 360. As backwards as it may sound - practice the 180 kick: this will get you more used to jumping with the kicking leg at the back. Progress that to a 360 reverse turning kick with the opposite leg. This will ...


5

Yes, it's a good move First off, yes, this can be a good move for TKD sparring. It's fast, covers distance, and it's very visible (important if you don't have the money for sensors and rely on judges). But there are sacrifices As one of my fellow Capoeira students keeps re-iterating, the moment you leave the ground, you lose control. There's very little you ...


4

I'm over 40 and train in taekwondo; I've never been advised not to do jumps or jumping kicks! I train with a gentleman who doesn't jump (for patterns or sparring), but he is nearly 80 and has arthritis! That's not to say my knees don't hurt at times. Some years ago, I had a problem with my knee called chondromalacia patella, which is caused by an imbalance ...


4

The dreaded jumping kicks, here are some tips from my own experience and teaching club members: Look after yourself first. If you feel any pain in practice STOP, take the necessary rest and doctor/physio advice before continuing. Protect your joints - If you can get access to a softly sprung floor (like what is used for beginner gymnastics or freerunning ...


4

When using kicks I will suggest you Capoeira. It has a lot of kicks of any kinds, acrobatic kicks and acrobatic moves. See some videos here. But inside a martial art you can practice more the moves you want.


4

If you feel like there is a greater chance of injury for 540 degree kicks over 360 degree kicks, that's good, because there is a greater chance of injury. If you want to develop techniques like a 540 degree spin kick, you have to understand this is a fact of life. The physics of rotation is a good place to start. Your moment of inertia is your resistance ...


3

Here are a small list of styles to look into. They're all hand dominated and have forms: Wing Chun kung-fu Southern Praying Mantis kung-fu Hung Gar kung-fu Pentjak Silat Taiji (Tai Chi) Many other styles would qualify. For example, I listed a few southern styles of kung-fu up there. There are a lot more southern styles than that. And they do tend to be ...


3

I don't think Tai Chi has many of these. It does have a few low knee bends but even these seem to be comparatively rare. It is also very form based.


3

Advantages You've guessed part of the equation. They are shocking to anyone who you manage to pull one off on. In addition, if the jump is going forward, you add all of your forward weight and momentum to the kick. Jumps also allow you to reach higher targets than you might be able to reach standing. Disadvantages Jump kicks telegraph quite a bit, ...


3

To flesh out Sardathrion's answer, there isn't a martial art where you will find it as a serious maneuver used in a fight. Jumping kicks in general are risky business, since you are surrendering a great deal of control by leaving the ground, and actually hitting your opponent will bleed off a great deal of momentum, which is hazardous when you're inverting ...


3

I have no experience with elastic bands - so hopefully someone else will pick up on those. I have tried Knee braces - but they often restrict the jump motion and the less restrictive ones are more prone to moving and less useful in protecting the knees. So my tips for practicing those jumps are as follows Find a sprung floor - this will allow you to ...


3

Enroll in an adult gymnastics class. While you can ask them to start with the back and front flips, they'll usually have you start with more basic things and will allow you to make gradual progress towards your flips over time. And they'll teach you good form with an emphasis on safety. Safety is key, and so is being able to teach it to different people. In ...


2

The easiest solution would be to find an adult-friendly gymnastics, parkour, street dancing, or cheerleading class. They should already have the curriculum and equipment to teach you to safely perform forward and back flips. Alternately, there are many instructional resources on the internet. Google + Parkour Backflip Tutorial = How To BACK FLIP - Free ...


2

On one hand, you do not get any more points for a jumping kick than you do for any other kind of kick. However, there are times when a jump is better than a standard kick, you just have to be good at not telegraphing your intentions. The side kick is a good example. Assuming you decided to throw the side kick instead of any other, then you want to kick ...


2

There are a few reasons why jumping can be bad. Once you leave the floor you are a passenger; you can't change direction until you have landed. If your opponent is wise to it, they know exactly where you are going, allowing for a side step and counter. This can make the attacker look quite foolish (I love jumping and had this happen to me a lot when I was a ...


2

As Sean Duggan mentioned, I described pretty much the entire taxonomy of Taekwondo kicks here. It's long, but useful to read if you're a student of Taekwondo: How does one train for a spinning reverse kick? As for jumping kicks, you can perform these a number of ways. First is by themselves, just jumping straight up. In this case, you're not traveling. You'...


1

Land softly and work up For those with the patience, I advise starting from a soft landing and working up from there. When you land, you reduce the forces on your joints by decelerating over distance. Land starting with bent legs and decelerate as your legs bend more. This is similar to catching an egg; you give to prevent shatter upon impact. I normally ...


1

Some possibilities: Increased height - sometimes you have to kick higher than you can from a standing position. Ground evasion - If an opponent is striking low, a short hop may take you over that attack so that you can attack them. Avoidance of terrain - A short hop over an obstacle or broken terrain can be beneficial Startle effect - Many people freeze up ...


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