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7

It depends on the teacher, but generally the answer is no, it's not disrespectful. The best teachers I've ever known had no problems with students training under other teachers. Many, if not most, even encouraged it. That said, you should ask your instructor first before doing anything. Maybe phrase it like this: "Hey, I'm thinking of taking classes under ...


6

When I was doing Doce Pares Escrima several years ago, I ran into the same problem. I used cloth athletic/medical tape to cover up the blistered areas to give them a chance to heal and at one point, when I found that it was a particular part of the stick rubbing up against my hand (an area where the lacquer had gotten roughed up from impact, actually), I put ...


6

Blisters can happen initially. I think it happens to everyone new to stick fighting. It's nothing to be too worried about. It probably just means you were over-eager in your training and went too hard or too long. No big deal. It can also happen if you don't train regularly. Like if you just go once a week, your hand never gets used to it, so you get ...


3

I have heard the terms "yantok," "rattan," and "baston" used in Eskrima. "Yantok" is just the Tagalog word for rattan (the most common material for Filipino fighting sticks), while "baston" means "cane." So the words are simple descriptions; "stick" seems an analogous term in idiomatic English. There are at least two dozen languages spoken in the ...


3

They can be called 'kali sticks', 'arnis sticks', 'baston', etc. Just insert arnis style sticks is ok. Or even just 'arnis'. There's diff. styles of arnis and the term depends on which style you're referring too. There are also diff. material for the sticks themselves. People usually just get whatever you refer to :)


2

When I was doing Doce Pares escrima in California about 10 years ago, my instructor taught it to us as knife-hand strikes for 1-4, straight fist punches for 5-10, a hammer-fist blow for 11, and either a punch or a two-finger poke for 12. 7 and 8 were outliers in that the movement was different with it being a straight strike rather than a looping one. He ...


2

In my province in Cebu, located in central Philippines, we refer the arnis/kali/eskrima stick as "OLISI" or "GAROTE." All cebuano eskrimadors young and old alike (the old school) use the terms above. I hope this will satisfy your queries.


1

Filipinos without FMA knowledge usually call it "yantok" or "arnis" (with a stress on the "-tok"), but FMA practitioners would just call it arnis, yantok, stick, kali stick, baston, or (insert FMA style here) stick.


1

FMA terminology Baston is one name for stick. There are others. This Wikipedia Article states that Garrote (spanish meaning "club") is sometimes used.


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