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8

Ki (気) does mean "energy" or "mood", but the A (合) is just a shout of enthusiasm (Korean does use the energy+join setup with K'ihap), so no, there's nothing mystical about it any more than a sports team breaking their huddle by shouting something like, "go team!"


6

You are mixing world religions and confusing Chinese chi with Japanese ki. This is problematic. They are different interpretations of mystical force. Since you used the term "kiai" I will speak from the Japanese interpretation since kiai is a Japanese word. The usage and meaning of kiai varies depending on context and origin. The Japanese have many ...


5

The kiai, kihap, or "shout" serves many different purposes. It can help provide focus by association (you shout when you strike in practice, so shouting in combat helps you land that prototype strike). It can help provide power (I don't know the mechanism exactly, but shouting or grunting often helps people exert more effort, something to do with ...


4

This is similar to the effect when forcefully exhaling during weightlifting - the forceful exhalation (different to the Valsalva manoeuvre, which is also employed in some situations) creates not only a rigidity in the abdomen which allows for more efficient force transfer, but also increases muscle tension globally. This is useful for the martial arts ...


4

As per the provided link, there's a number of factors going on. First of all, a kiai is as much about a forceful exhalation and a focus of purpose as it is actually yelling. Many of the fighters do just that grunting or exhaling on a heavy strike. One of the other purposes of a kiai is to startle the opponent. In the Octagon, most fighters are prepared for ...


4

For the sake of answering, I'm going to assume you're asking "When is the best time to kiai in order to maximize effect?" Leaving aside any psychological benefit, the physiological effect of kiaiing is to tense the diaphragm and firm up the connection between the upper and lower body. Simply put, if there's "wiggle" in your core, a punch ...


4

From a purely mechanical perspective, the purpose of a kiai in a punch is to force the abdominal muscles to engage, allowing for the transfer of effort (kinetic energy) from the legs and hips to the chest and arms in event of a punch (providing a backstop in accordance with Newton's Third Law of Motion), allowing more of this power to be delivered to the ...


4

Besides the inner and outer manifestations of power and focus which are mentioned in the other answers, the yell also has other uses which haven't been mentioned. In two styles, the kiai (japanese) or kihap (korean) have context in sport rules: In Kendo, the attacker must yell the target: men (head), kote (wrist), do (side, waist, body), and tsuki (throat) ...


3

Kiai means merging your energy. (Ki = energy, Ai = merge/join/blend/combine.) The short story is that what you're attempting to do is, in the moment that you shout, you merge the ki throughout the body. In kiko (chi-kung) practice, this means circulating the energy from the dantien through the governing and conception vessels and out through to your limbs ...


3

The exhalation is not linked to any particular sports, but a rather profane mechanism: Tensioning of the abdominal muscles reduces the volume of your lower abdomen and thus pushes your diaphragm upwards, which in turn reduces the volume of your lungs so that the air has to go somewhere, voluntarily or not. Any kind of lifting, crunching, or torsion movement ...


2

I can state that it is not a universal principle in martial arts. In both Doce Pares Escrima and Capoeira, I was specifically told not to tie my breaths to strikes, but rather to focus on breathing evenly and naturally during the movement. This is basically because, in both styles, you're expected to be blending strikes into fluid sequences rather than a set ...


2

A kiai comes from the hara or dantian in the same way that a singer projects using their diaphragm. You can point to a physical place on your body and say this is where the hara is, or this is where the dantian is, and this place is roughly where you feel pressure when your diaphragm pushes down into your abdomen as you inhale deeply. In this limited sense, ...


2

From Hapkido by Marc Tedeschi while interviewing Grandmaster Han-Jae Ji, "Ki-power is adrenaline only? Yes. Adrenaline only. There is no energy out there in the universe that we bring into our bodies? No. Why does virtually every book written on Eastern thought state something quite different-energy is absorbed from nature, the body possesses three tanjon ...


1

If one has sufficient vocal training, and can project ones voice, this technique can indeed be used to disrupt the concentration of a many opponents. Here what I mean is being able to vocalize with sufficient direction and volume that the opponent can feel it in their inner ear. This is particularly effective in a closed space, which creates resonance at ...


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