Hot answers tagged

27

Everything that's physically challenging carries the chance of injury. Deal with it. Running risks joint degeneration. Bicycling can be bad for sexual function and mobility. Hikers get lost and freeze to death. Tennis causes elbow pain. Soccer players blow out their knees. Baseball players risk concussions from wayward pitches to the head. Lifting weights ...


24

Wing chun doesn't have to be bad for this school to be bad for you. It sounds like you're not comfortable there. I think you should stop training with these people.


19

Here are bits that we do know: Gichin Funakoshi, born and raised in Okinawa, is the man who opened the first official, public karate dojo, and he did so on the main island of Japan. Prior to that, it was mostly studied at night, in secret. This was due to Japanese occupation - making the carrying of weapons illegal. Like all resourceful people do, they ...


18

Your kyu rank is relative to the style (and dojo) that you practiced at when you were 15. Realistically, no matter what the style 9th kyu is barely more than beginner. I'd suggest you start again from white belt (whatever kyu that happens to be in the dojo you'll be attending). If you remember stuff then you should be able to advance fairly quickly. I've ...


17

First, about children's ranks vs. adult's ranks... Child black-belts are not uncommon in the world of Karate and Taekwondo. But when there are child black-belts, they are generally awarded that rank in the "children's" rankings. This rank is not generally the same as an adult black-belt. At least in most schools. In some schools, there's no distinction ...


16

This is a common reason people get into martial arts. You're probably going to hear a lot of people tell you that's not a good use of martial arts, out of some general sense of "violence is wrong" paternalism. What I will say, instead, is that not everyone's bullying situation is the same. One person might punch a bully in the nose and be left alone from ...


14

I am a huge fan of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. It is what I used to be able to do the splits cold. Ideally you need a partner for it, but most of it can be done by yourself although you will have slower or limited results doing it solo. The premise of the stretch is to relax the target muscles, then force them to tighten and ...


14

From the origin of belts and gis themselves: Kano apparently began the custom of having his yudansha wear black obi (belts) in 1886. These obi weren't the belts karateka and judoka wear today -- Kano hadn't invented the judogi (Judo uniform) yet, and his students were still practicing in kimono. They were the wide obi still worn with formal kimono. In ...


14

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


13

There are several things I can think of that might help, depending on exactly what the underlying problems are. Slow Repetition The most fundamental thing I've ever seen improve speed is slow repetition. We say that "speed comes from repetition" in my Hapkido class and when I trained with a rapier we had similar expressions: you had to go slowly before you ...


13

So for those that don't know, "Dai Sempai" is a kind of rank or recognition that is given to the head student in the class. This is typically the student with the highest rank who has spent the most amount of time at that school than any other student who might have the same rank. They often lead classes through basic exercises and drills and act as an ...


13

Your intuition is correct. It is a very vulnerable position. That should give you a clue about its bunkai. For those that don't know, Bunkai is the Okinawan karate term used to refer to the practice of analyzing a kata for its self-defense applications. Right off the bat, you know this is not a block. And you can conclude that because it would be insane to ...


12

I'll second some of the responses here and say that unless you're gifted, you probably won't be able to avoid confusing Kyokushin with Taekwondo. The stances, the techniques, the level of force, what counts as "legal" or "illegal" contact, etc. will all be different enough that it will drive your instructors crazy trying to correct you all the time. You're ...


12

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't punch ...


12

Thank you for the question. It's actually quite a good one to ask, because a lot of people assume all karate is basically the same. And that's not true. There are 3 main branches of karate in my perspective (there are actually more, and I'll mention that later): Shuri-Te Naha-Te Japanese karate (Shotokan derivatives) The Shuri-Te and Naha-Te lineages come ...


11

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


11

Wrestling and kyokushin karate go together fine. Most martial arts that cover different disciplines (e.g. striking/wrestling, or punching/kicking) work fine together because they complement each other. Arts that cover the same discipline, like Tae Kwon Do and Muay Thai, or wrestling and judo, can be confusing to combine if both arts are new to the trainee. ...


11

There is a famous zen story, one of the variation is this… Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era (1868-1912), received a university professor who came to inquire about Zen. Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor’s cup full, and then kept on pouring. The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain himself. “It is ...


10

This is an interesting question, there isn't really any one right answer. Asking them questions regarding their character is not really appropriate. They should have been training at a particular dojo for some time, and a lot should already be known about their character before they are invited to grade. Therefore asking character oriented questions at the ...


10

Do you have a bad Wing Chun teacher? I don't know, as it really does not sound at all like Wing Chun. Going back to its roots, Wing Chun is actually named for one of the early female practitioners of the art. It emphasizes techniques where the user flows around the enemy, as it is expected that the WC user would lose when facing an opponent head-on (...


10

I'm a Taekwondo instructor. I would happily make an exception for a special case like this, put your phone on the loudest volume, somewhere at the side of the class where it's easily hearable. Even tell everyone that it's a special case for this phone to be on, if they hear it please make Danielle aware of it. I would genuinely say just speak to your ...


10

First, it's unclear how useful Okinawan karate was for self-defense prior to its transformation under Funakoshi, Itosu, et al., especially in comparison to modern methods. Second, the major factors introducing impracticality are, to my mind, 1) incomplete transmission, 2) kata and classes as group activity, and 3) isolation from hojo undo and tegumi. ...


10

There are several reasons, but in my opinion, they are somewhat of a cop-out - and yet a relief. Keep in mind, getting into the Olympics is a herculean task: there needs to be a federation representing 75 countries on 4 continents (for men) and 40 countries on 3 continents (for women), anti-doping policies, "modern appeal", media interest, promote gender ...


10

The answer is simple: Because the vast majority of karate is taught by instructors who don't know what realistic bunkai is. And that's because their instructors were never taught it. And their instructors' instructors were never taught it, etc. This goes back many generations. But why? I gave a good overview of the subject at this link. And you should ...


10

You didn't give a specific problem you're having, so, it's hard to say what might be the problem. There are two primary elements to the kick: the chamber and the thrust. There is your starting position, but, there can be many. Do you kick with the front leg or the back? Is it a stepping behind or a stepping ahead? Is it a standing front leg kick? Are ...


10

Firstly, whatever you learned fifteen years ago might be muddled by age and memory lose. I would not rely on it. Secondly, since it was a child's rank and not adult, the syllabus might have been radically different. Finally, after any long break period, it is advisable to start again as a beginner. If it all comes back, you can wear your old coloured belt. ...


9

Aikido, judo and karate are all complementary arts: One (karate) focus on strikes, the others on avoidance, control of the opponent, and using body physiognomy to control/throw. Judo works from grapples and Aikido from a distance. As such, they are all good additions to each other. Whatever art you chose to do, remember to "empty your cup" before ...


9

Visit a couple of dojos that interest you and ask about their injury record. Look for older students; once you cross 50, injuries count more and heal slower. Moreover you're more likely to have other injuries that complicate your practice. Ask about training with injuries, and "opt-out". I can no longer do kneeling work, and when I visit a new dojo I ...


9

Just because a karate style may include weapon katas does not mean that the name "karate" is invalidated. You can think of Kobudo as an extension, or sister art(s) to Karate. Okinawan weapon arts are supposed to have been based on farming tools that the practitioners would have had readily available. Additionally, as has been noted elsewhere, Kara in the ...


9

Figuring out if he either wants to be there or is forced to go by his parents is important. If the latter, then there is not much you can do about it. He might get better if he has something that engages him but that can be hard to gauge if he is not mature enough to tell you about it. You can still try though. As a side note, as Mark suggested in a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible