15

Kickboxing is a generic term for fighting sports/systems that use kicking and boxing techniques, though the rules of some but not all kickboxing groups do allow additional techniques such as elbows and knees. Muay Thai is a sports form distilled from the traditional Thai martial arts (Muay boran). Muay thai uses kicking, punching, elbows and knees, ...


14

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


14

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


14

I will present a judo view of sparring, which will be partially applicable to a kickboxing situation. Judo has two key principles: mutual welfare and benefit maximum efficiency As applied to sparring, the first principle means that you both need to get something out of your time practicing together. If there is a large strength or size disparity (adult v. ...


12

As a short answer, I'd say that it comes down to trust and pattern recognition. Respect the level of experience. During sparring, if the woman recognizes the patterns in your attack and defends with the right moves, then you can increase your intensity. If she's lobbing punches and kicking when there's no chance of connecting, ease up. If you don't want a ...


10

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


10

The main difference between Muay Thai and kickboxing is that Muay Thai allows additional techniques, e.g. elbow strikes, knee strikes and clinches. A kickboxing referee will usually break up a clinch, but in Muay Thai, he will not. Kickboxing has a minimum and maximum number of kicks you must land during a round (I think it's 8 and 15 respectively but I'm ...


9

Well the short answer is: Why not try it for a month and see whether or not it's something you're capable of doing? Because you won't know until you try. One of the main concerns of practicing more than one style at a time is that you might confuse them, and it will annoy your teachers as well as perhaps slowing your progress. This is a bigger concern for ...


7

Despite ice's enduring popularity and former recommendations for its use in RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation) treatment, ice is no longer recommended for reducing inflammation or bruising. Gabe Mirkin, MD, who first coined the RICE mnemonic, explains on his blog dated Sept 2015 that ice delays recovery from injury. PhysicalTherapyWeb tells a similar ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

You're being dumb. Go get training and stop yard fighting. -- JohnP. STOP … JUST STOP! There is nothing good down the road you are travelling. You are going to hurt yourself physically and mentally. You are going to hurt others and not just the one your beat up. You are opening yourself to horrendous legal consequences. Fight Club is a great movie but it ...


6

You need ask yourself a question: What do I want to achieve in martial arts? If you want a sport first place - injury guaranteed If you want the cultural experience - no injury If you want self-defense - depends on the system, injury might occur Usually martial arts are without contact or more usually instructors are keeping everyone safe so nothing ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


6

No they are not. The mouth guards are designed to protect against different kinds of impact most common to sports. You have the top only mouth guard which is meant to be something between your teeth for chomping impact. You have a separate top and bottom mouth guard which has a full set covering each teeth to help prevent outside impact into the teeth ...


6

There is a judo version of this question about the difference between a sensei (mentor) and coach (cornerman). The United States Judo Federation has a long answer to this question that considers the cultural history and etymology of these words, what functions they perform, and how the roles may overlap, but basically comes to the conclusion that the ...


6

I'm not sure why you feel the need to adapt your sparring to women specifically. I always try to adapt my sparring to the person I'm sparring with: make it interesting and challenging for them if I can, and let them do the same for me. Always agree on the level of power (which can be implicit with people you know, but with smaller/less powerful people than ...


6

If you are sparring hard and you get hit, you don't have the time to pause and call your family doctor. I want to know how experts (i.e., those who have serious sparring experience) deal with this. I'm an advocate for training hard, sometimes really hard. But in doing so you shouldn't lose perspective - there is no point continuing the hard training if it ...


5

What is a concussion? In the last few years we've gotten a lot more info on them, and literally, they are brain damage. What makes them especially dangerous is that concussions can be extremely unpredictable in terms of cause to effect - sure, getting hit harder in the head is worse, but sometimes lighter hits can cause severe concussions or heavier hits ...


5

I've trained in 5 or 6 martial arts over the course of 30+ years, mostly physically vigorous ones with a moderate to high level of contact. I've taught and trained with hundreds of people, and probably seen thousands compete in tournaments. I've never heard of anybody with "swollen/damaged organs" from MA training and don't even know if that's physically ...


5

Cold/hot flush Here's a trick I learned from a coach & sports medicine expert - after a workout, soak cold for 10 minutes then soak hot/warm after. I started doing that and found my own soreness reduced by 2/3rds (of course, pain is subjective so...) He typically dumped his players into a tub with ice, I'm not as hardcore so I just use a cold bath ...


5

This is a problem for me as well. This is usually due to friction tearing your skin open as you try to pivot. Look for some shoes you can wear during training. Skeletoes work really well for me, but I usually split my toes due to hardwood, not mats. They do make mat-specific shoes. Use "New Skin" or some other brand of liquid bandage to seal up your ...


5

I second taping your toes. I use Johnson's & Johnson's athletic tape to tape my toes and I rarely have any issues with the tape slipping or falling off, in fact, I have to cut it off with a knife from time to time because it sticks so well. I pull enough tape to wrap around my toe about two or three times and fold one corner down so that I can remove ...


5

Yes, there's a danger of concussion. My answer to another question on concusssions. Do you know what sports end up getting a surprising amount of concussions? Soccer and volleyball. It's not because these folks are getting hit in the head all the time - it's just that when they do get hit, they have had little conditioning to help deal with the blow. Any ...


5

It's almost impossible to shoehorn fighters into individual styles these days since they're all training multiple martial arts. Rarely do we see the old school "karate guy" or "judo guy". Even those experts (Stephen Thompson, Dan Kelly) are also experts in several other martial arts. Tony Ferguson (UFC lightweight title contender) even says he trains every ...


5

I think you are mixing up training purposes here. Speed drills are mostly for three purposes: Rhythm/reaction training, muscle memory, and cardio. The latter is especially true for working the bags. Other aspects are things like footwork/angles, establishing kinetic chains crossing the corpus callosum, etc. If you are doing this fast, you can do many more ...


5

do we need to step with the lead leg while throwing a jab to add some power? No. A step is useful to get an opponent in range, but if they're already comfortably in range there's no need to step, and power comes from the legs twisting your hips and torso/shoulders into the punch - if you use some of that energy to move your whole body forward, and the body ...


5

I prefer to be left hand forward, if I am hit in the right eye (and it swells/vision blurred etc.) I feel able to carry on. If I lose some vision in my left eye, I struggle much more, I have to turn my head to favour the right eye or even switch stance. Now given that the way I spar encourages kicks from the front leg and the jab, this all ties in heavily ...


5

If you are getting caught by front leg side kicks then this means you are putting yourself in the way of them. A couple of rules of thumb against leggy people. Don't change stance in range unless they are retreating/on the back foot - you are simply giving them a massive target. Using the back leg (or a large rotation with the back hand) causes your body ...


5

Apologies for the late answer. While I am shadow boxing, I always wonder if it's necessary to ... Yes. It is absolutely necessary that you do everything in your shadowboxing that you would do in your sparring sessions or fights. If you like throwing the spinning side kick when you are sparring, you must throw hundreds of them when you are shadowboxing. The ...


4

I've been training Karate for the last 11 years. You get hurt sometimes, accidents or clashes happen. You get over it. I've had a few injuries over the years, broken foot, hand, ribs, all from accidents. It happens. You try to learn from it (block with your hand closed!) and carry on. Our Dojo is very strict on having control, which should be a factor in ...


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