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2

I have mainly learned Shorinji Kempo. This style has a great many kicks and punches to people who are pinned to the ground. The general rule is that you hit wherever you can reach from the pin, but pick weak points. Just like any other kick you don't want to hit with the toe (unless you are wearing steel toe caps or similar). Kick with the ball of the foot ...


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A judo perspective: if you throw an opponent, you want to finish in a standing position with control of an arm. This gives you options: you can disengage, you can continue into more grappling, or you can kick/stomp the opponent from this position. There is not much the person on the ground can do at this point; you have giant lever to control their movement ...


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I've studied a variety of arts, but mainly an old style of taekwondo / tangsoodo (~20 years), hapkido (3), and kyokushin karate (6). The only techniques I've seen in TKD that are specifically intended for hitting opponents on the ground are a few stomping kicks - and they tend to be mixed in with step-sparring exercises and appear in a couple patterns, but ...


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There are four types of Side kick in ITF Tkd:- 1 ) Side PIERCING kick: executed whilst rotating the FOOTSWORD, the heel portion of the blade of the foot, on the enemy's body upon impact. The rotation is what makes it a 'piercing' kick. Side THRUSTING kick: executed using the ball of the foot and NO rotation. Side PUSHING kick: Executed using the footsword, ...


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As a general rule, the higher you go up on your toes (well, really, the ball of the foot unless you're doing ballet), the more you reduce stability and power, but conversely you gain a bit in height/distance and increased flexibility/mobility. If that inch makes the difference between hitting your opponent or not (particularly if they've opted to try to just ...


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