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12

It's similar to the concept of shaking hands with your right hand. The majority of people are right handed, so when shaking hands you present this hand and clasp to show you do not have weapons. With a sword, a right-handed person draws faster for combat with the sword on the left side of the body. In this example, the draw motion continues directly into ...


9

Major categories that I am aware of (expanding slightly on Sardathrion's comment): Iaijutsu (居合術) and Iaido (居合道) are the art of drawing the sword. Iaijutsu, theoretically, prefers more practical application while iaido is closer to an internal martial art, but you'll find schools under both names that exist along a bit of a continuum. Kenjutsu (剣術) is ...


7

The book of five rings, written by Miyamoto Musashi around 1645, advocates two-sword fencing style (nitōjutsu): that is, wielding both katana and wakizashi. He does, however, states that you should use two long swords while training!!


7

You've answered your own question. It's etiquette. Right-hand means you don't expect to use your sword. Left-hand means you're ready for action. The Samurai had loads of rules and etiquette to abide by. This code of conduct is called Bushido (the way of the warrior). It's a lot like the Western concept of Chivalry. In modern terms, it would be like carrying ...


6

There are a few forms in Tenshinsho-den Katori Shinto ryu. I know they exist, but was not able to progress to that level in my local school. Here is a link to a video of the style. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2xmfyZSn80


5

Sorry if this is a vague answer, and I don't know the first thing about the Seido karate style, but I remember an instructor (I can't remember what style. Kajukenbo, perhaps?) at a martial arts camp once telling me that they only taught weapons at black belt level to avoid weapons bias. The idea was that a practitioner should be fully proficient in empty ...


5

Yes. Contrary to what the average "expert" on swords and Japanese swordsmanship will tell you online (along with their obligatory mentions to Miyamoto Musashi who everyone obligatorily must mention whenever dual-wielding Japanese swords is discussed even though in his own book he clearly states using two swords is nothing new in Japan and there ...


3

Don't discount Kendo yet! The shinai was created to reduce the risk of injuries during the practice of swordsmanship. Combined with the bogu, it allows for semi-realistic combat practice. While I'll readily admit that the kendo rules are far removed from those of an actual battlefield, the same could be said about boxing, or most martial arts, in fact. ...


3

This would be within the realms of possibility. I would not rule out the existence of some kata for this, because there are hundreds of Japanese sword schools. But, it is unlikely. To understand why, you need to know what a katana is. It is not a general term for a Japanese sword. It is not a weapon designed for the battlefield. A katana was one of the ...


3

This should just be a comment under Macaco Brancos answer, but my reputation is to low. So I write it as a full answer: In your own comment, you write that you think about learning Ju Jutsu. It will probably depend on the style and your teacher, but in 3 years of training I never even held a sword. When using weapons we never even consider anything beyond ...


3

There are several different martial arts styles the practice swordwork with the katana. If you're looking to do sports sparring, I'd advise Kendo. If you're looking for something closer to historical teaching, and with unarmed combat mixed in, you're looking for Kenjutsu. That is sometimes taught on its own, and is sometimes part of another style such as ...


3

See if you find a dojo practicing the Nishio school of Aikido. They place a lot of focus on katana and stick fighting... https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nishio+aikido As you can see, many of the classic Aikido techniques stem from swordfighting; and Nishio placed a lot of focus to show this relationship (much more so than other styles). There ...


2

As Sean said, nito ryu teach the way to fight with a katana and a wakizashi, but in real fight, on a ground battle, a samurai could use those technique with a second full sized katana. I practised it and i don't remember any technique which wouldn't work with two katana. There is some Kenjutsu Dojo that are able to teach it if you wanna try it


2

Since you are in a location (Paris) that has a plethora of dojo, I would strongly suggest you check out as many different styles as you can1. In summary, look at places and chose the one where you have the most fun. As Dungath states in his answer, do not discount Kendo. Some clubs will be very physical and might well teach iaido as well. But if it is ...


2

Many ninjutsu and related arts like To Shin Do have weapons classes open to all from the beginning, some even incorporate weapons training into regular classes as well. Look at your friendly neighborhood band of ninjas to see. :)


1

Dual wielding of equal weapons is relatively rare in warfare historically. Wielding a smaller secondary weapon is much more common (e.g. rapier + parrying dagger, katana + wakizashi, tomahawk + longknife). However, there are a few cases (though all of these are 'small' weapons, none the size of katanas): Dual sai (Okinawan martial arts) Dual butterfly ...


1

Iaido uses a katana, but only when you are advanced. Any martial art that involves two people "fighting" will not use a katana. The sword used in these is the wooden Bokuto.


1

Kendo the "way of the Sword" Iaido the "art of Drawing Swords" or " being Consonantly prepared" Both teach you the ways of using a Katana but don't necessary require the use of the actually blade to learn. They also focus on the mind set that some with practice the blade and learn how to cut with one.


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