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There is a judo version of this question about the difference between a sensei (mentor) and coach (cornerman). The United States Judo Federation has a long answer to this question that considers the cultural history and etymology of these words, what functions they perform, and how the roles may overlap, but basically comes to the conclusion that the ...


5

I prefer to be left hand forward, if I am hit in the right eye (and it swells/vision blurred etc.) I feel able to carry on. If I lose some vision in my left eye, I struggle much more, I have to turn my head to favour the right eye or even switch stance. Now given that the way I spar encourages kicks from the front leg and the jab, this all ties in heavily ...


5

If you are getting caught by front leg side kicks then this means you are putting yourself in the way of them. A couple of rules of thumb against leggy people. Don't change stance in range unless they are retreating/on the back foot - you are simply giving them a massive target. Using the back leg (or a large rotation with the back hand) causes your body ...


4

Now this is a very interesting question that I personally have experience with. As I have a large cutting scar on my left eye, I can't open my left eye. The eye works, but I can't open the eyelid. I use a left forward stance, even though I am left handed. However, I don't do boxing. But it doesn't matter. The eyesight isn't that much different when 1 eye is ...


4

Forgive me for stating the obvious, but Scott Adkins is an actor. The closest I've found to him being in a prizefight is here, which is pretty obviously a staged/choreographed fight. The videos in class are him kicking someone who is standing in one place to let him kick them. Front-leg side kicks are used in kick-boxing, and a bit less often in MMA, but the ...


3

A few things that you get from pad work vs bag work (I'm proceeding from an assumption of smaller handheld pads vs a larger "kick" pad): Smaller targets - Arguably, you can designate parts of the heavy bag, and target your strikes there, but you get less immediate feedback on whether you've hit it or not (hitting just a bit off-target with a pad feels ...


2

I can't provide any personal input on this, but this Reddit topic discusses a good stance for Dutch-style kickboxing: Lead foot forward, rear foot 90 degrees out to your side. Dutch style usually involves "lighter" and more boxing/karate styled footwork rather than the Muay Thai "march". Lead foot is more planted than in Muay Thai, guard styles vary ...


1

Mentors talk about the question. Cornermen answer the question and solve the problem. Thank you for making that so clear. I prefer a cornerman.


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