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5

While my background is Karate, rather than BJJ, hopefully this answers at least part of your question. The first thing to remember is that this is a specialised technique. As I tell my students: 90% of the time, you'll be using the first 10% of the syllabus. That is, after all, why we teach those techniques first - they are relatively simple to learn and ...


5

"what's the point in high kicks if you can't use them in real life" Just because you can't - currently - doesn't mean others can't, or that you couldn't. It can vary a lot by kick - for example, some people (me for example) find mae geri (front kick) much easier to deliver high and "cold" than mawashi geri, or even uchi and/or soto geri, or ushiro mawashi ...


4

Forgive me for stating the obvious, but Scott Adkins is an actor. The closest I've found to him being in a prizefight is here, which is pretty obviously a staged/choreographed fight. The videos in class are him kicking someone who is standing in one place to let him kick them. Front-leg side kicks are used in kick-boxing, and a bit less often in MMA, but the ...


4

As long as everyone is silent, I'll add my two cents. When using your knees to hit your opponent's body, you may go in two ways: Your opponent is much stronger than you. You cannot pull his body towards you to make it more vulnerable to your knees. In such situations, frequent and light hits may be an option - at least it will complicate your opponent'...


3

The flying armbar to counter a single leg attack should not be expected to work outside of demonstration. Notice for example, how the receiver helpfully presents their arm to be locked while holding the leg up. If they don't, you need to find another option.


3

"However, does this mean that they shouldn't be used for self defense or MMA until you've mastered them?" There are many techniques that involve putting yourself in a "weak" position to execute it. You have interest in BJJ; if you try to do a triangle choke to defend yourself but you're not 100% comfortable with it, you'll probably get some punches to the ...


3

Hopefully, I'm not misunderstanding what technique you're trying to throw. Based on your other question, you want to be able to throw a sidekick off of your front leg, possibly first involving a slide or a hop off your back leg. Based on your description of having to turn 120 degrees, I suspect that you're chambering the kick sideways. Take a look at this ...


3

Assuming you don't need convincing that high kicks are useful (and watching an MMA bout does show that they can be fight-enders, although they also can be very risky outside of the ring and its rules), if you can kick after stretching, the odds are you can kick in a crisis, although you may regret it the next morning. Adrenaline is a hell of a drug, and half ...


3

I don't have this problem. Sometimes my legs get sore, but that goes away after a couple of days. If you stretch every day, and even do maybe ten high kicks with each leg in the morning, and if you can, after lunch, that should be enough to use them whenever you want. Remember, self defense isn't the only purpose for martial arts. There are several ...


2

From what I read in your post, you might be talking about the Axe Kick. It's a kick where you swing your leg up as far as possible and then kick the opponents head or chest from above with your heel. It is technically possible to turn a roundhouse kick into an axe kick to surprise your opponent, although a lot of the initial energy of the kick will be lost. ...


2

I'd work on two areas. The explosiveness of the knee during the kick How hard you can knee someone depends on how strong your oblique muscles are, and how well they work with your hip rotation. Do a lot of crunches either with bodyweight or with resistance bands. Instead of usual knee kicks on the sandbag, practice jumping knee kicks, focusing ...


2

I feel really afraid to kick using the shin because I think the shin will break if someone blocked it using, for example, a knee. You are far more likely to break one or more of the many, many little bones in your foot than a big shin bone. As a real world example, kick something hard like some furniture, lightly of course, with your foot and then your ...


1

ask if there is a tutorial of how to do it Not that I know of. Are there any other ways to counter the leg catch defense? I wouldn't even call the way in the video a valid way. As mattm and JohnP say, that armbar is impractical without a cooperative partner in a scripted demonstration. And not just in the "oh, it'd be so hard to pull off" - it's ...


1

Simply put: because the mat isn't that pretty. In my experience in Aikido, lifting the leg high will only set yourself up for a leg sweep or joint lock. When you are allowed to grab your opponent's kicking leg and sweep the knee, most people won't risk it. It's a good way to end your time in the ring for good.


1

In reality, a lot of "kicks" were pushes when used within the context of original applications from which the "kick" was taken, they were not kicks at all. In this context the use of the ball of the foot for most kicks makes perfect sense, and it continues to make sense when used with additional force as impact delivering kicks. In traditional karate (...


1

I know in some schools they teach that the transitional stance before/after a kick is neko-dachi (the cat stance). I remember being quized on this very question in class once and that was the answer.


1

As already mentioned above: shin conditioning. Let me add some words, too. You should start on a soft bag, then continue with hard bag, and then - with roped logs (you may see it in your gim - roped log, wrapped with rope). Roped logs are also differ - usually, the thinner is wrapping rope, the harder is to kick it. The key points in conditioning - ...


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