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2

Further to Macaco's answer... This is yet another example of where both techniques have merit. Near-full extension and partial extension both replicate different combat circumstances. To practice only one of these exclusively is to prepare well for one set of circumstances whilst neglecting the other. Despite the fact that many top fighters seem to ...


4

I was taught to not strike at full extension because of the risk of hyperextending the limbs due to a lack of resistance. To avoid this sort of injury, never fully extend (or hyperextend) your elbow joints during shadow boxing (especially if you are punching hard and fast). Your jab gets its speed and power from the rotation of your shoulder joint, not from ...


3

What follows is relevant most often to kicks in which your opponent is directly in front of you, or perhaps slightly to the right (if in orthodox stance), and when your opponent is within close or medium range. Some of the best rear leg roundhouse kicks I've seen have been executed without pivoting (or very minimal pivoting) of the front foot. The technique ...


5

First of all, both approaches are valid and quite useful. A modern martial artist should be able to do both. Why the divergent approach? It's hard to say because it's so thoroughly a historical-cultural difference rather than a true philosophical choice, which means it often comes down to luck or personal preferences of unknown people in the unrecorded past. ...


8

It comes down to the same reasons which hold for the different roundhouse kick: power and dmg vs. speed and predictability. Thai fighters have a different goal compared to karate and TKD fighters as they have different rulesets: Muay Thai fighters don't want to touch, they want to penetrate. That is the reason why Muay Thai doesn't mind if there is slightly ...


1

Low kicks. Having one leg forward in a wide stance is an invitation to getting low-kicked, and after taking a couple of kicks to the thigh or calf you generally stop bouncing. That's why Thai fighters are taught to stand in a narrower stance, with the weight more on the back foot, such that they can lift the knee to block incoming low and middle kicks. In ...


4

This clip is of a points karate match, not a full contact contest. Points karate prioritises speed over impact. Pronounced bouncing is typically viewed as undesirable in full contact fights, because the rhythm created by the bouncing makes your strikes more predictable, and also allows your opponent to time strikes to land either when you're unweighted (and ...


0

A small addition to exactly-right Rob's answer. Such move is not always welcome - some people advising to avoid it for better defense. And for, say, middle-kicks they are right - it can be "eaten" to close the distance - and if your closer hand is down, you are in trouble. But in this particular situation your head is just out of your opponent's ...


4

From what I can tell from the discussions between Muay Thai-ists(?) that I've seen/known, this is done for the same reasons as dropping the hand back is done in the roundhouse (again something which a majority of karate, kickboxing, etc schools seem to avoid). These reasons are an increase in torque/power, improved balance, and in some cases an element of &...


2

The WKF style sparring both of these videos display is points/touch sparring, where excessive contact is penalised (see the controversy over a recent Olympic Gold medal being awarded to a fighter who got knocked out). Having competed in this style the risk of serious injury is very low compared even with light continuous kick boxing sparring (which similarly ...


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